Hertha  Walsh

Hertha Walsh

1603350000

Deep Speech : Train Native Languages with Transfer Learning

Introduction

Deep Speech is an open-source Speech-To-Text engine. Project Deep Speech uses TensorFlow for the easier implementation.

Deep Speech is composed of two main subsystems:

  1. Acoustic model : a deep neural network that receives audio features as inputs, and outputs character probabilities.
  2. Decoder : uses a beam search algorithm to transform the character probabilities into textual transcripts that are then returned by the system.

Transfer learning is the reuse of a pre-trained model on a new problem. It’s currently very popular in deep learning because it can train deep neural network with comparatively little data. This is very useful in the data science field since most real-world problems typically do not have millions of labeled data points to train such complex models.

Comparatively most native languages are lack of resources to train a neural network from scratch. This approach will be useful to create your own model using a small amount of speech to text corpus.

Benchmarks

English and Mandarin (also some European languages) are the super example for Deep Speech ASR models. This shows that completely different linguistic features can be learned through the same network. It can be easily adapted to different languages. There are some language under progress in development.

Steps

  1. Clone Deep Speech repository from https://github.com/mozilla/DeepSpeech
  2. Prepare Speech and Transcript corpus form https://commonvoice.mozilla.org/en/datasets
  3. Building Language model using KenLM
  4. Get relevant pre-trained English model here https://github.com/mozilla/DeepSpeech/releases

5. Train while freezing layers in pre-trained model

*Note : Language Model is the time consuming part of this approach. Depending on the response, will make it a new article on building language model to train Deep Speech in a custom way.

#language #deep-speech #data-science #nlp #machine-learning

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Deep Speech : Train Native Languages with Transfer Learning
Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1598839687

How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

If you are undertaking a mobile app development for your start-up or enterprise, you are likely wondering whether to use React Native. As a popular development framework, React Native helps you to develop near-native mobile apps. However, you are probably also wondering how close you can get to a native app by using React Native. How native is React Native?

In the article, we discuss the similarities between native mobile development and development using React Native. We also touch upon where they differ and how to bridge the gaps. Read on.

A brief introduction to React Native

Let’s briefly set the context first. We will briefly touch upon what React Native is and how it differs from earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is a popular JavaScript framework that Facebook has created. You can use this open-source framework to code natively rendering Android and iOS mobile apps. You can use it to develop web apps too.

Facebook has developed React Native based on React, its JavaScript library. The first release of React Native came in March 2015. At the time of writing this article, the latest stable release of React Native is 0.62.0, and it was released in March 2020.

Although relatively new, React Native has acquired a high degree of popularity. The “Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019” report identifies it as the 8th most loved framework. Facebook, Walmart, and Bloomberg are some of the top companies that use React Native.

The popularity of React Native comes from its advantages. Some of its advantages are as follows:

  • Performance: It delivers optimal performance.
  • Cross-platform development: You can develop both Android and iOS apps with it. The reuse of code expedites development and reduces costs.
  • UI design: React Native enables you to design simple and responsive UI for your mobile app.
  • 3rd party plugins: This framework supports 3rd party plugins.
  • Developer community: A vibrant community of developers support React Native.

Why React Native is fundamentally different from earlier hybrid frameworks

Are you wondering whether React Native is just another of those hybrid frameworks like Ionic or Cordova? It’s not! React Native is fundamentally different from these earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is very close to native. Consider the following aspects as described on the React Native website:

  • Access to many native platforms features: The primitives of React Native render to native platform UI. This means that your React Native app will use many native platform APIs as native apps would do.
  • Near-native user experience: React Native provides several native components, and these are platform agnostic.
  • The ease of accessing native APIs: React Native uses a declarative UI paradigm. This enables React Native to interact easily with native platform APIs since React Native wraps existing native code.

Due to these factors, React Native offers many more advantages compared to those earlier hybrid frameworks. We now review them.

#android app #frontend #ios app #mobile app development #benefits of react native #is react native good for mobile app development #native vs #pros and cons of react native #react mobile development #react native development #react native experience #react native framework #react native ios vs android #react native pros and cons #react native vs android #react native vs native #react native vs native performance #react vs native #why react native #why use react native

Marget D

Marget D

1618317562

Top Deep Learning Development Services | Hire Deep Learning Developer

View more: https://www.inexture.com/services/deep-learning-development/

We at Inexture, strategically work on every project we are associated with. We propose a robust set of AI, ML, and DL consulting services. Our virtuoso team of data scientists and developers meticulously work on every project and add a personalized touch to it. Because we keep our clientele aware of everything being done associated with their project so there’s a sense of transparency being maintained. Leverage our services for your next AI project for end-to-end optimum services.

