Figma Dev

Figma Dev

1620803760

Tiny Tots Have Thoughts Too! - Mischelle Mulia (Config 2021)

Mischelle walks us through how her team runs user research with children (ages 6-9) at Clever. She shares their experiences of setting up kid-approved spaces in our office (pre-COVID), running remote user interviews with kids, and designing kid-centric diary studies. Walk away with Clever’s kid-testing principles, so you too can design great products for kids.

Check out Mischelle’s slides on the Community here: https://www.figma.com/community/file/966742089142501700

  • 0:00 About Mischelle
  • 1:02 About Clever
  • 2:17 How does Clever do research with kids?
  • 3:34 Crafting a safe environment
  • 10:00 Digging deeper
  • 17:15 Made for kids
  • 22:11 What did we learn?
  • 22:34 One last story

#figma

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Tiny Tots Have Thoughts Too! - Mischelle Mulia (Config 2021)

Asset Sync: Synchronises Assets Between Rails and S3

Asset Sync

Synchronises Assets between Rails and S3.

Asset Sync is built to run with the new Rails Asset Pipeline feature introduced in Rails 3.1. After you run bundle exec rake assets:precompile your assets will be synchronised to your S3 bucket, optionally deleting unused files and only uploading the files it needs to.

This was initially built and is intended to work on Heroku but can work on any platform.

Upgrading?

Upgraded from 1.x? Read UPGRADING.md

Installation

Since 2.x, Asset Sync depends on gem fog-core instead of fog.
This is due to fog is including many unused storage provider gems as its dependencies.

Asset Sync has no idea about what provider will be used,
so you are responsible for bundling the right gem for the provider to be used.

In your Gemfile:

gem "asset_sync"
gem "fog-aws"

Or, to use Azure Blob storage, configure as this.

gem "asset_sync"
gem "gitlab-fog-azure-rm"

# This gem seems unmaintianed
# gem "fog-azure-rm"

To use Backblaze B2, insert these.

gem "asset_sync"
gem "fog-backblaze"

Extended Installation (Faster sync with turbosprockets)

It's possible to improve asset:precompile time if you are using Rails 3.2.x the main source of which being compilation of non-digest assets.

turbo-sprockets-rails3 solves this by only compiling digest assets. Thus cutting compile time in half.

NOTE: It will be deprecated in Rails 4 as sprockets-rails has been extracted out of Rails and will only compile digest assets by default.

Configuration

Rails

Configure config/environments/production.rb to use Amazon S3 as the asset host and ensure precompiling is enabled.

  #config/environments/production.rb
  config.action_controller.asset_host = "//#{ENV['FOG_DIRECTORY']}.s3.amazonaws.com"

Or, to use Google Storage Cloud, configure as this.

  #config/environments/production.rb
  config.action_controller.asset_host = "//#{ENV['FOG_DIRECTORY']}.storage.googleapis.com"

Or, to use Azure Blob storage, configure as this.

  #config/environments/production.rb
  config.action_controller.asset_host = "//#{ENV['AZURE_STORAGE_ACCOUNT_NAME']}.blob.core.windows.net/#{ENV['FOG_DIRECTORY']}"

Or, to use Backblaze B2, configure as this.

  #config/environments/production.rb
  config.action_controller.asset_host = "//f000.backblazeb2.com/file/#{ENV['FOG_DIRECTORY']}"

On HTTPS: the exclusion of any protocol in the asset host declaration above will allow browsers to choose the transport mechanism on the fly. So if your application is available under both HTTP and HTTPS the assets will be served to match.

The only caveat with this is that your S3 bucket name must not contain any periods so, mydomain.com.s3.amazonaws.com for example would not work under HTTPS as SSL certificates from Amazon would interpret our bucket name as not a subdomain of s3.amazonaws.com, but a multi level subdomain. To avoid this don't use a period in your subdomain or switch to the other style of S3 URL.

  config.action_controller.asset_host = "//s3.amazonaws.com/#{ENV['FOG_DIRECTORY']}"

Or, to use Google Storage Cloud, configure as this.

  config.action_controller.asset_host = "//storage.googleapis.com/#{ENV['FOG_DIRECTORY']}"

Or, to use Azure Blob storage, configure as this.

