A guide to modern Web Development with (Neo)vim

A guide to modern Web Development with (Neo)vim

A guide to modern Web Development with (Neo)vim

Originally published by Caleb Taylor at Medium 

There are a lot of great editors out there that provide a ton of features for web development. Recreating those features in Vim has always been a challenge. I love Vim, but I’ve also dedicated a ton of time to tweaking my setup. This article is a summary of the result of my work.


Jarvis in action

I use coc.nvim and denite to power my coding experience. Denite is used to fuzzy find files, manage open files, and search your project. Coc.nvim drives the intellisense engine by wrapping many of the same core extensions that drive the VSCode IDE. For my full setup, including how I configure these plugins and more, check out my dotfiles.

Note: I’ll just reference Vim in this article, but I actually use Neovim. The plugins all work with Vim as well — depending on the version — but things like the “floating window” feature will be specific to Neovim.

Intro

I write TypeScript/JavaScript on a daily basis, and I know how stark the difference is between Vim and an editor like VSCode out of the box. There are many features available in modern editors that take time, expertise, and/or plugins to achieve in Vim.


I’ve created the following list of features that I expect out of a modern editor. Standard editor features (like syntax highlighting) aren’t included.

  1. Fuzzy File Finding — If you know the file name in the project, you should be able to open it quickly (such as — two keystrokes + minimum number of characters to unique filename).
  2. File Switching — You should be able to see open files, and quickly switch between open files, both with fuzzy finding and manual browsing.
  3. Linting — Code linting should be automatic and fastand you should be able to use a code fixer.
  4. Project Searching — You should be able to search for an arbitrary string, search for a symbol, find definitions, and find usages of a symbol.
  5. Code Intellisense — Having your IDE provide relevant, seamless suggestions and auto-completions can be a huge boost to productivity. In my opinion, the “white whale” for most Vim users.

Getting all of these things working in Vim can be a pain. There are tons of plugins to choose from, configurations to tweak, and docs to read. After 7 years of trial and error, I’ve finally got my setup to a great place. The best part?

I’m going to show you how to get all of the core functionality with just two plugins.

I won’t be covering every feature of these awesome plugins, or listing all the possible alternatives (and there are a lot of great ones). I will focus on highlighting the core functionality I use, as well as any mappings or configurations I use to elevate the experience.

So without further ado, let’s get to it.

Denite

What you get: Fuzzy file finding, file management, project searching


I’m not going to lie, Denite is pretty insane. Just take a look at the docs. At a basic level, it provides a fuzzy-finding layer on top of a bunch of core functionality. It was built by the legendary Shougo, a Jedi master of Vim.

Denite is built on lambdalisue/neovim-prompt. It has a full-featured interface that can take a while to get used to. You can create custom menus, and use many custom sources with Denite as a layer on top.

Basics

I primarily use Denite for finding files in my project, and managing my open files. I have configured Denite to use ripgrep to power my searching. You can see how I’ve configured it in my setup.


I have all of key features mapped for quick and easy access. The keys I use for these mappings are just personal preference, and should be customized per user. I use the “floating window” option for my Denite mappings, but other variations are supported as well (like horizontal/vertical splits).

" === Denite shorcuts === "
	"   ;         - Browser currently open buffers
	"   <leader>t - Browse list of files in current directory
	"   <leader>g - Search current directory for occurences of given term and
	"   close window if no results
	"   <leader>j - Search current directory for occurences of word under cursor
	nmap ; :Denite buffer -split=floating -winrow=1<CR>
	nmap <leader>t :Denite file/rec -split=floating -winrow=1<CR>
	nnoremap <leader>g :<C-u>Denite grep:. -no-empty -mode=normal<CR>
	nnoremap <leader>j :<C-u>DeniteCursorWord grep:. -mode=normal<CR>

Managing Open Files

; brings up a list of currently open files. You can start typing and it will allow you to fuzzy-search through your current open files. With the file list open,<ctrl>o lets you browse the list like you are in normal mode, where you can open and/or delete any files from the list.