#deep learning development #deep learning framework #deep learning expert #deep learning ai #deep learning services

Jerad  Bailey

Jerad Bailey

1598891580

Google Reveals "What is being Transferred” in Transfer Learning

Recently, researchers from Google proposed the solution of a very fundamental question in the machine learning community — What is being transferred in Transfer Learning? They explained various tools and analyses to address the fundamental question.

The ability to transfer the domain knowledge of one machine in which it is trained on to another where the data is usually scarce is one of the desired capabilities for machines. Researchers around the globe have been using transfer learning in various deep learning applications, including object detection, image classification, medical imaging tasks, among others.

#developers corner #learn transfer learning #machine learning #transfer learning #transfer learning methods #transfer learning resources

宇野  和也

宇野 和也

1593877440

Indian Accent Speech Recognition

Traditional ASR (Signal Analysis, MFCC, DTW, HMM & Language Modelling) and DNNs (Custom Models & Baidu DeepSpeech Model) on Indian Accent Speech

Courtesy_: _Speech and Music Technology Lab, IIT Madras

Image Courtesy

Notwithstanding an approved Indian-English accent speech, accent-less enunciation is a myth. Irregardless of the racial stereotypes, our speech is naturally shaped by the vernacular we speak, and the Indian vernaculars are numerous! Then how does a computer decipher speech from different Indian states, which even Indians from other states, find ambiguous to understand?

**ASR (Automatic Speech Recognition) **takes any continuous audio speech and output the equivalent text . In this blog, we will explore some challenges in speech recognition with focus on the speaker-independent recognition, both in theory and practice.

The** challenges in ASR** include

  • Variability of volume
  • Variability of words speed
  • Variability of Speaker
  • Variability of** pitch**
  • Word boundaries: we speak words without pause.
  • **Noises **like background sound, audience talks etc.

Lets address** each of the above problems** in the sections discussed below.

The complete source code of the above studies can be found here.

Models in speech recognition can conceptually be divided into:

  • Acoustic model: Turn sound signals into some kind of phonetic representation.
  • Language model: houses domain knowledge of words, grammar, and sentence structure for the language.

Signal Analysis

When we speak we create sinusoidal vibrations in the air. Higher pitches vibrate faster with a higher frequency than lower pitches. A microphone transduce acoustical energy in vibrations to electrical energy.

If we say “Hello World’ then the corresponding signal would contain 2 blobs

Some of the vibrations in the signal have higher amplitude. The amplitude tells us how much acoustical energy is there in the sound

Our speech is made up of many frequencies at the same time, i.e. it is a sum of all those frequencies. To analyze the signal, we use the component frequencies as features. **Fourier transform **is used to break the signal into these components.

We can use this splitting technique to convert the sound to a Spectrogram, where **frequency **on the vertical axis is plotted against time. The intensity of shading indicates the amplitude of the signal.

Spectrogram of the hello world phrase

To create a Spectrogram,

  1. **Divide the signal **into time frames.
  2. Split each frame signal into frequency components with an FFT.
  3. Each time frame is now represented with a** vector of amplitudes** at each frequency.

one dimensional vector for one time frame

If we line up the vectors again in their time series order, we can have a visual picture of the sound components, the Spectrogram.

Spectrogram can be lined up with the original audio signal in time

Next, we’ll look at Feature Extraction techniques which would reduce the noise and dimensionality of our data.

Unnecessary information is encoded in Spectrograph

Feature Extraction with MFCC

Mel Frequency Cepstrum Coefficient Analysis is the reduction of an audio signal to essential speech component features using both Mel frequency analysis and Cepstral analysis. The range of frequencies are reduced and binned into groups of frequencies that humans can distinguish. The signal is further separated into source and filter so that variations between speakers unrelated to articulation can be filtered away.

a) Mel Frequency Analysis

Only **those frequencies humans can hear are **important for recognizing speech. We can split the frequencies of the Spectrogram into bins relevant to our own ears and filter out sound that we can’t hear.

Frequencies above the black line will be filtered out

b) Cepstral Analysis

We also need to separate the elements of sound that are speaker-independent. We can think of a human voice production model as a combination of source and filter, where the source is unique to an individual and the filter is the articulation of words that we all use when speaking.

Cepstral analysis relies on this model for separating the two. The cepstrum can be extracted from a signal with an algorithm. Thus, we drop the component of speech unique to individual vocal chords and preserving the shape of the sound made by the vocal tract.

Cepstral analysis combined with Mel frequency analysis get you 12 or 13 MFCC features related to speech. **Delta and Delta-Delta MFCC features **can optionally be appended to the feature set, effectively doubling (or tripling) the number of features, up to 39 features, but gives better results in ASR.

Thus MFCC (Mel-frequency cepstral coefficients) Features Extraction,

  • Reduced the dimensionality of our data and
  • We squeeze noise out of the system

So there are 2 Acoustic Features for Speech Recognition:

  • Spectrograms
  • Mel-Frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MFCCs):

When you construct your pipeline, you will be able to choose to use either spectrogram or MFCC features. Next, we’ll look at sound from a language perspective, i.e. the phonetics of the words we hear.