  #config/environments/production.rb
  config.action_controller.asset_host = "//#{ENV['AZURE_STORAGE_ACCOUNT_NAME']}.blob.core.windows.net/#{ENV['FOG_DIRECTORY']}"

On non default S3 bucket region: If your bucket is set to a region that is not the default US Standard (us-east-1) you must use the first style of url //#{ENV['FOG_DIRECTORY']}.s3.amazonaws.com or amazon will return a 301 permanently moved when assets are requested. Note the caveat above about bucket names and periods.

If you wish to have your assets sync to a sub-folder of your bucket instead of into the root add the following to your production.rb file

  # store assets in a 'folder' instead of bucket root
  config.assets.prefix = "/production/assets"

Also, ensure the following are defined (in production.rb or application.rb)

  • config.assets.digest is set to true.
  • config.assets.enabled is set to true.

Additionally, if you depend on any configuration that is setup in your initializers you will need to ensure that

  • config.assets.initialize_on_precompile is set to true

AssetSync

AssetSync supports the following methods of configuration.

Using the Built-in Initializer is the default method and is supposed to be used with environment variables. It's the recommended approach for deployments on Heroku.

If you need more control over configuration you will want to use a custom rails initializer.

Configuration using a YAML file (a common strategy for Capistrano deployments) is also supported.

The recommend way to configure asset_sync is by using environment variables however it's up to you, it will work fine if you hard code them too. The main reason why using environment variables is recommended is so your access keys are not checked into version control.

Built-in Initializer (Environment Variables)

The Built-in Initializer will configure AssetSync based on the contents of your environment variables.

Add your configuration details to heroku

heroku config:add AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=xxxx
heroku config:add AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=xxxx
heroku config:add FOG_DIRECTORY=xxxx
heroku config:add FOG_PROVIDER=AWS
# and optionally:
heroku config:add FOG_REGION=eu-west-1
heroku config:add ASSET_SYNC_GZIP_COMPRESSION=true
heroku config:add ASSET_SYNC_MANIFEST=true
heroku config:add ASSET_SYNC_EXISTING_REMOTE_FILES=keep

Or add to a traditional unix system

export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=xxxx
export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=xxxx
export FOG_DIRECTORY=xxxx

Rackspace configuration is also supported

heroku config:add RACKSPACE_USERNAME=xxxx
heroku config:add RACKSPACE_API_KEY=xxxx
heroku config:add FOG_DIRECTORY=xxxx
heroku config:add FOG_PROVIDER=Rackspace

Google Storage Cloud configuration is supported as well. The preferred option is using the GCS JSON API which requires that you create an appropriate service account, generate the signatures and make them accessible to asset sync at the prescribed location

heroku config:add FOG_PROVIDER=Google
heroku config:add GOOGLE_PROJECT=xxxx
heroku config:add GOOGLE_JSON_KEY_LOCATION=xxxx
heroku config:add FOG_DIRECTORY=xxxx

If using the S3 API the following config is required

heroku config:add FOG_PROVIDER=Google
heroku config:add GOOGLE_STORAGE_ACCESS_KEY_ID=xxxx
heroku config:add GOOGLE_STORAGE_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=xxxx
heroku config:add FOG_DIRECTORY=xxxx

The Built-in Initializer also sets the AssetSync default for existing_remote_files to keep.

Custom Rails Initializer (config/initializers/asset_sync.rb)

If you want to enable some of the advanced configuration options you will want to create your own initializer.

Run the included Rake task to generate a starting point.

rails g asset_sync:install --provider=Rackspace
rails g asset_sync:install --provider=AWS
rails g asset_sync:install --provider=AzureRM
rails g asset_sync:install --provider=Backblaze

The generator will create a Rails initializer at config/initializers/asset_sync.rb.

AssetSync.configure do |config|
  config.fog_provider = 'AWS'
  config.fog_directory = ENV['FOG_DIRECTORY']
  config.aws_access_key_id = ENV['AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID']
  config.aws_secret_access_key = ENV['AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY']
  config.aws_session_token = ENV['AWS_SESSION_TOKEN'] if ENV.key?('AWS_SESSION_TOKEN')

