The future of WebAssembly (WASM): the hardware-execution revolution!

This article will take you on a deep technical dive inside WebAssembly (Wasm)

This article will take you on a deep technical dive inside WebAssembly (Wasm).

We will be compiling a simple Rust program to Wasm, and then deploying it on a stand-alone Wasm Virtual Machine (called WAVM). We will also be writing a C program, and then compiling that to Wasm and deploying it on x86_64 hardware (macOS Catalina). The latter task will be performed using Fastly’s native WebAssembly compiler and runtime called Lucet.

Please note: This article is more than just a technical dive into Wasm. This article also discusses the future opportunities of Wasm, in a much broader context.

We will be discussing the use of Wasm as part of blockchain (global decentralised computing) implementations, hardware implementations (portable binaries) and service-oriented architecture (SOA) implementations.

By the end of this article you will have a good understanding of Wasm fundamentals. In addition, you will have learned how to access free resources which will help you to write, compile and execute your own hand written Wasm code. Let’s get started.

What is Wasm?

WASM is a machine-close, platform-independent, low-level, assembly-like language (Reiser and Bläser, 2017). Wasm addresses the problem of safe, fast, portable low-level code on the web (Rossberg et al., 2018).

The Wasm computational model is based on a stack machine, in that instructions manipulate values on an implicit operand stack, consuming (popping) argument values and producing or returning (pushing) result values (webassembly.github.io, 2019).

#webassembly #web-development #rust #c++

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The future of WebAssembly (WASM): the hardware-execution revolution!

The future of WebAssembly (WASM): the hardware-execution revolution!

This article will take you on a deep technical dive inside WebAssembly (Wasm)

This article will take you on a deep technical dive inside WebAssembly (Wasm).

We will be compiling a simple Rust program to Wasm, and then deploying it on a stand-alone Wasm Virtual Machine (called WAVM). We will also be writing a C program, and then compiling that to Wasm and deploying it on x86_64 hardware (macOS Catalina). The latter task will be performed using Fastly’s native WebAssembly compiler and runtime called Lucet.

Please note: This article is more than just a technical dive into Wasm. This article also discusses the future opportunities of Wasm, in a much broader context.

We will be discussing the use of Wasm as part of blockchain (global decentralised computing) implementations, hardware implementations (portable binaries) and service-oriented architecture (SOA) implementations.

By the end of this article you will have a good understanding of Wasm fundamentals. In addition, you will have learned how to access free resources which will help you to write, compile and execute your own hand written Wasm code. Let’s get started.

What is Wasm?

WASM is a machine-close, platform-independent, low-level, assembly-like language (Reiser and Bläser, 2017). Wasm addresses the problem of safe, fast, portable low-level code on the web (Rossberg et al., 2018).

The Wasm computational model is based on a stack machine, in that instructions manipulate values on an implicit operand stack, consuming (popping) argument values and producing or returning (pushing) result values (webassembly.github.io, 2019).

#webassembly #web-development #rust #c++

Cleora  Roob

Cleora Roob

1628220000

WEBASSEMBLY UNIT TESTING | Introduction to WebAssembly (WASM)

WEBASSEMBLY UNIT TESTING | Introduction to WebAssembly (WASM)

This video shows you how to unit test your WebAssembly (WASM) modules using the Jest unit testing framework. We will hand code a WASM module using WAT (WebAssembly Text Format) and then create unit tests for our module using Jest,

#wasm #webassembly

Cleora  Roob

Cleora Roob

1628133300

WEBASSEMBLY STACK MACHINE | Introduction to WebAssembly (WASM)

this video gives you a brief tutorial into webassembly and how the webassembly stack machine operates.

chris first shows you how webassembly does math calculations using stacks by hand, and then in javascript. we then hand code squares, echo, multiply, add, subtract functions in webassembly text format (WAT) and then compile into WASM and executing in node.js. this video will get you super deep into understanding how webassembly operates under the hood.

#webassembly #wasm #javascript

Dylan  Iqbal

Dylan Iqbal

1612879349

An Introduction to WebAssembly (WASM)

Want to write a web application? Better get familiar with JavaScript. JavaScript has long been the king of front-end. While there have been various attempts to dethrone it, they have typically involved treating JavaScript as an assembly-language analog that you transpile your code to. This has led to complex build pipelines that produce JavaScript which the browser has to parse and you still have to debug. But what if there were an actual byte-code language you could compile your non-JavaScript code to instead? That is what WebAssembly is.

In this session we will explain how WebAssembly works and how to use it. We’ll cover what it is, how it fits into your application, and how to build and use your own WebAssembly modules. And, we’ll demo how to build and use those modules with both Rust and the WebAssembly Text Format. That’s right, we’ll be live coding in an assembly language. We’ll also go over some online resources for other languages and tools that make use of WebAssembly.

When we’re done, you’ll have the footing you need to start building applications featuring WebAssembly. So grab a non-JavaScript language, a modern browser, and let’s get started!

#webassembly #developer #wasm #rust #javascript

Nigel  Uys

Nigel Uys

1622705632

WebAssembly is The Technology Of Future?

WebAssembly, generally called wasm, is a compact, fast and portable code that can run on most browsers which makes it a technology of the future. Let us learn more about it in this blog.

Introduction

"WebAssembly (abbreviated Wasm) is a binary instruction format for a stack-based virtual machine. Wasm is designed as a portable compilation target for programming languages, enabling deployment on the web for client and server applications."

This is the definition that I got from the  WebAssembly official web page. Let us break this definition up and understand it. It states that WebAssembly is a binary instruction format. This binary instruction format is similar to byte code in java. This code can not be understood by us but by a virtual machine which is next in our definition. A stack-based virtual machine is a virtual machine that considers the operands of all the instructions as they are on a stack. The next part of the definition tells that wasm is a compilation target for many programming languages. This is indeed true, many languages compile their code to wasm which makes it easier to transfer on the web for deployment purposes.

Understanding WebAssembly

To understand WebAssembly, we have to understand it from the very beginning when the computers were invented. At that time, to interact with the big-sized computers we needed to code in machine language, i.e., the language of 0s and 1s. It was quite difficult to code in that.

So we started coding in Hex symbols which were not quite helpful as it was also very difficult to code in Hex. We then started using assembly languages which made it somewhat easy to code as it was understandable by us. For example, LDX stood for load in the X register, similarly LDY for load in the Y register. So it was easier but for different species of microprocessors, we needed a different assembly language.

#rust #virtual machine #wasm #webassembly