Fuzzy Finding Files

<leader>t fuzzy-searches files in the current directory. With ripgrep, any files in your .gitignore are also ignored.

Project Searching

<leader>g and <leader>j search the entire project for a given term, and searching the term under cursor, respectively.

Configuration

Denite can be a pretty tough tool to wrap your head around. It’s well documented, but it does reference some concepts that may be unfamiliar to most users. All of my Denite configurations are documented in my setup, so you should be able to use it as a reference. Here’s a quick sample of configuring the base options of Denite for things like customizing highlight groups and layouts.

" Custom options for Denite
	"   auto_resize             - Auto resize the Denite window height automatically.
	"   prompt                  - Customize denite prompt
	"   direction               - Specify Denite window direction as directly below current pane
	"   winminheight            - Specify min height for Denite window
	"   highlight_mode_insert   - Specify h1-CursorLine in insert mode
	"   prompt_highlight        - Specify color of prompt
	"   highlight_matched_char  - Matched characters highlight
	"   highlight_matched_range - matched range highlight
	let s:denite_options = {'default' : {
	\ 'auto_resize': 1,
	\ 'prompt': 'λ:',
	\ 'direction': 'rightbelow',
	\ 'winminheight': '10',
	\ 'highlight_mode_insert': 'Visual',
	\ 'highlight_mode_normal': 'Visual',
	\ 'prompt_highlight': 'Function',
	\ 'highlight_matched_char': 'Function',
	\ 'highlight_matched_range': 'Normal'
	\ }}

Coc.nvim

What you get: Intellisense code engine, auto-completion, linting, code fixing


One of the biggest challenges with modern development in Vim is setting up intellisense code completion. Most modern editors like Visual Studio Codecome with intellisense engines built in, or easily available with a plugin (with minimal setup).

I have tried a few solutions, and coc.nvim is the best I’ve used. It comes with several major features that are the crux of bringing Vim to the same level as modern IDEs.

There are a few main reasons I think it’s one of the better solutions to intellisense in Vim:

  1. It was incredibly easy to setup, and immediately worked with both my TypeScript and JavaScript projects.
  2. It’s built upon language servers, which power intellisense in many modern editors.
  3. Language server extensions like coc-tsserver are built on top of the TypeScript/JavaScript code extension that is built into VSCode. So as VSCode server extensions improve, Vim users can benefit as well.

Basics

Getting coc.nvim up and running is very straightforward. Once you follow the installation instructions, you can install language server extensions by running :CocInstall .


For example, in my current web-based projects, I can have a fully-functioning intellisense engine for most modern TypeScript/JavaScript projects by running:

:CocInstall coc-tsserver coc-eslint coc-json coc-prettier coc-css

LSP Extension

This is core of coc.nvim experience. With a language server extension like coc-tsserver, you get a ton of features. I’ll highlight a few:


  • Code completion support
  • Go to definition
  • Find references
  • Signature help
  • Code validation
  • Support for Javascript & TypeScript and JSX/TSX

By default, you get fast, automatic code completion. Types are automatically imported, and you can see function signatures and relevant code completions as you type.

I have a few key mappings set up to quickly utilize a few key features of the language server:

" === coc.nvim === "
	nmap <silent> <leader>dd <Plug>(coc-definition)
	nmap <silent> <leader>dr <Plug>(coc-references)
	nmap <silent> <leader>dj <Plug>(coc-implementation)

These mappings allow you to quickly jump to a symbol definition, see the implementation for a symbol, or find where it’s referenced. I use them all frequently and find them to be a huge productivity boost.

Linting

I rely on ESLint for linting both my JavaScript and TypeScript projects. Now that TSLint is being deprecated, the choice is even easier. I initially used Ale(which is a great tool), but it had some issues when used together with coc.nvim.


Now, using the coc-eslint language server extension, you can get real-time feedback from your linter and language server using the same tool. I also use coc-prettier to have coc.nvim format my code to prettier standards on file save.

