Brain  Crist

Brain Crist

1597028400

Notes from Visual Studio Live! No Typical Developer

As the newly incumbent editor in chief of this online magazine, I eagerly anticipated attending the recent Visual Studio Live! conference in Orlando.

I looked forward to the opportunity to mingle with developers, talk about their concerns, their motivations, their challenges, their likes and dislikes of working within the Microsoft developer environment.

Basically, I wanted to talk to the folks on the front lines to help me align our coverage with what they want and need.

And that’s exactly what I did, engaging with attendees at every opportunity: over coffee and danish during breaks between sessions, over meals, during social/networking events and so on.

The main – and also enlightening and somewhat surprising – takeaway was this: There’s no typical developer who comes to these conferences, this one being part of a larger Live! 360 event.

Following are some notes on this and other insights I gleaned from the nearly one-week conference.

No Typical Developer

For some reason, I envisioned a typical developer profile of a roughly 30-something male working at a midsize/large enterprise with a sizeable developer contingent and supporting staff.

I found those, but I also talked to women, senior devs – much experienced folks with decades of experience – and even some who served as almost one-person dev shops, responsible for just about everything in the workflow, even including handling “help desk” calls.

Budget Constraints

In the mainstream media, I’m continually told the economy is booming, that America is being made great again and companies are thriving in the new order, spending their newfound largesse and increasing investments.

What I found is quite different. Attendee after attendee mentioned tight budget constraints and scarce resources and support. Everybody seems to be struggling to make do with what they have, and they attended Visual Studio Live! to learn about tools and techniques that can help them get their jobs done easier and cheaper.

Not that Cutting Edge

I continually write about the new, the previews, the betas, the next greatest, cutting-edge wonder tool coming down the pike. Many of our commissioned hands-on tutorials deal with the same.

What I found, however, is many developers more concerned with the here-and-now caretaking of existing and legacy technologies. One developer had to maintain four different versions of Visual Studio because of the hodgepodge of disparate systems and components that they separately had to tie into. (I admit that sounds odd to me. It seems there should be some way to use just one version for all the functionality needed, but I didn’t get an opportunity to delve into the details for why this approach was needed, unfortunately.)

At a panel discussion presentation, few in the audience were familiar with Progressive Web Apps, an initiative I’ve written about multiple times – something I thought was the wave of the future in the mobile space, familiar to just about everyone. That wasn’t the case for this and several other newer or cutting-edge technologies. Some coders were interested in this new-fangled Xamarin thing, for example (I thought it was a popular, well-known adjunct to the Visual Studio experience).

This tells me to review our coverage strategies to determine the correct mix of content. To go beyond examining the latest previews and betas and include more about the here-and-now challenges faced by devs on a daily basis.

To be fair, several of our commissioned hands-on tutorial experts do touch on the established tools and techniques along with the latest iPhone X dev tips and such. But perhaps we need to do more entrenched, legacy stuff. You tell me in the comments section of this article or via e-mail (address at the end).

Foresighted Companies

Related to the aforementioned budget constraints, I found it interesting that even small companies were sending their developers to Visual Studio Live! Even though times are seemingly still tough for many, firms of all sizes are sending developers to learn how to do their jobs better.

More than one attendee said their bosses (actually some of them were bosses) see it as an investment for the future. The initial cost, they believe, will be more than offset by productivity gains and new initiatives or techniques that will directly affect the bottom line.

I worked for a successful media conglomerate during the lean mid-2000s that followed the same philosophy, sending me and other staffers to educational and professional events while most others were cutting back on travel and almost all other expenses. They knew business ran in cycles, and during the next upturn the company would be better positioned for growth and success than competitors chasing the quarterly bottom line. The owner of that company wasn’t a multi-billionaire for nothing, I’m guessing.

Calling Them As I See Them, and Looking for Help

Believe, me, I’m aware that the above might be perceived by some as an advertisement for the conference. But I’m an old-school, seasoned, professional journalist who has had ethics and objectivity drilled into me starting with high school journalism classes through a college journalism degree through decades of experience at several organizations. I call them as I see them in both news articles and opinion pieces like this blog post.

