Dock  Koelpin

Dock Koelpin

1616146327

How to Choose the Right Database? - MongoDB, Cassandra, MySQL, HBase

Choosing the right database for your application is no easy task. You have a wide variety of options relational databases such as MySQL, or distributed NoSQL solutions such as MongoDB, Cassandra, and HBase. NoSQL has come to mean not only SQL as many distributed database systems do in fact support SQL-style queries, as long as you are not doing complex join operations and this further blurs the lines between these systems. We will talk about how to analyze the requirements of your system in terms of consistency, availability, and partition-tolerance, and how to apply the CAP theorem to guide your choice after showing you where different database technologies fall on the sides of the CAP triangle. We will also talk about more practical considerations, such as your budget, need for professional support, and the ease of integration into the other systems already in place in your organization. Maybe you dont even need a distributed storage solution at all! Choosing the right technology for your data storage will save you a lot of pain as your application grows and evolves and making the wrong choice can lead to all sorts of maintenance problems and wasted work. Your instructor is Frank Kane of Sundog Education, bringing nine years of experience as a senior engineer and senior manager at Amazon.com and IMDb.com, where his job involved extracting meaning from their massive data sets, and processing that data in a highly distributed manner.

Explore the full course on Udemy (special discount included in the link):
https://www.udemy.com/the-ultimate-hands-on-hadoop-tame-your-big-data/?couponCode=HADOOPUYT

#database #mongodb #mysql #sql

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How to Choose the Right Database? - MongoDB, Cassandra, MySQL, HBase
Joe  Hoppe

Joe Hoppe

1595905879

Best MySQL DigitalOcean Performance – ScaleGrid vs. DigitalOcean Managed Databases

HTML to Markdown

MySQL is the all-time number one open source database in the world, and a staple in RDBMS space. DigitalOcean is quickly building its reputation as the developers cloud by providing an affordable, flexible and easy to use cloud platform for developers to work with. MySQL on DigitalOcean is a natural fit, but what’s the best way to deploy your cloud database? In this post, we are going to compare the top two providers, DigitalOcean Managed Databases for MySQL vs. ScaleGrid MySQL hosting on DigitalOcean.

At a glance – TLDR
ScaleGrid Blog - At a glance overview - 1st pointCompare Throughput
ScaleGrid averages almost 40% higher throughput over DigitalOcean for MySQL, with up to 46% higher throughput in write-intensive workloads. Read now

ScaleGrid Blog - At a glance overview - 2nd pointCompare Latency
On average, ScaleGrid achieves almost 30% lower latency over DigitalOcean for the same deployment configurations. Read now

ScaleGrid Blog - At a glance overview - 3rd pointCompare Pricing
ScaleGrid provides 30% more storage on average vs. DigitalOcean for MySQL at the same affordable price. Read now

MySQL DigitalOcean Performance Benchmark
In this benchmark, we compare equivalent plan sizes between ScaleGrid MySQL on DigitalOcean and DigitalOcean Managed Databases for MySQL. We are going to use a common, popular plan size using the below configurations for this performance benchmark:

Comparison Overview
ScaleGridDigitalOceanInstance TypeMedium: 4 vCPUsMedium: 4 vCPUsMySQL Version8.0.208.0.20RAM8GB8GBSSD140GB115GBDeployment TypeStandaloneStandaloneRegionSF03SF03SupportIncludedBusiness-level support included with account sizes over $500/monthMonthly Price$120$120

As you can see above, ScaleGrid and DigitalOcean offer the same plan configurations across this plan size, apart from SSD where ScaleGrid provides over 20% more storage for the same price.

To ensure the most accurate results in our performance tests, we run the benchmark four times for each comparison to find the average performance across throughput and latency over read-intensive workloads, balanced workloads, and write-intensive workloads.

Throughput
In this benchmark, we measure MySQL throughput in terms of queries per second (QPS) to measure our query efficiency. To quickly summarize the results, we display read-intensive, write-intensive and balanced workload averages below for 150 threads for ScaleGrid vs. DigitalOcean MySQL:

ScaleGrid MySQL vs DigitalOcean Managed Databases - Throughput Performance Graph

For the common 150 thread comparison, ScaleGrid averages almost 40% higher throughput over DigitalOcean for MySQL, with up to 46% higher throughput in write-intensive workloads.