Configuration

You can configure your coc.nvim setup by creating a configuration file. Right now, mine is pretty simple:

{
	  "suggest.echodocSupport": true,
	  "suggest.maxCompleteItemCount": 20,
	  "coc.preferences.formatOnSaveFiletypes": ["javascript", "typescript", "typescriptreact", "json", "javascriptreact"],
	  "eslint.filetypes": ["javascript", "typescript", "typescriptreact", "javascriptreact"],
	  "diagnostic.errorSign": "•",
	  "diagnostic.warningSign": "•",
	  "diagnostic.infoSign": "•"
	}

You can read more about setting up your own coc.nvim configuration file here.

Conclusion

That about wraps it up. I’d love to hear any feedback or suggestions, so please leave a comment! In case you missed it above, for my full setup, check out my dotfiles and my article on the rest of my setup outside of Vim.

-------------------------------------

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JavaScript Tutorial: if-else Statement in JavaScript

JavaScript Tutorial: if-else Statement in JavaScript

This JavaScript tutorial is a step by step guide on JavaScript If Else Statements. Learn how to use If Else in javascript and also JavaScript If Else Statements. if-else Statement in JavaScript. JavaScript's conditional statements: if; if-else; nested-if; if-else-if. These statements allow you to control the flow of your program's execution based upon conditions known only during run time.

Decision Making in programming is similar to decision making in real life. In programming also we face some situations where we want a certain block of code to be executed when some condition is fulfilled.
A programming language uses control statements to control the flow of execution of the program based on certain conditions. These are used to cause the flow of execution to advance and branch based on changes to the state of a program.

JavaScript’s conditional statements:

  • if
  • if-else
  • nested-if
  • if-else-if

These statements allow you to control the flow of your program’s execution based upon conditions known only during run time.

  • if: if statement is the most simple decision making statement. It is used to decide whether a certain statement or block of statements will be executed or not i.e if a certain condition is true then a block of statement is executed otherwise not.
    Syntax:
if(condition) 
{
   // Statements to execute if
   // condition is true
}

Here, condition after evaluation will be either true or false. if statement accepts boolean values – if the value is true then it will execute the block of statements under it.
If we do not provide the curly braces ‘{‘ and ‘}’ after if( condition ) then by default if statement will consider the immediate one statement to be inside its block. For example,

if(condition)
   statement1;
   statement2;

// Here if the condition is true, if block 
// will consider only statement1 to be inside 
// its block.

Flow chart:

Example:

<script type = "text/javaScript"> 

// JavaScript program to illustrate If statement 

var i = 10; 

if (i > 15) 
document.write("10 is less than 15"); 

// This statement will be executed 
// as if considers one statement by default 
document.write("I am Not in if"); 

< /script> 

Output:

I am Not in if
  • if-else: The if statement alone tells us that if a condition is true it will execute a block of statements and if the condition is false it won’t. But what if we want to do something else if the condition is false. Here comes the else statement. We can use the else statement with if statement to execute a block of code when the condition is false.
    Syntax:
if (condition)
{
    // Executes this block if
    // condition is true
}
else
{
    // Executes this block if
    // condition is false
}


Example:

<script type = "text/javaScript"> 

// JavaScript program to illustrate If-else statement 

var i = 10; 

if (i < 15) 
document.write("10 is less than 15"); 
else
document.write("I am Not in if"); 

< /script> 

Output:

i is smaller than 15
  • nested-if A nested if is an if statement that is the target of another if or else. Nested if statements means an if statement inside an if statement. Yes, JavaScript allows us to nest if statements within if statements. i.e, we can place an if statement inside another if statement.
    Syntax:
if (condition1) 
{
   // Executes when condition1 is true
   if (condition2) 
   {
      // Executes when condition2 is true
   }
}

Example:

