Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1623401520

Testing Jakarta EE 9 Applications with Arquillian and Glassfish v6

Arquillian added a new module Arquillian Container Glassfish6 to align with the changes of Jakarta EE 9 and the features introduced in the Arquillian Core 1.7.0.

Arquillian Container Glassfish6 is designated to run tests on Glassfish v6, which is a full-featured Jakarta EE 9 compatible application server, so you can test all Jakarta EE 9 components using this new Arquillian Glassfish container.

In this post, we will try to run the our tests on the Glassfish container using both managed and remote adapters.

  • When using the managed adapter, Arquillian has ability to manage lifecycle of Glassfish server,eg. start and stop the container during the testing execution.
  • When using the remote adapter, Arquillian will try to run tests against a remote container, and gather the testing report through a proxy and send back to clients(IDE, Maven command console, etc.).

Note: The original Aruqillian Glassfish embedded container is not ported to the latest Glassfish v6 now.

Prerequisites

Note: Make sure you are using Java 8, Glassfish v6.0 does not support Java 11. Glassfish v6.1 will focus on Java 11 support.

#glassfish #arquillian #java #jakarta #java-ee #testing jakarta ee 9 applications with arquillian and glassfish v6

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Testing Jakarta EE 9 Applications with Arquillian and Glassfish v6
Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1623401520

Testing Jakarta EE 9 Applications with Arquillian and Glassfish v6

Arquillian added a new module Arquillian Container Glassfish6 to align with the changes of Jakarta EE 9 and the features introduced in the Arquillian Core 1.7.0.

Arquillian Container Glassfish6 is designated to run tests on Glassfish v6, which is a full-featured Jakarta EE 9 compatible application server, so you can test all Jakarta EE 9 components using this new Arquillian Glassfish container.

In this post, we will try to run the our tests on the Glassfish container using both managed and remote adapters.

  • When using the managed adapter, Arquillian has ability to manage lifecycle of Glassfish server,eg. start and stop the container during the testing execution.
  • When using the remote adapter, Arquillian will try to run tests against a remote container, and gather the testing report through a proxy and send back to clients(IDE, Maven command console, etc.).

Note: The original Aruqillian Glassfish embedded container is not ported to the latest Glassfish v6 now.

Prerequisites

Note: Make sure you are using Java 8, Glassfish v6.0 does not support Java 11. Glassfish v6.1 will focus on Java 11 support.

#glassfish #arquillian #java #jakarta #java-ee #testing jakarta ee 9 applications with arquillian and glassfish v6

Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1623309913

Deploying Jakarta EE 9 applications to WildFly

WildFly 22.0.0.Alph1 provides a standalone preview distribution for Jakarta EE 9.

Prerequisites

Make sure you have installed the following software.

  • Java 8 or Java 11
  • Apache Maven 3.6
  • WildFly 22.0.0.Alpha1 Jakarta EE 9 preview

Go to the WildFly Download page, and make sure you are downloading the Jakarta EE 9 preview version.

Get the source codes from my github.

#jboss #java-ee #java #jakarta-ee #wildfly #deploying jakarta ee 9 applications to wildfly

Tamia  Walter

Tamia Walter

1596754901

Testing Microservices Applications

The shift towards microservices and modular applications makes testing more important and more challenging at the same time. You have to make sure that the microservices running in containers perform well and as intended, but you can no longer rely on conventional testing strategies to get the job done.

This is where new testing approaches are needed. Testing your microservices applications require the right approach, a suitable set of tools, and immense attention to details. This article will guide you through the process of testing your microservices and talk about the challenges you will have to overcome along the way. Let’s get started, shall we?

A Brave New World

Traditionally, testing a monolith application meant configuring a test environment and setting up all of the application components in a way that matched the production environment. It took time to set up the testing environment, and there were a lot of complexities around the process.

Testing also requires the application to run in full. It is not possible to test monolith apps on a per-component basis, mainly because there is usually a base code that ties everything together, and the app is designed to run as a complete app to work properly.

Microservices running in containers offer one particular advantage: universal compatibility. You don’t have to match the testing environment with the deployment architecture exactly, and you can get away with testing individual components rather than the full app in some situations.

Of course, you will have to embrace the new cloud-native approach across the pipeline. Rather than creating critical dependencies between microservices, you need to treat each one as a semi-independent module.

The only monolith or centralized portion of the application is the database, but this too is an easy challenge to overcome. As long as you have a persistent database running on your test environment, you can perform tests at any time.

Keep in mind that there are additional things to focus on when testing microservices.

  • Microservices rely on network communications to talk to each other, so network reliability and requirements must be part of the testing.
  • Automation and infrastructure elements are now added as codes, and you have to make sure that they also run properly when microservices are pushed through the pipeline
  • While containerization is universal, you still have to pay attention to specific dependencies and create a testing strategy that allows for those dependencies to be included

Test containers are the method of choice for many developers. Unlike monolith apps, which lets you use stubs and mocks for testing, microservices need to be tested in test containers. Many CI/CD pipelines actually integrate production microservices as part of the testing process.

