Chaz  Homenick

Chaz Homenick

1595469600

Monolithic Decomposition and Implementing Microservices Architecture

“Microservices” is one of the most popular buzz-words in the field of software architecture. While our first article talks about the fundamentals and benefits of microservices, in this article we will explain how enterprises can implement microservices in real-world use cases by leveraging key architectural principles.

How to Start with Designing Microservices-Based Cloud Solution Architecture

Microservices-based solution architecture is not always the best fit for all use-cases, and using a one size fits all approach has several drawbacks. Before designing a microservices-based solution architecture, enterprise solution architects must address the following questions.

  1. Is microservices architecture a good fit for the solution?
  2. How should one define the microservices architecture?

While building microservices architecture for the first version of an application, we suggest going for a “monolithic” approach. This means you build your application in a simple way to validate your idea first. Then, you apply the principles included in this blog to scale and evolve your initial monolith into a microservices-based solution architecture.

There is no value in creating architecturally pure microservices that do not offer value back to the business. Monolithic Architecture patterns will help you to understand several issues and limitations about large and complex systems (that can possibly occur with Microservices architecture).

Monolithic to microservices

Once you have implemented your application using monolithic architecture, you need to consider the following development and operations patterns that you can apply in undertaking a microservices transformation.

1. Decomposition of The Application Into Services

Microservices architecture is a set of loosely coupled services and decomposition of the application into services plays a key role in microservices architecture implementation, deployment, and CI/CD.

Solution architects can define the decomposition methods based on need & solution, there are no “best” methods for decomposition but there are common methods, which can help you to decompose your solution in several services as mentioned below.

To apply decomposition, you need to understand the need & role of each component, weight/links between several components, and more factors for each component of the entire solution.

Decomposition Strategies

  1. Decompose by module/business capability: This method suggests defining each component for each module or feature i.e. messaging, logging, device communication, user management. This helps you to assign an entire feature/module to separate teams, where respective teams will be responsible for a module/feature.
  2. **Decompose by domain: **This method suggests defining the region where your solution is going to be deployed, and further defining the services to that region. Define services corresponding to Domain-Driven Design (DDD) subdomains. DDD refers to the application’s problem space - the business - as the domain. A domain consists of multiple subdomains. Each subdomain corresponds to a different part of the business. E.g. User Management, Device Management, Device Communication.

Things to consider while decomposition:

  • Find boundaries for each service and align them with business capabilities
  • Stay focused on defining the scope of the microservice, and not just shrinking the service. The (right) size of the service should be the required size to facilitate a given business capability
  • The Service should have very few operations/functionalities and a simple message format.
  • Make sure the microservices design ensures the agile/independent development and deployment of the service.
  • Each service must be testable and deployable individually.
  • Services must be cohesive. A service should implement a small set of strongly related functions.
  • Each service should be small enough so that it can be developed by a small team of 6-members
  • The application must be easy to understand and modify
  • The Service must be scalable in load balancer infrastructure like ELB

**2. Microservices Discovery and Registration **

The microservice architecture uses the service registryto maintain the location of service to send requests, and this registry can be managed on the server-side or client-side. The Service can register itself or via a third party (deployment scripts) can register the service. Each service should register itself on the registry on service bootup with a health check interface.

Health check interfaces help the registry check for service availability. While defining the service registry you must implement a mechanism that enables the clients of the service to make requests to a dynamically changing set of ephemeral service instances.

#microservices #monolithic architecture #legacy applications #microservices implementation #decomposition

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Monolithic Decomposition and Implementing Microservices Architecture
Chaz  Homenick

Chaz Homenick

1595465954

Monolithic Decomposition and Implementing Microservices Architecture

“Microservices” is one of the most popular buzz-words in the field of software architecture. While our first article talks about the fundamentals and benefits of microservices, in this article we will explain how enterprises can implement microservices in real-world use cases by leveraging key architectural principles.

How to Start with Designing Microservices-Based Cloud Solution Architecture

Microservices-based solution architecture is not always the best fit for all use-cases, and using a one size fits all approach has several drawbacks. Before designing a microservices-based solution architecture, enterprise solution architects must address the following questions.

  1. Is microservices architecture a good fit for the solution?
  2. How should one define the microservices architecture?

While building microservices architecture for the first version of an application, we suggest going for a “monolithic” approach. This means you build your application in a simple way to validate your idea first. Then, you apply the principles included in this blog to scale and evolve your initial monolith into a microservices-based solution architecture.

There is no value in creating architecturally pure microservices that do not offer value back to the business. Monolithic Architecture patterns will help you to understand several issues and limitations about large and complex systems (that can possibly occur with Microservices architecture).

Monolithic to microservices

Once you have implemented your application using monolithic architecture, you need to consider the following development and operations patterns that you can apply in undertaking a microservices transformation.

1. Decomposition of The Application Into Services

Microservices architecture is a set of loosely coupled services and decomposition of the application into services plays a key role in microservices architecture implementation, deployment, and CI/CD.