So that’s what I saw and learned. And based on that, I want to do better in serving our readers. Please share your thoughts on the site’s contents – what you like, what you don’t like, what you’d like to see more of. Please comment below or drop me a line.

#visual studio #visual studio code #code #develop

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Notes from Visual Studio Live! No Typical Developer
Brain  Crist

Brain Crist

1597028400

Notes from Visual Studio Live! No Typical Developer

As the newly incumbent editor in chief of this online magazine, I eagerly anticipated attending the recent Visual Studio Live! conference in Orlando.

I looked forward to the opportunity to mingle with developers, talk about their concerns, their motivations, their challenges, their likes and dislikes of working within the Microsoft developer environment.

Basically, I wanted to talk to the folks on the front lines to help me align our coverage with what they want and need.

And that’s exactly what I did, engaging with attendees at every opportunity: over coffee and danish during breaks between sessions, over meals, during social/networking events and so on.

The main – and also enlightening and somewhat surprising – takeaway was this: There’s no typical developer who comes to these conferences, this one being part of a larger Live! 360 event.

Following are some notes on this and other insights I gleaned from the nearly one-week conference.

No Typical Developer

For some reason, I envisioned a typical developer profile of a roughly 30-something male working at a midsize/large enterprise with a sizeable developer contingent and supporting staff.

I found those, but I also talked to women, senior devs – much experienced folks with decades of experience – and even some who served as almost one-person dev shops, responsible for just about everything in the workflow, even including handling “help desk” calls.

Budget Constraints

In the mainstream media, I’m continually told the economy is booming, that America is being made great again and companies are thriving in the new order, spending their newfound largesse and increasing investments.

What I found is quite different. Attendee after attendee mentioned tight budget constraints and scarce resources and support. Everybody seems to be struggling to make do with what they have, and they attended Visual Studio Live! to learn about tools and techniques that can help them get their jobs done easier and cheaper.

Not that Cutting Edge

I continually write about the new, the previews, the betas, the next greatest, cutting-edge wonder tool coming down the pike. Many of our commissioned hands-on tutorials deal with the same.

What I found, however, is many developers more concerned with the here-and-now caretaking of existing and legacy technologies. One developer had to maintain four different versions of Visual Studio because of the hodgepodge of disparate systems and components that they separately had to tie into. (I admit that sounds odd to me. It seems there should be some way to use just one version for all the functionality needed, but I didn’t get an opportunity to delve into the details for why this approach was needed, unfortunately.)

At a panel discussion presentation, few in the audience were familiar with Progressive Web Apps, an initiative I’ve written about multiple times – something I thought was the wave of the future in the mobile space, familiar to just about everyone. That wasn’t the case for this and several other newer or cutting-edge technologies. Some coders were interested in this new-fangled Xamarin thing, for example (I thought it was a popular, well-known adjunct to the Visual Studio experience).

This tells me to review our coverage strategies to determine the correct mix of content. To go beyond examining the latest previews and betas and include more about the here-and-now challenges faced by devs on a daily basis.

To be fair, several of our commissioned hands-on tutorial experts do touch on the established tools and techniques along with the latest iPhone X dev tips and such. But perhaps we need to do more entrenched, legacy stuff. You tell me in the comments section of this article or via e-mail (address at the end).

Foresighted Companies

Related to the aforementioned budget constraints, I found it interesting that even small companies were sending their developers to Visual Studio Live! Even though times are seemingly still tough for many, firms of all sizes are sending developers to learn how to do their jobs better.

More than one attendee said their bosses (actually some of them were bosses) see it as an investment for the future. The initial cost, they believe, will be more than offset by productivity gains and new initiatives or techniques that will directly affect the bottom line.

I worked for a successful media conglomerate during the lean mid-2000s that followed the same philosophy, sending me and other staffers to educational and professional events while most others were cutting back on travel and almost all other expenses. They knew business ran in cycles, and during the next upturn the company would be better positioned for growth and success than competitors chasing the quarterly bottom line. The owner of that company wasn’t a multi-billionaire for nothing, I’m guessing.