<script type = "text/javaScript"> 

// JavaScript program to illustrate nested-if statement 

var i = 10; 

if (i == 10) { 

// First if statement 
if (i < 15) 
	document.write("i is smaller than 15"); 

// Nested - if statement 
// Will only be executed if statement above 
// it is true 
if (i < 12) 
	document.write("i is smaller than 12 too"); 
else
	document.write("i is greater than 15"); 
} 
< /script> 

Output:

i is smaller than 15
i is smaller than 12 too
  • if-else-if ladder Here, a user can decide among multiple options.The if statements are executed from the top down. As soon as one of the conditions controlling the if is true, the statement associated with that if is executed, and the rest of the ladder is bypassed. If none of the conditions is true, then the final else statement will be executed.
if (condition)
    statement;
else if (condition)
    statement;
.
.
else
    statement;


Example:

<script type = "text/javaScript"> 
// JavaScript program to illustrate nested-if statement 

var i = 20; 

if (i == 10) 
document.wrte("i is 10"); 
else if (i == 15) 
document.wrte("i is 15"); 
else if (i == 20) 
document.wrte("i is 20"); 
else
document.wrte("i is not present"); 
< /script> 

Output:

i is 20

How to Retrieve full Profile of LinkedIn User using Javascript

How to Retrieve full Profile of LinkedIn User using Javascript

I am trying to retrieve the full profile (especially job history and educational qualifications) of a linkedin user via the Javascript (Fetch LinkedIn Data Using JavaScript)

Here we are fetching LinkedIn data like Username, Email and other fields using JavaScript SDK.

Here we have 2 workarounds.

  1. Configuration of linkedIn developer api
  2. Javascript Code to fetch records

Configuration of linkedIn developer api

In order to fetch records, first we need to create developer api in linkedin which will act as token/identity while fetching data from other linkedin accounts.

So to create api, navigate to https://linkedin.com/developer/apps and click on 'Create Application'.

After navigating, fill in details like name, description and other required fields and then submit.

As we submit, it will create Client ID and Client Secret shown below, which we will be using in our code while communicating to fetch records from other LinkedIn account.

Note: We need to provide localhost Url here under Oauth 2.0. I am using my localhost, but you can probably use other production URLs under Oauth 2.0 where your app is configured. It will make your api  consider the Url as trusted which fetching records.

Javascript Code to fetch records

For getting user details like first name, last name,User image can be written as,

<script type="text/javascript" src="https://platform.linkedin.com/in.js">  
    api_key: XXXXXXX //Client ID  
    onLoad: OnLinkedInFrameworkLoad //Method that will be called on page load  
    authorize: true  
</script>  
<script type="text/javascript">  
    function OnLinkedInFrameworkLoad() {  
        IN.Event.on(IN, "auth", OnLinkedInAuth);  
    }  
  
    function OnLinkedInAuth() {  
        IN.API.Profile("me").result(ShowProfileData);  
    }  
  
    function ShowProfileData(profiles) {  
        var member = profiles.values[0];  
        var id = member.id;  
        var firstName = member.firstName;  
        var lastName = member.lastName;  
        var photo = member.pictureUrl;  
        var headline = member.headline;  
        //use information captured above  
        var stringToBind = "<p>First Name: " + firstName + " <p/><p> Last Name: " + lastName + "<p/><p>User ID: " + id + " and Head Line Provided: " + headline + "<p/>"  
        document.getElementById('profiles').innerHTML = stringToBind;  
    }  
</script>    

Kindly note we need to include 'https://platform.linkedin.com/in.js' as src under script type as it will act on this Javascript SDK provided by Linkedin.

In the same way we can also fetch records of any organization with the companyid as keyword.