Contract Testing as an Approach

As mentioned before, there are many ways to test microservices effectively, but the one approach that developers now use reliably is contract testing. Loosely coupled microservices can be tested in an effective and efficient way using contract testing, mainly because this testing approach focuses on contracts; in other words, it focuses on how components or microservices communicate with each other.

Syntax and semantics construct how components communicate with each other. By defining syntax and semantics in a standardized way and testing microservices based on their ability to generate the right message formats and meet behavioral expectations, you can rest assured knowing that the microservices will behave as intended when deployed.

Ways to Test Microservices

It is easy to fall into the trap of making testing microservices complicated, but there are ways to avoid this problem. Testing microservices doesn’t have to be complicated at all when you have the right strategy in place.

There are several ways to test microservices too, including:

  • Unit testing: Which allows developers to test microservices in a granular way. It doesn’t limit testing to individual microservices, but rather allows developers to take a more granular approach such as testing individual features or runtimes.
  • Integration testing: Which handles the testing of microservices in an interactive way. Microservices still need to work with each other when they are deployed, and integration testing is a key process in making sure that they do.
  • End-to-end testing: Which⁠—as the name suggests⁠—tests microservices as a complete app. This type of testing enables the testing of features, UI, communications, and other components that construct the app.

What’s important to note is the fact that these testing approaches allow for asynchronous testing. After all, asynchronous development is what makes developing microservices very appealing in the first place. By allowing for asynchronous testing, you can also make sure that components or microservices can be updated independently to one another.

#blog #microservices #testing #caylent #contract testing #end-to-end testing #hoverfly #integration testing #microservices #microservices architecture #pact #testing #unit testing #vagrant #vcr

Samanta  Moore

Samanta Moore

1623896700

Guide to Contributing to Jakarta EE 10

This high-level guide outlines some possibilities for Jakarta EE 10 as well as how you can contribute.

Java EE has been transferred to the Eclipse Foundation and Jakarta EE 9.1 is behind us. The next step in the journey is Jakarta EE 10. This write-up outlines some possibilities for Jakarta EE 10 as well as how you can contribute.

Ways of Contributing

There are many ways of contributing to Jakarta EE 10, depending on what your time and interest allow. You can always start simple and get more engaged over time.

  • You can simply follow a Jakarta EE technology that interests you. The easiest way to do that is by subscribing to its mailing list. All the Jakarta mailing lists are available here. We specifically link the mailing lists for some likely key Jakarta EE 10 technologies below. You should feel free to join discussions that interest you. Contributing your opinion as an end-user is one of the most valuable things you can do.
  • If you have a specific feature you would like to advocate for, you should do so on the mailing list to start with. It may be necessary to record an issue detailing the feature if it does not already exist. Each project has a GitHub repository where you can record issues. You should be able to find the issue tracker for projects from here. We specifically link the issue trackers for some likely key Jakarta EE 10 technologies below.
  • If you want to help implement a change in the technology, you should look through the issue trackers and ask to pick up an issue on the mailing list. You can contribute an API change, a TCK change, or a change in one of the technology implementations (such as GlassFishJerseyMojarraOpenMQ, or EclipseLink). Providing a proof-of-concept if you can is a great way to advocate for change (although this is clearly not an expectation from everyone).
  • If you are unsure where to start, just get on a mailing list, introduce yourself and say you want to help. There should be a Jakarta EE Ambassador present to engage you. You can also reach out through the Jakarta EE Ambassadors Google Group.

#java #java ee #jakarta ee #jakarta ee 10 #guide to contributing to jakarta ee 10

Dejah  Reinger

Dejah Reinger

1599859380

How to Do API Testing?

Nowadays API testing is an integral part of testing. There are a lot of tools like postman, insomnia, etc. There are many articles that ask what is API, What is API testing, but the problem is How to do API testing? What I need to validate.

Note: In this article, I am going to use postman assertions for all the examples since it is the most popular tool. But this article is not intended only for the postman tool.

Let’s directly jump to the topic.

Let’s consider you have an API endpoint example http://dzone.com/getuserDetails/{{username}} when you send the get request to that URL it returns the JSON response.

My API endpoint is http://dzone.com/getuserDetails/{{username}}

The response is in JSON format like below

JSON

{
  "jobTitle": "string",
  "userid": "string",
  "phoneNumber": "string",
  "password": "string",
  "email": "user@example.com",
  "firstName": "string",
  "lastName": "string",
  "userName": "string",
  "country": "string",
  "region": "string",
  "city": "string",
  "department": "string",
  "userType": 0
}

In the JSON we can see there are properties and associated values.

Now, For example, if we need details of the user with the username ‘ganeshhegde’ we need to send a **GET **request to **http://dzone.com/getuserDetails/ganeshhegde **

dzone.com

Now there are two scenarios.

1. Valid Usecase: User is available in the database and it returns user details with status code 200

2. Invalid Usecase: User is Unavailable/Invalid user in this case it returns status with code 404 with not found message.

#tutorial #performance #api #test automation #api testing #testing and qa #application programming interface #testing as a service #testing tutorial #api test