George  Koelpin

George Koelpin

1602328560

The Ethics of AI and Autonomous Vehicles

In the most diverse society sectors, artificial intelligence ( AI) is assuming a significant role.

We have no return point, and artificial intelligence will be incorporated into our daily life, professionally or socially, into our future.

With the crescent adoption of the technology, some ethical concerns are posed by the notion of “thinking computers” being able to make decisions like humans.

A practical approach to AI adoption must be researched and examined, and this article starts to explore ethical guidelines for the use of intelligent and autonomous systems.

Artificial Intelligence ( AI) has been applied widely among us, with potentially great benefits to humanity, but at the same time, several concerns regarding AI’s unethical use are growing.

In an ideal world, one should configure the AI to avoid unethical tactics, but this could be impractical because it can not be defined beforehand. Research can be used to help regulators, enforcement workers, and others identify problem-sensitive solutions that may be lost in a massive strategy room.

It also indicates that rethinking how AI works in vast strategic spaces could be appropriate to reject unethical outcomes during the learning process explicitly.

#artificial-intelligence #autonomous-vehicles #ai #ai-ethics #ethics

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

The Ethics of AI and Autonomous Vehicles
George  Koelpin

George Koelpin

1602328560

The Ethics of AI and Autonomous Vehicles

In the most diverse society sectors, artificial intelligence ( AI) is assuming a significant role.

We have no return point, and artificial intelligence will be incorporated into our daily life, professionally or socially, into our future.

With the crescent adoption of the technology, some ethical concerns are posed by the notion of “thinking computers” being able to make decisions like humans.

A practical approach to AI adoption must be researched and examined, and this article starts to explore ethical guidelines for the use of intelligent and autonomous systems.

Artificial Intelligence ( AI) has been applied widely among us, with potentially great benefits to humanity, but at the same time, several concerns regarding AI’s unethical use are growing.

In an ideal world, one should configure the AI to avoid unethical tactics, but this could be impractical because it can not be defined beforehand. Research can be used to help regulators, enforcement workers, and others identify problem-sensitive solutions that may be lost in a massive strategy room.

It also indicates that rethinking how AI works in vast strategic spaces could be appropriate to reject unethical outcomes during the learning process explicitly.

#artificial-intelligence #autonomous-vehicles #ai #ai-ethics #ethics

Otho  Hagenes

Otho Hagenes

1619511840

Making Sales More Efficient: Lead Qualification Using AI

If you were to ask any organization today, you would learn that they are all becoming reliant on Artificial Intelligence Solutions and using AI to digitally transform in order to bring their organizations into the new age. AI is no longer a new concept, instead, with the technological advancements that are being made in the realm of AI, it has become a much-needed business facet.

AI has become easier to use and implement than ever before, and every business is applying AI solutions to their processes. Organizations have begun to base their digital transformation strategies around AI and the way in which they conduct their business. One of these business processes that AI has helped transform is lead qualifications.

#ai-solutions-development #artificial-intelligence #future-of-artificial-intellige #ai #ai-applications #ai-trends #future-of-ai #ai-revolution

Why Don’t AI Coders Study AI Ethics?

When AI systems are launched and when they break, especially when they fail in loud and embarrassing ways, experts in AI ethics appear in the press. Computer Science professors share their updated curricula and favorite books critical of relying on algorithms. We hear about the societal affects of AI, brought about by willful ignorance of ‘techies’ or ‘tech bros’. So I thought about, what keeps AI coders so distant from the ethics field?

‘State of the Art’ at all costs

There’s a Hacker News comment which I’ve kept bookmarked since January, which is the peak of AI pushback:

I am worried about the recent trend of “ethical AI”, “interpretable models” etc. IMO it attracts people that can’t come with SOTA [State of the Art] advances in real problems and its their “easier, vague target” to hit and finish their PhDs while getting published in top journals.

