Carmen  Grimes

Carmen Grimes

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Coming through with Firefox 82 – Mozilla Hacks

As October ushers in the tail-end of the year, we are pushing Firefox 82 out the door. This time around we finally enable support for the Media Session API, provide some new CSS pseudo-selector behaviours, close some security loopholes involving the Window.name property, and provide inspection for server-sent events in our developer tools.

This blog post provides merely a set of highlights; for all the details, check out the following:

Inspecting server-sent events

Server-sent events allow for an inversion of the traditional client-initiated web request model, with a server sending new data to a web page at any time by pushing messages. In this release we’ve added the ability to inspect server-sent events and their message contents using the Network Monitor.

You can go to the Network Monitor, select the file that is sending the server-sent events, and view the received messages in the Response tab on the right-hand panel.

For more information, check out our Inspecting server-sent events guide.

Web platform updates

Now let’s look at the web platform additions we’ve got in store in 82.

Media Session API

The Media Session API enables two main sets of functionality:

  1. First of all, it provides a way to customize media notifications. It does this by providing metadata for display by the operating system for the media your web app is playing.
  2. Second, it provides event handlers that the browser can use to access platform media keys such as hardware keys found on keyboards, headsets, remote controls, and software keys found in notification areas and on lock screens of mobile devices. So you can seamlessly control web-provided media via your device, even when not looking at the web page.

#developer tools #featured article #firefox #firefox releases #css #firefox #firefox 82 #firefox developer edition #firefox release #web extensions

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Coming through with Firefox 82 – Mozilla Hacks
Carmen  Grimes

Carmen Grimes

1603280160

Coming through with Firefox 82 – Mozilla Hacks

As October ushers in the tail-end of the year, we are pushing Firefox 82 out the door. This time around we finally enable support for the Media Session API, provide some new CSS pseudo-selector behaviours, close some security loopholes involving the Window.name property, and provide inspection for server-sent events in our developer tools.

This blog post provides merely a set of highlights; for all the details, check out the following:

Inspecting server-sent events

Server-sent events allow for an inversion of the traditional client-initiated web request model, with a server sending new data to a web page at any time by pushing messages. In this release we’ve added the ability to inspect server-sent events and their message contents using the Network Monitor.

You can go to the Network Monitor, select the file that is sending the server-sent events, and view the received messages in the Response tab on the right-hand panel.

For more information, check out our Inspecting server-sent events guide.

Web platform updates

Now let’s look at the web platform additions we’ve got in store in 82.

Media Session API

The Media Session API enables two main sets of functionality:

  1. First of all, it provides a way to customize media notifications. It does this by providing metadata for display by the operating system for the media your web app is playing.
  2. Second, it provides event handlers that the browser can use to access platform media keys such as hardware keys found on keyboards, headsets, remote controls, and software keys found in notification areas and on lock screens of mobile devices. So you can seamlessly control web-provided media via your device, even when not looking at the web page.

#developer tools #featured article #firefox #firefox releases #css #firefox #firefox 82 #firefox developer edition #firefox release #web extensions

Firefox 81 Release Kills High-Severity Code-Execution Bugs

Mozilla patched high-severity vulnerabilities with the release of Firefox 81 and Firefox ESR 78.3, including several that could be exploited to run arbitrary code.

Two severe bugs (CVE-2020-15674 and CVE-2020-15673) are errors in the browser’s memory-safety protections, which prevent memory access issues like buffer overflows. CVE-2020-15674 was reported in Firefox 80, while CVE-2020-15673 was reported in Firefox 80 and Firefox ESR 78.2. Firefox ESR (Extended Support Release) is a Firefox version that’s based on an official release for desktop, for use by organizations who need extended support for mass deployments.

“Some of these bugs showed evidence of memory corruption, and we presume that with enough effort some of these could have been exploited to run arbitrary code,” according to a Mozilla Foundation security advisory, released on Tuesday.

#vulnerabilities #web security #buffer error #cve-2020-15673 #cve-2020-15674 #cve-2020-15675 #firefox #firefox 80 #firefox 81 #firefox esr 78.3 #memory safety #mozilla #mozilla foundation #use-after-free #vulnerability #webgl

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How to find WiFi Passwords using Python 2021|Hack WiFi Passwords|Python Script to find WiFi Password

Hack Wifi Passwords easily..

https://youtu.be/7MwTqm_-9Us

 

#wifi #python #passwords #wifipasswords #linux #coding #programming #hacking #hack

#wifi #hack #using #python #python #hacking

Debugging Variables With Watchpoints in Firefox 72

The Firefox Devtools team, along with our community of code contributors, have been working hard to pack Firefox 72 full of improvements. This post introduces the watchpoints feature that’s available right now in Firefox Developer Edition! Keep reading to get up to speed on watchpoints and how to use them.

#debugging #developer tools #featured article #firefox #firefox releases #breakpoints #debugger #debugger for firefox #firefox devtools #firefox visual studio code extension #watchpoints

Creating Firefox browser extensions-19

Welcome to part-19 of the series. You can find part-18 here.

In this part, we will create a new addon called Delete Last Download. This addon shows the last downloaded item, and lets you open or delete it. If the user presses delete, the file is removed from disk and from the browser’s downloads history.

So, go ahead and create a folder DeleteLastDownload and inside it another folder icons. Inside that folder place three icons. You can get them from the github link at the end of this post.

DeleteLastDownload

Now, create a file manifest.json inside the folder DeleteLastDownload and put the below content in it.

It is using the permissions for downloads and downloads.open, which we are going to use soon.

Image for post

#firefox-addons #firefox #javascript-development #mozilla-firefox #javascript-tips #javascript