A new thing for Javascript and Node.js. What’s wrong with NPM?

A new thing for Javascript and Node.js. What’s wrong with NPM?

Why does the world need another package manager / what’s wrong with npm? JavaScript is an exemplar of a larger problem: code reuse via artifacts with dependency metadata delivered by a registry that controls namespaces and versioning

Why does the world need another package manager / what’s wrong with npm? JavaScript is an exemplar of a larger problem: code reuse via artifacts with dependency metadata delivered by a registry that controls namespaces and versioning. Registries are poised to provide functionality for communities: security assurances, static analysis, invariants around version availability, user support. JS is special because it has the largest registry and the most code reuse in the wild, but other communities need this too.

Docker. Rust. Ruby. Python. This is a problem that communities keep solving and re-solving. There hasn’t been a satisfactory answer to the problem of funding. Money is ultimately what supports these gossamer webs of packages. Without money, that web disintegrates. At JavaScript’s scale, the money it takes to support the web is enormous. Further, there’s value in expanding this web, and that means more language communities will contribute to this web over time, making it yet more expensive to support. We could give this web to a company with deep pockets, but we’re placing a lot of trust in an entity that’s not entirely incentivized to keep our best interests at heart.

So, the question is: how do we make this web of packages less expensive as it gets bigger? How do we preserve community control of that web? How do we earn the trust of other language communities, so we can solve the problem of artifact dependencies once and reap the benefits across all languages? We think Entropic is the answer: federated registries and distributed trust recast this ephemeral web of packages in diamond, adamant and self-supporting.

Speaker: Chris Dickinson

javascript node nodejs npm

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