  # Don't delete files from the store
  # config.existing_remote_files = 'keep'
  #
  # Increase upload performance by configuring your region
  # config.fog_region = 'eu-west-1'
  #
  # Set `public` option when uploading file depending on value,
  # Setting to "default" makes asset sync skip setting the option
  # Possible values: true, false, "default" (default: true)
  # config.fog_public = true
  #
  # Change AWS signature version. Default is 4
  # config.aws_signature_version = 4
  #
  # Change canned ACL of uploaded object. Default is unset. Will override fog_public if set.
  # Choose from: private | public-read | public-read-write | aws-exec-read |
  #              authenticated-read | bucket-owner-read | bucket-owner-full-control 
  # config.aws_acl = nil 
  #
  # Change host option in fog (only if you need to)
  # config.fog_host = 's3.amazonaws.com'
  #
  # Change port option in fog (only if you need to)
  # config.fog_port = "9000"
  #
  # Use http instead of https.
  # config.fog_scheme = 'http'
  #
  # Automatically replace files with their equivalent gzip compressed version
  # config.gzip_compression = true
  #
  # Use the Rails generated 'manifest.yml' file to produce the list of files to
  # upload instead of searching the assets directory.
  # config.manifest = true
  #
  # Upload the manifest file also.
  # config.include_manifest = false
  #
  # Upload files concurrently
  # config.concurrent_uploads = false
  #
  # Number of threads when concurrent_uploads is enabled
  # config.concurrent_uploads_max_threads = 10
  #
  # Path to cache file to skip scanning remote
  # config.remote_file_list_cache_file_path = './.asset_sync_remote_file_list_cache.json'
  #
  # Fail silently.  Useful for environments such as Heroku
  # config.fail_silently = true
  #
  # Log silently. Default is `true`. But you can set it to false if more logging message are preferred.
  # Logging messages are sent to `STDOUT` when `log_silently` is falsy
  # config.log_silently = true
  #
  # Allow custom assets to be cacheable. Note: The base filename will be matched
  # If you have an asset with name `app.0b1a4cd3.js`, only `app.0b1a4cd3` will need to be matched
  # only one of `cache_asset_regexp` or `cache_asset_regexps` is allowed.
  # config.cache_asset_regexp = /\.[a-f0-9]{8}$/i
  # config.cache_asset_regexps = [ /\.[a-f0-9]{8}$/i, /\.[a-f0-9]{20}$/i ]
end

YAML (config/asset_sync.yml)

Run the included Rake task to generate a starting point.

rails g asset_sync:install --use-yml --provider=Rackspace
rails g asset_sync:install --use-yml --provider=AWS
rails g asset_sync:install --use-yml --provider=AzureRM
rails g asset_sync:install --use-yml --provider=Backblaze

The generator will create a YAML file at config/asset_sync.yml.

defaults: &defaults
  fog_provider: "AWS"
  fog_directory: "rails-app-assets"
  aws_access_key_id: "<%= ENV['AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID'] %>"
  aws_secret_access_key: "<%= ENV['AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY'] %>"

  # To use AWS reduced redundancy storage.
  # aws_reduced_redundancy: true
  #
  # You may need to specify what region your storage bucket is in
  # fog_region: "eu-west-1"
  #
  # Change AWS signature version. Default is 4
  # aws_signature_version: 4
  #
  # Change canned ACL of uploaded object. Default is unset. Will override fog_public if set.
  # Choose from: private | public-read | public-read-write | aws-exec-read |
  #              authenticated-read | bucket-owner-read | bucket-owner-full-control 
  # aws_acl: null
  #
  # Change host option in fog (only if you need to)
  # fog_host: "s3.amazonaws.com"
  #
  # Use http instead of https. Default should be "https" (at least for fog-aws)
  # fog_scheme: "http"

  existing_remote_files: keep # Existing pre-compiled assets on S3 will be kept
  # To delete existing remote files.
  # existing_remote_files: delete
  # To ignore existing remote files and overwrite.
  # existing_remote_files: ignore
  # Automatically replace files with their equivalent gzip compressed version
  # gzip_compression: true
  # Fail silently.  Useful for environments such as Heroku
  # fail_silently: true
  # Always upload. Useful if you want to overwrite specific remote assets regardless of their existence
  #  eg: Static files in public often reference non-fingerprinted application.css
  #  note: You will still need to expire them from the CDN's edge cache locations
  # always_upload: ['application.js', 'application.css', !ruby/regexp '/application-/\d{32}\.css/']
  # Ignored files. Useful if there are some files that are created dynamically on the server and you don't want to upload on deploy.
  # ignored_files: ['ignore_me.js', !ruby/regexp '/ignore_some/\d{32}\.css/']
  # Allow custom assets to be cacheable. Note: The base filename will be matched
  # If you have an asset with name "app.0b1a4cd3.js", only "app.0b1a4cd3" will need to be matched
  # cache_asset_regexps: ['cache_me.js', !ruby/regexp '/cache_some\.\d{8}\.css/']

development:
  <<: *defaults

test:
  <<: *defaults

production:
  <<: *defaults

Available Configuration Options

Most AssetSync configuration can be modified directly using environment variables with the Built-in initializer. e.g.