<head>  
    <script type="text/javascript" src="https://platform.linkedin.com/in.js">  
        api_key: XXXXXXX ////Client ID  
        onLoad: onLinkedInLoad  
        authorize: true  
    </script>  
</head>  
  
<body>  
    <div id="displayUpdates"></div>  
    <script type="text/javascript">  
        function onLinkedInLoad() {  
            IN.Event.on(IN, "auth", onLinkedInAuth);  
            console.log("On auth");  
        }  
  
        function onLinkedInAuth() {  
            var cpnyID = XXXXX; //the Company ID for which we want updates  
            IN.API.Raw("/companies/" + cpnyID + "/updates?event-type=status-update&start=0&count=10&format=json").result(displayCompanyUpdates);  
            console.log("After auth");  
        }  
  
        function displayCompanyUpdates(result) {  
            var div = document.getElementById("displayUpdates");  
            var el = "<ul>";  
            var resValues = result.values;  
            for (var i in resValues) {  
                var share = resValues[i].updateContent.companyStatusUpdate.share;  
                var isContent = share.content;  
                var isTitled = isContent,  
                    isLinked = isContent,  
                    isDescription = isContent,  
                    isThumbnail = isContent,  
                    isComment = isContent;  
                if (isTitled) {  
                    var title = isContent.title;  
                } else {  
                    var title = "News headline";  
                }  
                var comment = share.comment;  
                if (isLinked) {  
                    var link = isContent.shortenedUrl;  
                } else {  
                    var link = "#";  
                }  
                if (isDescription) {  
                    var description = isContent.description;  
                } else {  
                    var description = "No description";  
                }  
                /* 
                if (isThumbnailz) { 
                var thumbnailUrl = isContent.thumbnailUrl; 
                } else { 
                var thumbnailUrl = "http://placehold.it/60x60"; 
                } 
                */  
                if (share) {  
                    var content = "<a target='_blank' href=" + link + ">" + comment + "</a><br>";  
                    //el += "<li><img src='" + thumbnailUrl + "' alt=''>" + content + "</li>";  
                    el += "<li><div>" + content + "</div></li>";  
                }  
                console.log(share);  
            }  
            el += "</ul>";  
            document.getElementById("displayUpdates").innerHTML = el;  
        }  
    </script>  
</body>  

We can get multiple metadata while fetching records for any any organization. We can get company updates as shown below.

Conclusion

We can also fetch any company specific data like company job updates/post, total likes, comments, and number of views along with a lot of metadata we can fetch which I have shown below.

Thank you for reading !

7 Best Javascript Iframe Libraries

7 Best Javascript Iframe Libraries

Iframes let you build user experiences into embeddable ‘cross-domain components’, which let users interact with other sites without being redirected. I have compiled 7 best Javascript iframe libraries.

Iframes let you build user experiences into embeddable ‘cross-domain components’, which let users interact with other sites without being redirected. I have compiled 7 best Javascript iframe libraries.

1. Zoid

A cross-domain component toolkit, supporting:

  • Render an iframe or popup on a different domain, and pass down props, including objects and functions
  • Call callbacks natively from the child window without worrying about post-messaging or cross-domain restrictions
  • Create and expose components to share functionality from your site to others!
  • Render your component directly as a React, Vue or Angular component!
    It's 'data-down, actions up' style components, but 100% cross-domain using iframes and popups!

Download


2. Postmate

Postmate is a promise-based API built on postMessage. It allows a parent page to speak with a child iFrame across origins with minimal effort.

Download


3. Iframe Resizer

Keep same and cross domain iFrames sized to their content with support for window/content resizing, in page links, nesting and multiple iFrames

Demo

Download


4. Iframely

Embed proxy. Supports over 1800 domains via custom parsers, oEmbed, Twitter Cards and Open Graph

Demo

Download


5. React Frame component

This component allows you to encapsulate your entire React application or per component in an iFrame.

Demo

Download


6. Seamless.js

A seamless iframe makes it so that visitors are unable to distinguish between content within the iframe and content beside the iframe. Seamless.js is a JavaScript library (with no dependencies) that makes working with iframes easy by doing all the seamless stuff for you automatically.

Demo

Download


7. Porthole

A proxy to safely communicate to cross-domain iframes in javascript

Demo

Download


Thank for read!