Calling Them As I See Them, and Looking for Help

Believe, me, I’m aware that the above might be perceived by some as an advertisement for the conference. But I’m an old-school, seasoned, professional journalist who has had ethics and objectivity drilled into me starting with high school journalism classes through a college journalism degree through decades of experience at several organizations. I call them as I see them in both news articles and opinion pieces like this blog post.

So that’s what I saw and learned. And based on that, I want to do better in serving our readers. Please share your thoughts on the site’s contents – what you like, what you don’t like, what you’d like to see more of. Please comment below or drop me a line.

#visual studio #visual studio code #code #develop

Fredy  Larson

Fredy Larson

1595059664

How long does it take to develop/build an app?

With more of us using smartphones, the popularity of mobile applications has exploded. In the digital era, the number of people looking for products and services online is growing rapidly. Smartphone owners look for mobile applications that give them quick access to companies’ products and services. As a result, mobile apps provide customers with a lot of benefits in just one device.

Likewise, companies use mobile apps to increase customer loyalty and improve their services. Mobile Developers are in high demand as companies use apps not only to create brand awareness but also to gather information. For that reason, mobile apps are used as tools to collect valuable data from customers to help companies improve their offer.

There are many types of mobile applications, each with its own advantages. For example, native apps perform better, while web apps don’t need to be customized for the platform or operating system (OS). Likewise, hybrid apps provide users with comfortable user experience. However, you may be wondering how long it takes to develop an app.

To give you an idea of how long the app development process takes, here’s a short guide.

App Idea & Research

app-idea-research

_Average time spent: two to five weeks _

This is the initial stage and a crucial step in setting the project in the right direction. In this stage, you brainstorm ideas and select the best one. Apart from that, you’ll need to do some research to see if your idea is viable. Remember that coming up with an idea is easy; the hard part is to make it a reality.

All your ideas may seem viable, but you still have to run some tests to keep it as real as possible. For that reason, when Web Developers are building a web app, they analyze the available ideas to see which one is the best match for the targeted audience.

Targeting the right audience is crucial when you are developing an app. It saves time when shaping the app in the right direction as you have a clear set of objectives. Likewise, analyzing how the app affects the market is essential. During the research process, App Developers must gather information about potential competitors and threats. This helps the app owners develop strategies to tackle difficulties that come up after the launch.

The research process can take several weeks, but it determines how successful your app can be. For that reason, you must take your time to know all the weaknesses and strengths of the competitors, possible app strategies, and targeted audience.

The outcomes of this stage are app prototypes and the minimum feasible product.

#android app #frontend #ios app #minimum viable product (mvp) #mobile app development #web development #android app development #app development #app development for ios and android #app development process #ios and android app development #ios app development #stages in app development

Mitchel  Carter

Mitchel Carter

1602979200

Developer Career Path: To Become a Team Lead or Stay a Developer?

For a developer, becoming a team leader can be a trap or open up opportunities for creating software. Two years ago, when I was a developer, I was thinking, “I want to be a team leader. It’s so cool, he’s in charge of everything and gets more money. It’s the next step after a senior.” Back then, no one could tell me how wrong I was. I had to find it out myself.

I Got to Be a Team Leader — Twice

I’m naturally very organized. Whatever I do, I try to put things in order, create systems and processes. So I’ve always been inclined to take on more responsibilities than just coding. My first startup job, let’s call it T, was complete chaos in terms of development processes.

Now I probably wouldn’t work in a place like that, but at the time, I enjoyed the vibe. Just imagine it — numerous clients and a team leader who set tasks to the developers in person (and often privately). We would often miss deadlines and had to work late. Once, my boss called and asked me to come back to work at 8 p.m. to finish one feature — all because the deadline was “the next morning.” But at T, we were a family.