AssetSync.config.fog_provider == ENV['FOG_PROVIDER']

Simply upcase the ruby attribute names to get the equivalent environment variable to set. The only exception to that rule are the internal AssetSync config variables, they must be prepended with ASSET_SYNC_* e.g.

AssetSync.config.gzip_compression == ENV['ASSET_SYNC_GZIP_COMPRESSION']

AssetSync (optional)

  • existing_remote_files: ('keep', 'delete', 'ignore') what to do with previously precompiled files. default: 'keep'
  • gzip_compression: (true, false) when enabled, will automatically replace files that have a gzip compressed equivalent with the compressed version. default: 'false'
  • manifest: (true, false) when enabled, will use the manifest.yml generated by Rails to get the list of local files to upload. experimental. default: 'false'
  • include_manifest: (true, false) when enabled, will upload the manifest.yml generated by Rails. default: 'false'
  • concurrent_uploads: (true, false) when enabled, will upload the files in different Threads, this greatly improves the upload speed. default: 'false'
  • concurrent_uploads_max_threads: when concurrent_uploads is enabled, this determines the number of threads that will be created. default: 10
  • remote_file_list_cache_file_path: if present, use this path to cache remote file list to skip scanning remote default: nil
  • enabled: (true, false) when false, will disable asset sync. default: 'true' (enabled)
  • ignored_files: an array of files to ignore e.g. ['ignore_me.js', %r(ignore_some/\d{32}\.css)] Useful if there are some files that are created dynamically on the server and you don't want to upload on deploy default: []
  • cache_asset_regexps: an array of files to add cache headers e.g. ['cache_me.js', %r(cache_some\.\d{8}\.css)] Useful if there are some files that are added to sprockets assets list and need to be set as 'Cacheable' on uploaded server. Only rails compiled regexp is matched internally default: []

Config Method add_local_file_paths

Adding local files by providing a block:

AssetSync.configure do |config|
  # The block should return an array of file paths
  config.add_local_file_paths do
    # Any code that returns paths of local asset files to be uploaded
    # Like Webpacker
    public_root = Rails.root.join("public")
    Dir.chdir(public_root) do
      packs_dir = Webpacker.config.public_output_path.relative_path_from(public_root)
      Dir[File.join(packs_dir, '/**/**')]
    end
  end
end

The blocks are run when local files are being scanned and uploaded

Config Method file_ext_to_mime_type_overrides

It's reported that mime-types 3.x returns application/ecmascript instead of application/javascript
Such change of mime type might cause some CDN to disable asset compression
So this gem has defined a default override for file ext js to be mapped to application/javascript by default

To customize the overrides:

AssetSync.configure do |config|
  # Clear the default overrides
  config.file_ext_to_mime_type_overrides.clear

  # Add/Edit overrides
  # Will call `#to_s` for inputs
  config.file_ext_to_mime_type_overrides.add(:js, :"application/x-javascript")
end

The blocks are run when local files are being scanned and uploaded

Fog (Required)

  • fog_provider: your storage provider AWS (S3) or Rackspace (Cloud Files) or Google (Google Storage) or AzureRM (Azure Blob) or Backblaze (Backblaze B2)
  • fog_directory: your bucket name

Fog (Optional)

  • fog_region: the region your storage bucket is in e.g. eu-west-1 (AWS), ord (Rackspace), japanwest (Azure Blob)
  • fog_path_style: To use buckets with dot in names, check fog/fog#2381 (comment)

AWS

  • aws_access_key_id: your Amazon S3 access key
  • aws_secret_access_key: your Amazon S3 access secret
  • aws_acl: set canned ACL of uploaded object, will override fog_public if set

Rackspace

  • rackspace_username: your Rackspace username
  • rackspace_api_key: your Rackspace API Key.