Those same people will likely at some point call for a strict regulation of AI using their underwhelming models to keep their advantage,

faking results of their interpretable models, then acting as arbiters and judges of the work of others, preventing future advancements of the field.

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21959105

Let’s not stray too far into Ethicists as True Villains theory. I wanted to explain this thinking that the ethics field doesn’t follow the rules and currency of the AI field. Commercial AI projects have so much hype, that researchers’ conversation revolves around metrics. If someone promotes a new approach but can’t point to a metric to prove a ‘State of the Art’ achievement, their results are not valuable to the author of this post. The ethicist is cast to the familiar role of someone who is using hype, or not technical enough.

#ethical-ai #ai-ethics #explainable-ai #machine-learning

The 12-Step Guide To Design Ethical AI Frameworks

Developing ethical AI has been a severe concern since the advent of this technology. And as the technology matured, designing a moral framework has been the prime motive for many researchers. With more headlines coming up for biased artificial intelligence, replicating human prejudices and discrimination, there are high chances of such issues being a significant problem when applied to critical sectors like — law, healthcare, banking etc.

Policymakers, as well as business leaders, are increasingly aware of opportunities that artificial intelligence can bring along with its risks. Yet, there has been a significant lack in coming to a consensus of creating a process that can ensure the trustworthiness of AI systems. And thus to address these issues, the World Economic Forum has come up with twelve-step guidance for organisations to design and follow AI frameworks.

In a recent blog post, Lofred Madzou, Project Lead of AI & Machine Learning and Kate MacDonald a New Zealand Government Fellow for the World Economic Forum spoke about the criticality of making sure that the behaviour of the AI system is consistent within a framework including legislation and organisational guidelines.

#opinions #ethical ai #ethical ai risk #world economic forum #ai

Ethics, AI, and Responsible ML: Design Principles and Potential Dangers

As we enter the 2020s, it is interesting to look back at how life has changed over the last decade. Compared to your life in 2010, most of you reading this probably use a lot more social media, watch more streaming video, do more shopping online and, in general, are “more digital”. Of course, this is as a result of the continued development in connectivity (4G becoming prominent, with 5G on the horizon), the capability of mobile devices, and lastly, the quiet and transparent adoption of machine learning, a form of artificial intelligence, in the services that you consume.

When you shop online, for example, you are getting AI powered recommendations that make your shopping experience more pleasant and relevant. And over the last decade, many of you will have interacted with a “chatbot”, a form of AI, which hopefully answered a query of yours or helped you in some way. The difference of a decade is basically the chatbot not seeming that amazing anymore…

The term “Artificial Intelligence” was coined in the 1950s, by John McCarthy, a now famous computer scientist. When you think of artificial intelligence, you may think of HAL 9000, or the Terminator, or some other representation of it from popular culture. It wouldn’t be your fault if you did, however, as, ever since the concept came about, it was an easy fit for Sci-Fi movies, especially ones that made AI the bad guy. If John McCarthy and his colleagues simply termed the area of study “automation”, or something equally less imaginative, we probably wouldn’t have this association today.

An AI like HAL 9000, the sentient computer from the movie 2001, would be considered an “Artificial General Intelligence”, one that has a general knowledge across many topics, much like a human, and can bring all of that together to almost “think”. This is opposed to a “Narrow AI” which would have a narrow specialization - an example would be building a regression model to predict the probability of diabetes in a patient, given a few other key health and descriptive indicators. Technically you could consider this automated mathematics and stats, as the algorithms have been known for more than 100 years, but the progress is building now because the data and the computing power are more available

and affordable.

The AI of today is nowhere close to being an “AGI” though. Instead, the AI projects that we see being worked on are most likely “Narrow AI” Machine Learning projects. That means that we’re safe from any Terminator (for now). However, if we don’t consider ethics as part of the AI creation and development process, even for Narrow AI, we could still unleash tremendous harm on society, even sometimes without realising it.

#ai #artificial-intelligence #machine-learning #microsoft #ai-and-ethics #ethics #hackernoon-top-story #azure