Phonetics

Phonetics is the study of sound in human speech. Linguistic analysis is used to break down human words into their smallest sound segments.


phonemes define the distinct sounds

  • Phoneme is the smallest sound segment that can be used to distinguish one word from another.
  • Grapheme, in contrast, is the smallest distinct unit written in a language. Eg: English has 26 alphabets plus a space (27 graphemes).

Unfortunately, we can’t map phonemes to grapheme, as some letters map to multiple phonemes & some phonemes map to many letters. For example, the C letter sounds different in cat, chat, and circle.

Phonemes are often a useful intermediary between speech and text. If we can successfully produce an acoustic model that decodes a sound signal into phonemes the remaining task would be to map those phonemes to their matching words. This step is called Lexical Decoding, named so as it is based on a lexicon or dictionary of the data set.

If we want to train a limited vocabulary of words we might just skip the phonemes. If we have a large vocabulary, then converting to smaller units first, reduces the total number of comparisons needed.

Acoustic Models and the Trouble with Time

With feature extraction, we’ve addressed noise problems as well as variability of speakers. But we still haven’t solved the problem of matching variable lengths of the same word.

Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) calculates the similarity between two signals, even if their time lengths differ. This can be used to align the sequence data of a new word to its most similar counterpart in a dictionary of word examples.

2 signals mapped with Dynamic Time Warping

#deep-speech #speech #deep-learning #speech-recognition #machine-learning #deep learning

Mikel  Okuneva

Mikel Okuneva

1603735200

Top 10 Deep Learning Sessions To Look Forward To At DVDC 2020

The Deep Learning DevCon 2020, DLDC 2020, has exciting talks and sessions around the latest developments in the field of deep learning, that will not only be interesting for professionals of this field but also for the enthusiasts who are willing to make a career in the field of deep learning. The two-day conference scheduled for 29th and 30th October will host paper presentations, tech talks, workshops that will uncover some interesting developments as well as the latest research and advancement of this area. Further to this, with deep learning gaining massive traction, this conference will highlight some fascinating use cases across the world.

Here are ten interesting talks and sessions of DLDC 2020 that one should definitely attend:

Also Read: Why Deep Learning DevCon Comes At The Right Time


Adversarial Robustness in Deep Learning

By Dipanjan Sarkar

**About: **Adversarial Robustness in Deep Learning is a session presented by Dipanjan Sarkar, a Data Science Lead at Applied Materials, as well as a Google Developer Expert in Machine Learning. In this session, he will focus on the adversarial robustness in the field of deep learning, where he talks about its importance, different types of adversarial attacks, and will showcase some ways to train the neural networks with adversarial realisation. Considering abstract deep learning has brought us tremendous achievements in the fields of computer vision and natural language processing, this talk will be really interesting for people working in this area. With this session, the attendees will have a comprehensive understanding of adversarial perturbations in the field of deep learning and ways to deal with them with common recipes.

Read an interview with Dipanjan Sarkar.

Imbalance Handling with Combination of Deep Variational Autoencoder and NEATER

By Divye Singh

**About: **Imbalance Handling with Combination of Deep Variational Autoencoder and NEATER is a paper presentation by Divye Singh, who has a masters in technology degree in Mathematical Modeling and Simulation and has the interest to research in the field of artificial intelligence, learning-based systems, machine learning, etc. In this paper presentation, he will talk about the common problem of class imbalance in medical diagnosis and anomaly detection, and how the problem can be solved with a deep learning framework. The talk focuses on the paper, where he has proposed a synergistic over-sampling method generating informative synthetic minority class data by filtering the noise from the over-sampled examples. Further, he will also showcase the experimental results on several real-life imbalanced datasets to prove the effectiveness of the proposed method for binary classification problems.

Default Rate Prediction Models for Self-Employment in Korea using Ridge, Random Forest & Deep Neural Network

By Dongsuk Hong

About: This is a paper presentation given by Dongsuk Hong, who is a PhD in Computer Science, and works in the big data centre of Korea Credit Information Services. This talk will introduce the attendees with machine learning and deep learning models for predicting self-employment default rates using credit information. He will talk about the study, where the DNN model is implemented for two purposes — a sub-model for the selection of credit information variables; and works for cascading to the final model that predicts default rates. Hong’s main research area is data analysis of credit information, where she is particularly interested in evaluating the performance of prediction models based on machine learning and deep learning. This talk will be interesting for the deep learning practitioners who are willing to make a career in this field.


#opinions #attend dldc 2020 #deep learning #deep learning sessions #deep learning talks #dldc 2020 #top deep learning sessions at dldc 2020 #top deep learning talks at dldc 2020