Google Storage

When using the JSON API

  • google_project: your Google Cloud Project name where the Google Cloud Storage bucket resides
  • google_json_key_location: path to the location of the service account key. The service account key must be a JSON type key

When using the S3 API

  • google_storage_access_key_id: your Google Storage access key
  • google_storage_secret_access_key: your Google Storage access secret

Azure Blob

  • azure_storage_account_name: your Azure Blob access key
  • azure_storage_access_key: your Azure Blob access secret

Backblaze B2

  • b2_key_id: Your Backblaze B2 key ID
  • b2_key_token: Your Backblaze B2 key token
  • b2_bucket_id: Your Backblaze B2 bucket ID

Rackspace (Optional)

  • rackspace_auth_url: Rackspace auth URL, for Rackspace London use: https://lon.identity.api.rackspacecloud.com/v2.0

Amazon S3 Multiple Region Support

If you are using anything other than the US buckets with S3 then you'll want to set the region. For example with an EU bucket you could set the following environment variable.

heroku config:add FOG_REGION=eu-west-1

Or via a custom initializer

AssetSync.configure do |config|
  # ...
  config.fog_region = 'eu-west-1'
end

Or via YAML

production:  # ...  fog_region: 'eu-west-1'

Amazon (AWS) IAM Users

Amazon has switched to the more secure IAM User security policy model. When generating a user & policy for asset_sync you must ensure the policy has the following permissions, or you'll see the error:

Expected(200) <=> Actual(403 Forbidden)

IAM User Policy Example with minimum require permissions (replace bucket_name with your bucket):

{
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Action": "s3:ListBucket",
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::bucket_name"
    },
    {
      "Action": "s3:PutObject*",
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::bucket_name/*"
    }
  ]
}

If you want to use IAM roles you must set config.aws_iam_roles = true in your initializers.

AssetSync.configure do |config|
  # ...
  config.aws_iam_roles = true
end

Automatic gzip compression

With the gzip_compression option enabled, when uploading your assets. If a file has a gzip compressed equivalent we will replace that asset with the compressed version and sets the correct headers for S3 to serve it. For example, if you have a file master.css and it was compressed to master.css.gz we will upload the .gz file to S3 in place of the uncompressed file.

If the compressed file is actually larger than the uncompressed file we will ignore this rule and upload the standard uncompressed version.

Fail Silently

With the fail_silently option enabled, when running rake assets:precompile AssetSync will never throw an error due to missing configuration variables.

With the new user_env_compile feature of Heroku (see above), this is no longer required or recommended. Yet was added for the following reasons:

With Rails 3.1 on the Heroku cedar stack, the deployment process automatically runs rake assets:precompile. If you are using ENV variable style configuration. Due to the methods with which Heroku compile slugs, there will be an error raised by asset_sync as the environment is not available. This causes heroku to install the rails31_enable_runtime_asset_compilation plugin which is not necessary when using asset_sync and also massively slows down the first incoming requests to your app.

To prevent this part of the deploy from failing (asset_sync raising a config error), but carry on as normal set fail_silently to true in your configuration and ensure to run heroku run rake assets:precompile after deploy.

Rake Task

A rake task is included within the asset_sync gem to perform the sync:

  namespace :assets do
    desc "Synchronize assets to S3"
    task :sync => :environment do
      AssetSync.sync
    end
  end

If AssetSync.config.run_on_precompile is true (default), then assets will be uploaded to S3 automatically after the assets:precompile rake task is invoked:

  if Rake::Task.task_defined?("assets:precompile:nondigest")
    Rake::Task["assets:precompile:nondigest"].enhance do
      Rake::Task["assets:sync"].invoke if defined?(AssetSync) && AssetSync.config.run_on_precompile
    end
  else
    Rake::Task["assets:precompile"].enhance do
      Rake::Task["assets:sync"].invoke if defined?(AssetSync) && AssetSync.config.run_on_precompile
    end
  end

You can disable this behavior by setting AssetSync.config.run_on_precompile = false.

Sinatra/Rack Support

You can use the gem with any Rack application, but you must specify two additional options; prefix and public_path.