We also did everything ourselves — or at least tried to. I’ll never forget how I had to install Ubuntu on a rack server that we got from one of our investors. When I would turn it on, it sounded like a helicopter taking off!

At T, I became a CTO and managed a team of 10 people. So it was my first experience as a team leader.

Then I came to work at D — as a developer. And it was so different in every way when it came to processes.

They employed classic Scrum with sprints, burndown charts, demos, story points, planning, and backlog grooming. I was amazed by the quality of processes, but at first, I was just coding and minding my own business. Then I became friends with the Scrum master. I would ask him lots of questions, and he would willingly answer them and recommend good books.

My favorite was Scrum and XP from the Trenches by Henrik Kniberg. The process at D was based on its methods. As a result, both managers and sellers knew when to expect the result.

Then I joined Skyeng, also as a developer. Unlike my other jobs, it excels at continuous integration with features shipped every day. Within my team, we used a Kanban-like method.

We were also lucky to have our team leader, Petya. At our F2F meetings, we could discuss anything, from missing deadlines to setting up a task tracker. Sometimes I would just give feedback or he would give me advice.

That’s how Petya got to know I’d had some management experience at T and learned Scrum at D.

So one day, he offered me to host a stand-up.

#software-development #developer #dev-team-leadership #agile-software-development #web-development #mobile-app-development #ios-development #android-development

United States

United States

1617019013

Top Live Streaming Application Development Company | San Francisco Bangalore Mumbai

A basic cross-platform (web, mobile, work area) Video conferencing application software development solution that permits video chat, messaging and a lot more features without the establishment of any extra software. The StreamingApp will give you a personalized media experience. showing you content that is tailored to your preferences. The Live streaming app development builder enables your users to stream movies, television, live events, broadcasts and music.

While planning the video streaming app development, we ensure the applications are appealing, simple to-utilize and immaculate for your application clients.
The incredible application has the capacities to watch live TV streaming as sports, entertainment, series and other substance through amazing media.

Why Live Streaming?
Modern people are no longer committed to TV listings, they choose to access media based on personal schedules. Add to this user-friendly interface, highest-resolution picture, and plenty of user-oriented features, and you’ll realize why streaming apps are here to stay.

Feature of Live Streaming App:
User Login
Personalized Profiles
Push Notifications
Diverse Streaming Functionality
Channel Subscriptions
Stream Recording and Storage

Live Streaming App Development Company we offer:
Live streaming app development
Video conferencing
OTT apps
Training education
Live streaming
Tracking
Browse and organize
Private and public playlists

Why Fortunesoft?
Fortunesoft, an end-to-end application development company, provides digital technology solutions for the global clientele. We are a digital solution company that focuses on deep tech and innovative practices to craft high-end applications with our top-notch digital technology services. We leverage the benefits of disruptive technologies in providing top solutions, making us a leading software application development company in the market.

Want to get more info:
Call us : +1-615-298-7395
Mail us : contact@fortunesoftit.com

#live video streaming app development #video streaming application development #video streaming mobile app development #live video streaming app development solutions #live streaming app development solutions

Juanita  Apio

Juanita Apio

1618243440

[Guest post] Learn C# with Visual Studio, Visual Studio for Mac, and Unity

UPDATE: The book giveaway challenge is complete. We will be announcing winners on the Visual Studio blog within the next week. Thank you for your submissions!

Visual Studio is an amazing development tool. But Visual Studio and Visual Studio for Mac are more than just intuitive, state-of-the-art development environments. They’re also remarkably powerful learning and exploration tools, with features to help you create and understand your code. I love teaching and learning about C## with Visual Studio. That’s why my co-author, Jenny Greene, and I put Visual Studio and Visual Studio for Mac right at the center of our latest book, _Head First C# _(4th edition), published by O’Reilly Media. _Head First C# _incorporates Visual Studio directly in the learning. combining Visual Studio with the unique and innovative “brain-friendly” Head First approach to teaching helps us make learning C## easier and more fun for our readers.

#visual studio #c# #unity #visual studio 2019 for mac #visual studio for mac