#cloud #database #developer #digital ocean #mysql #performance #scalegrid #95th percentile latency #balanced workloads #developers cloud #digitalocean droplet #digitalocean managed databases #digitalocean performance #digitalocean pricing #higher throughput #latency benchmark #lower latency #mysql benchmark setup #mysql client threads #mysql configuration #mysql digitalocean #mysql latency #mysql on digitalocean #mysql throughput #performance benchmark #queries per second #read-intensive #scalegrid mysql #scalegrid vs. digitalocean #throughput benchmark #write-intensive

Dock  Koelpin

Dock Koelpin

1616146327

How to Choose the Right Database? - MongoDB, Cassandra, MySQL, HBase

Choosing the right database for your application is no easy task. You have a wide variety of options relational databases such as MySQL, or distributed NoSQL solutions such as MongoDB, Cassandra, and HBase. NoSQL has come to mean not only SQL as many distributed database systems do in fact support SQL-style queries, as long as you are not doing complex join operations and this further blurs the lines between these systems. We will talk about how to analyze the requirements of your system in terms of consistency, availability, and partition-tolerance, and how to apply the CAP theorem to guide your choice after showing you where different database technologies fall on the sides of the CAP triangle. We will also talk about more practical considerations, such as your budget, need for professional support, and the ease of integration into the other systems already in place in your organization. Maybe you dont even need a distributed storage solution at all! Choosing the right technology for your data storage will save you a lot of pain as your application grows and evolves and making the wrong choice can lead to all sorts of maintenance problems and wasted work. Your instructor is Frank Kane of Sundog Education, bringing nine years of experience as a senior engineer and senior manager at Amazon.com and IMDb.com, where his job involved extracting meaning from their massive data sets, and processing that data in a highly distributed manner.

Explore the full course on Udemy (special discount included in the link):
https://www.udemy.com/the-ultimate-hands-on-hadoop-tame-your-big-data/?couponCode=HADOOPUYT

#database #mongodb #mysql #sql

Install MongoDB Database | MongoDB | Asp.Net Core Mvc

#MongoDB
#Aspdotnetexplorer

https://youtu.be/cnwNWzcw3NM

#mongodb #mongodb database #mongodb with c# #mongodb with asp.net core #mongodb tutorial for beginners #mongodb tutorial

Query of MongoDB | MongoDB Command | MongoDB | Asp.Net Core Mvc

https://youtu.be/FwUobnB5pv8

#mongodb tutorial #mongodb tutorial for beginners #mongodb database #mongodb with c# #mongodb with asp.net core #mongodb

Ruth  Nabimanya

Ruth Nabimanya

1624264740

Creating Cloud Database in MongoDB

How to create a free cloud NoSQL database using MongoDB Atlas

NoSQL databases gained massive popularity in recent years. Rather than storing everything in row and column values, NoSQL databases provide more flexibility. There are quite a few document-oriented NoSQL databases available like AWS SimpleDB, MongoDB, and others. MongoDB provides more flexibility and operations than other NoSQL cloud databases. This would be a series of articles containing information on how to create a MongoDB cluster for cloud databases, how to create collections, and do Create, Read, Update and Delete (CRUD) operations through MongoDB compass (GUI) or through Python (pyMongo). Furthermore, future articles will also contain some advanced operations. If you already know how to create a MongoDB cluster and connect to it through MongoDB compass GUI, you can ignore this article and go to the next one.

First of all, you need to create an account in MongoDB, it’s completely free and does not require credit card information to get MongoDB atlas. You can register through here. MongoDB Atlas provides the cloud database. Once you register, you can select the cluster you want. There are three options available, the one we will use is shared cluster since it’s great for small projects and learning purposes, and it is free. As the name suggests, it will be a shared cluster while other clusters provide more advanced and dedicated services.

#mongodb-atlas #nosql #nosql-database #mongodb #mongodb-compass #creating cloud database in mongodb