AssetSync.configure do |config|
  config.fog_provider = 'AWS'
  config.fog_directory = ENV['FOG_DIRECTORY']
  config.aws_access_key_id = ENV['AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID']
  config.aws_secret_access_key = ENV['AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY']
  config.prefix = 'assets'
  # Can be a `Pathname` or `String`
  # Will be converted into an `Pathname`
  # If relative, will be converted into an absolute path
  # via `::Rails.root` or `::Dir.pwd`
  config.public_path = Pathname('./public')
end

Then manually call AssetSync.sync at the end of your asset precompilation task.

namespace :assets do
  desc 'Precompile assets'
  task :precompile do
    target = Pathname('./public/assets')
    manifest = Sprockets::Manifest.new(sprockets, './public/assets/manifest.json')

    sprockets.each_logical_path do |logical_path|
      if (!File.extname(logical_path).in?(['.js', '.css']) || logical_path =~ /application\.(css|js)$/) && asset = sprockets.find_asset(logical_path)
        filename = target.join(logical_path)
        FileUtils.mkpath(filename.dirname)
        puts "Write asset: #{filename}"
        asset.write_to(filename)
        manifest.compile(logical_path)
      end
    end

    AssetSync.sync
  end
end

Webpacker (> 2.0) support

  1. Add webpacker files and disable run_on_precompile:
AssetSync.configure do |config|
  # Disable automatic run on precompile in order to attach to webpacker rake task
  config.run_on_precompile = false
  # The block should return an array of file paths
  config.add_local_file_paths do
    # Support webpacker assets
    public_root = Rails.root.join("public")
    Dir.chdir(public_root) do
      packs_dir = Webpacker.config.public_output_path.relative_path_from(public_root)
      Dir[File.join(packs_dir, '/**/**')]
    end
  end
end
  1. Add a asset_sync.rake in your lib/tasks directory that enhances the correct task, otherwise asset_sync runs before webpacker:compile does:
if defined?(AssetSync)
  Rake::Task['webpacker:compile'].enhance do
    Rake::Task["assets:sync"].invoke
  end
end

Caveat

By adding local files outside the normal Rails assets directory, the uploading part works, however checking that the asset was previously uploaded is not working because asset_sync is only fetching the files in the assets directory on the remote bucket. This will mean additional time used to upload the same assets again on every precompilation.

Running the specs

Make sure you have a .env file with these details:-

# for AWS provider
AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=<yourkeyid>
AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=<yoursecretkey>
FOG_DIRECTORY=<yourbucket>
FOG_REGION=<youbucketregion>

# for AzureRM provider
AZURE_STORAGE_ACCOUNT_NAME=<youraccountname>
AZURE_STORAGE_ACCESS_KEY=<youraccesskey>
FOG_DIRECTORY=<yourcontainer>
FOG_REGION=<yourcontainerregion>

Make sure the bucket has read/write permissions. Then to run the tests:-

foreman run rake

Todo

  1. Add some before and after filters for deleting and uploading
  2. Support more cloud storage providers
  3. Better test coverage
  4. Add rake tasks to clean old assets from a bucket

Credits

Inspired by:

License

MIT License. Copyright 2011-2013 Rumble Labs Ltd. rumblelabs.com


Author: AssetSync
Source code: https://github.com/AssetSync/asset_sync
License:

#ruby   #ruby-on-rails 

Alex Riley

Alex Riley

1607510226

Best Web App Ideas To Make Money In 2021 - Application Startup Guide

Some Popular Web App Ideas for 2021

Are you looking for best web application business ideas that make money in 2021?

There are lots of simple web app ideas but all those web application business ideas do not make money.

Read More

#trending web app ideas 2021 #trending web application ideas 2021 #web application ideas 2021 #web app ideas 2021 #new web app ideas 2021 #evergreen web app ideas 2021

Figma Dev

Figma Dev

1620803760

Tiny Tots Have Thoughts Too! - Mischelle Mulia (Config 2021)

Mischelle walks us through how her team runs user research with children (ages 6-9) at Clever. She shares their experiences of setting up kid-approved spaces in our office (pre-COVID), running remote user interviews with kids, and designing kid-centric diary studies. Walk away with Clever’s kid-testing principles, so you too can design great products for kids.

Check out Mischelle’s slides on the Community here: https://www.figma.com/community/file/966742089142501700

  • 0:00 About Mischelle
  • 1:02 About Clever
  • 2:17 How does Clever do research with kids?
  • 3:34 Crafting a safe environment
  • 10:00 Digging deeper
  • 17:15 Made for kids
  • 22:11 What did we learn?
  • 22:34 One last story

#figma

Harry Patel

Harry Patel

1614145832

A Complete Process to Create an App in 2021

It’s 2021, everything is getting replaced by a technologically emerged ecosystem, and mobile apps are one of the best examples to convey this message.