Solution architects can define the decomposition methods based on need & solution, there are no “best” methods for decomposition but there are common methods, which can help you to decompose your solution in several services as mentioned below.

To apply decomposition, you need to understand the need & role of each component, weight/links between several components, and more factors for each component of the entire solution.

Decomposition Strategies

  1. Decompose by module/business capability: This method suggests defining each component for each module or feature i.e. messaging, logging, device communication, user management. This helps you to assign an entire feature/module to separate teams, where respective teams will be responsible for a module/feature.
  2. **Decompose by domain: **This method suggests defining the region where your solution is going to be deployed, and further defining the services to that region. Define services corresponding to Domain-Driven Design (DDD) subdomains. DDD refers to the application’s problem space - the business - as the domain. A domain consists of multiple subdomains. Each subdomain corresponds to a different part of the business. E.g. User Management, Device Management, Device Communication.

Things to consider while decomposition:

  • Find boundaries for each service and align them with business capabilities
  • Stay focused on defining the scope of the microservice, and not just shrinking the service. The (right) size of the service should be the required size to facilitate a given business capability
  • The Service should have very few operations/functionalities and a simple message format.
  • Make sure the microservices design ensures the agile/independent development and deployment of the service.
  • Each service must be testable and deployable individually.
  • Services must be cohesive. A service should implement a small set of strongly related functions.
  • Each service should be small enough so that it can be developed by a small team of 6-members
  • The application must be easy to understand and modify
  • The Service must be scalable in load balancer infrastructure like ELB

#microservices #monolithic architecture #legacy applications #microservices implementation #decomposition

Chaz  Homenick

Chaz Homenick

1595462299

Monolithic Decomposition and Implementing Microservices Architecture

“Microservices” is one of the most popular buzz-words in the field of software architecture. While our first article talks about the fundamentals and benefits of microservices, in this article we will explain how enterprises can implement microservices in real-world use cases by leveraging key architectural principles.

How to Start with Designing Microservices-Based Cloud Solution Architecture

Microservices-based solution architecture is not always the best fit for all use-cases, and using a one size fits all approach has several drawbacks. Before designing a microservices-based solution architecture, enterprise solution architects must address the following questions.

  1. Is microservices architecture a good fit for the solution?
  2. How should one define the microservices architecture?

While building microservices architecture for the first version of an application, we suggest going for a “monolithic” approach. This means you build your application in a simple way to validate your idea first. Then, you apply the principles included in this blog to scale and evolve your initial monolith into a microservices-based solution architecture.

There is no value in creating architecturally pure microservices that do not offer value back to the business. Monolithic Architecture patterns will help you to understand several issues and limitations about large and complex systems (that can possibly occur with Microservices architecture).

Monolithic to microservices

Once you have implemented your application using monolithic architecture, you need to consider the following development and operations patterns that you can apply in undertaking a microservices transformation.

1. Decomposition of The Application Into Services

Microservices architecture is a set of loosely coupled services and decomposition of the application into services plays a key role in microservices architecture implementation, deployment, and CI/CD.

Solution architects can define the decomposition methods based on need & solution, there are no “best” methods for decomposition but there are common methods, which can help you to decompose your solution in several services as mentioned below.

To apply decomposition, you need to understand the need & role of each component, weight/links between several components, and more factors for each component of the entire solution.

Decomposition Strategies

  1. Decompose by module/business capability: This method suggests defining each component for each module or feature i.e. messaging, logging, device communication, user management. This helps you to assign an entire feature/module to separate teams, where respective teams will be responsible for a module/feature.
  2. **Decompose by domain: **This method suggests defining the region where your solution is going to be deployed, and further defining the services to that region. Define services corresponding to Domain-Driven Design (DDD) subdomains. DDD refers to the application’s problem space - the business - as the domain. A domain consists of multiple subdomains. Each subdomain corresponds to a different part of the business. E.g. User Management, Device Management, Device Communication.

Things to consider while decomposition:

  • Find boundaries for each service and align them with business capabilities
  • Stay focused on defining the scope of the microservice, and not just shrinking the service. The (right) size of the service should be the required size to facilitate a given business capability
  • The Service should have very few operations/functionalities and a simple message format.
  • Make sure the microservices design ensures the agile/independent development and deployment of the service.
  • Each service must be testable and deployable individually.
  • Services must be cohesive. A service should implement a small set of strongly related functions.
  • Each service should be small enough so that it can be developed by a small team of 6-members
  • The application must be easy to understand and modify
  • The Service must be scalable in load balancer infrastructure like ELB

**2. Microservices Discovery and Registration **

The microservice architecture uses the service registryto maintain the location of service to send requests, and this registry can be managed on the server-side or client-side. The Service can register itself or via a third party (deployment scripts) can register the service. Each service should register itself on the registry on service bootup with a health check interface.

Health check interfaces help the registry check for service availability. While defining the service registry you must implement a mechanism that enables the clients of the service to make requests to a dynamically changing set of ephemeral service instances.