Though bypassing times, the development structure of mobile app has also been changed, but if you still follow the same process to create a mobile app for your business, then you are losing a ton of opportunities by not giving top-notch mobile experience to your users, which your competitors are doing.

You are about to lose potential existing customers you have, so what’s the ideal solution to build a successful mobile app in 2021?

This article will discuss how to build a mobile app in 2021 to help out many small businesses, startups & entrepreneurs by simplifying the mobile app development process for their business.

The first thing is to EVALUATE your mobile app IDEA means how your mobile app will change your target audience’s life and why your mobile app only can be the solution to their problem.

Now you have proposed a solution to a specific audience group, now start to think about the mobile app functionalities, the features would be in it, and simple to understand user interface with impressive UI designs.

From designing to development, everything is covered at this point; now, focus on a prelaunch marketing plan to create hype for your mobile app’s targeted audience, which will help you score initial downloads.

Boom, you are about to cross a particular download to generate a specific revenue through your mobile app.

#create an app in 2021 #process to create an app in 2021 #a complete process to create an app in 2021 #complete process to create an app in 2021 #process to create an app #complete process to create an app

Harry Patel

Harry Patel

1617962958

How to Hire App Developers in India?

To build a robust mobile application, a business needs to identify certain KPIs of a cutting-edge mobile app development approach that aligns with their business’s brand image and also offers economical mobile application development for their business mobile app.

For that, a business has to partner with an app development firm that provides end-to-end mobile app development services or hires app developers to fulfill their customized needs.

Furthermore, which way to opt totally depends on your entire mobile app development budget, as hiring a mobile app development company could be cost expensive, whereas moving forward by hiring app developers could be way economical.

The quality of app development would be similar, as the standards & protocols followed by an app development company or individual professionals are similar. Therefore, hiring mobile app developers would be convenient for a startup or a business that doesn’t have huge funds to spend on mobile app development.

If you are a small business or a startup, in this article, I will help you out with a budget-friendly mobile app development approach by teaching you people out how to hire app developers in India to scale up your business online by the end of 2021.

So if you are a small business owner or, as mentioned earlier, a startup, stick around until the end; you will learn key aspects of hiring app developers from India at cost-effective rates and similar mobile app development quality when partnering with mobile app development companies across the world.

To Hire app developers in India, a business needs to identify certain key performing indicators.

Those indicators will clarify which app development partner to move forward with for your business app development and which app developers would be able to cater to comprehensively throughout the app development process.

Get the Overview of their Expertise
Lookout at the Previous Work
Contact Their Clients

Now let us break down the above points in a brief to understand why these aspects play an essential part in building a successful mobile application for your business.

  • Get the Overview of their Expertise

The first thing a business needs to identify their hired mobile app development firm’s expertise, the technology stacks they use, what mobile app development tools they leverage while building a mobile application & how they streamline the entire mobile app development workflow.

While going through their entire mobile app development cycle, you will see if they are a perfect fit that can fulfill your app development needs or are just promising to moons and stars.

Walking with them helps you understand how your mobile app development project would be a tackle, so you can focus on other prospects of making your mobile app successful.

  • Lookout at the Previous Work

Taking a clear look at their previous work will give you surety of their working capabilities and what solution they can bring while working with you.

Therefore, go through their previous work, analyze the development structures, and designing patterns they follow to create an immersive user-experienced mobile app for their partners.

Once you are sure about their expertise and their prior projects, have ensured they could be the perfect fit for your project.

Don’t believe the depth of water by looking at the tip of the iceberg. Go ahead and see how deep it’s been.

  • Contact Their Clients

Connect with their previous clients, and ask their feedback about the partnership they had with a firm you are planning to work with.

Doing this will assure all the inside out of that company, and you will have a thorough brief of how to deal with them and what steps are important while working with them.

Wrapping Up

All these above factors are only a few of the considerable aspects that a business needs to look at while hiring app developers from India to build a mobile app.

Numerous elements play a critical role while finding an appropriate mobile app developer for your project, though all the above-mentioned points top the list of how to hire app developers in India and what to look for while hiring mobile app developers in India.

If you have any questions regarding mobile app design and development, please drop them in the comment section.

I would love to answer them and help you out with them.

#hire app developers in 2021 #how to hire app developers in 2021 #hire app developers in 2021 from india #how to hire app developers in 2021 from india #why hire app developers in india #why hire app developers in india in 2021