#microservices #monolithic architecture #legacy applications #microservices implementation #decomposition

Chaz  Homenick

Chaz Homenick

1595469600

Monolithic Decomposition and Implementing Microservices Architecture

“Microservices” is one of the most popular buzz-words in the field of software architecture. While our first article talks about the fundamentals and benefits of microservices, in this article we will explain how enterprises can implement microservices in real-world use cases by leveraging key architectural principles.

How to Start with Designing Microservices-Based Cloud Solution Architecture

Microservices-based solution architecture is not always the best fit for all use-cases, and using a one size fits all approach has several drawbacks. Before designing a microservices-based solution architecture, enterprise solution architects must address the following questions.

  1. Is microservices architecture a good fit for the solution?
  2. How should one define the microservices architecture?

While building microservices architecture for the first version of an application, we suggest going for a “monolithic” approach. This means you build your application in a simple way to validate your idea first. Then, you apply the principles included in this blog to scale and evolve your initial monolith into a microservices-based solution architecture.

There is no value in creating architecturally pure microservices that do not offer value back to the business. Monolithic Architecture patterns will help you to understand several issues and limitations about large and complex systems (that can possibly occur with Microservices architecture).

Monolithic to microservices

Once you have implemented your application using monolithic architecture, you need to consider the following development and operations patterns that you can apply in undertaking a microservices transformation.

1. Decomposition of The Application Into Services

Microservices architecture is a set of loosely coupled services and decomposition of the application into services plays a key role in microservices architecture implementation, deployment, and CI/CD.

Solution architects can define the decomposition methods based on need & solution, there are no “best” methods for decomposition but there are common methods, which can help you to decompose your solution in several services as mentioned below.

To apply decomposition, you need to understand the need & role of each component, weight/links between several components, and more factors for each component of the entire solution.

Decomposition Strategies

  1. Decompose by module/business capability: This method suggests defining each component for each module or feature i.e. messaging, logging, device communication, user management. This helps you to assign an entire feature/module to separate teams, where respective teams will be responsible for a module/feature.
  2. **Decompose by domain: **This method suggests defining the region where your solution is going to be deployed, and further defining the services to that region. Define services corresponding to Domain-Driven Design (DDD) subdomains. DDD refers to the application’s problem space - the business - as the domain. A domain consists of multiple subdomains. Each subdomain corresponds to a different part of the business. E.g. User Management, Device Management, Device Communication.

Things to consider while decomposition:

  • Find boundaries for each service and align them with business capabilities
  • Stay focused on defining the scope of the microservice, and not just shrinking the service. The (right) size of the service should be the required size to facilitate a given business capability
  • The Service should have very few operations/functionalities and a simple message format.
  • Make sure the microservices design ensures the agile/independent development and deployment of the service.
  • Each service must be testable and deployable individually.
  • Services must be cohesive. A service should implement a small set of strongly related functions.
  • Each service should be small enough so that it can be developed by a small team of 6-members
  • The application must be easy to understand and modify
  • The Service must be scalable in load balancer infrastructure like ELB

**2. Microservices Discovery and Registration **

The microservice architecture uses the service registryto maintain the location of service to send requests, and this registry can be managed on the server-side or client-side. The Service can register itself or via a third party (deployment scripts) can register the service. Each service should register itself on the registry on service bootup with a health check interface.

Health check interfaces help the registry check for service availability. While defining the service registry you must implement a mechanism that enables the clients of the service to make requests to a dynamically changing set of ephemeral service instances.

#microservices #monolithic architecture #legacy applications #microservices implementation #decomposition

Serverless Vs Microservices Architecture - A Deep Dive

Companies need to be thinking long-term before even starting a software development project. These needs are solved at the level of architecture: business owners want to assure agility, scalability, and performance.

The top contenders for scalable solutions are serverless and microservices. Both architectures prioritize security but approach it in their own ways. Let’s take a look at how businesses can benefit from the adoption of serverless architecture vs microservices, examine their differences, advantages, and use cases.

#serverless #microservices #architecture #software-architecture #serverless-architecture #microservice-architecture #serverless-vs-microservices #hackernoon-top-story

The Service Mesh in the Microservices World - DZone Microservices

The software industry has come a long journey and throughout this journey, Software Architecture has evolved a lot. Starting with 1-tier (Single-node), 2-tier (Client/ Server), 3-tier, and Distributed are some of the Software Architectural patterns we saw in this journey.

The Problem

The majority of software companies are moving from Monolithic architecture to Microservices architecture, and Microservices architecture is taking over the software industry day-by-day. While monolithic architecture has many benefits, it also has so many shortcomings when catering to modern software development needs. With those shortcomings of monolithic architecture, it is very difficult to meet the demand of the modern-world software requirements and as a result, microservices architecture is taking control of the software development aggressively. The Microservices architecture enables us to deploy our applications more frequently, independently, and reliably meeting modern-day software application development requirements.

#microservice architecture #istio #microservice best practices #linkerd #microservice communication #microservice design #envoy proxy #kubernetes architecture #api gateways #service mesh architecture