Hertha  Mayer

Hertha Mayer

1596682560

6 Common Misconceptions About UX And How to Get Past Them

I know I have and I’m sure I’m not the only one. My problem is, however, that I always come up with what to say after the moment has passed. I get that eureka moment in the elevator after that one discussion with my colleague, or when I have put down my phone. It is too late then.

This got me thinking. I need a way to structure my thoughts if I really want to improve the position and general knowledge of what UX is in the world. So without delaying things further, let’s take a look at some common misconceptions about UX and how you can get past them.


The UI vs UX ketchup bottle

Ah, yes. That picture of the two ketchup bottles. It is supposed to show what the difference between UI and UX is. The left bottle is just UI with a broad base so that the bottle can stand securely. Yet, this is troublesome for users since they have to flip it around when they want to use it. It is a challenge for people with dexterity issues. Not to mention the time it takes for the ketchup to flow down once you flip the bottle.

Image for post

UI vs UX. Image by Tim O’Sullivan.

The UX solution, according to the image, is flipping the bottle design so that the user doesn’t have to flip the bottle anymore. This fixes the dexterity and content flow issues, which is very good of course.

However, this is not UX. The misconception is that a differently shaped bottle is a metaphor for what we call UX.

Actually, both bottles are UI. In this case, the bottle is the bridge between the user and the desired user experience. When we design applications, this bridge is called the user interface, or UI in short. The second bottle is an improved version of the first bottle based on careful user observation, testing, and design thinking.

The resulting user experience of a bottle of ketchup that is more accessible, easy to use, and good looking is achieved by UX design processes. The bottle itself, however, is not UX. It is UI. Just like the first bottle.


Jared Spool’s 2016 tweet on UX portfolio’s

Don’t you just hate it when people misinterpret something someone says? Jared Spool is somewhat of a UX rockstar. His Twitter profile is a gold mine full of valuable UX knowledge. Yet, people seem to focus on one particular tweet from years ago.

“If you’re trying to hire designers & require a portfolio, you’re not gonna get top talent. The best designers don’t have them. Too busy. ”— Jared Spool

A famous person from the field of design says the top design talent doesn’t have a portfolio. Now I don’t have to spend time and effort to create a portfolio myself!

This of course isn’t how it works. A tweet from a well-known UX professional isn’t an excuse to be lazy and not work on your portfolio.

You don’t need a portfolio only when your actions speak for you. If you’re famous, built and sold a well-known startup, or have a great design-related product, you don’t need a portfolio. You don’t ask Bill Gates or Jony Ive for a portfolio. Everybody knows who they are and what they do.

For everybody else, yes, you will need a portfolio. Design is a very portfolio-driven field of work. It is a great way of showing who you are and what you are capable of.

Someone with a portfolio isn’t always a great designer and someone without a portfolio isn’t always a bad designer. The one just doesn’t exclude the other.

Instead of focusing on Jared’s 2016 tweet, why don’t you focus on his series of tweets that provide valuable tips and tricks on creating great portfolios? It is the road less traveled, but at least it will get you somewhere.

#ux #visual-design #creativity #productivity #design

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6 Common Misconceptions About UX And How to Get Past Them

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Hertha  Mayer

Hertha Mayer

1596682560

6 Common Misconceptions About UX And How to Get Past Them

I know I have and I’m sure I’m not the only one. My problem is, however, that I always come up with what to say after the moment has passed. I get that eureka moment in the elevator after that one discussion with my colleague, or when I have put down my phone. It is too late then.

This got me thinking. I need a way to structure my thoughts if I really want to improve the position and general knowledge of what UX is in the world. So without delaying things further, let’s take a look at some common misconceptions about UX and how you can get past them.


The UI vs UX ketchup bottle

Ah, yes. That picture of the two ketchup bottles. It is supposed to show what the difference between UI and UX is. The left bottle is just UI with a broad base so that the bottle can stand securely. Yet, this is troublesome for users since they have to flip it around when they want to use it. It is a challenge for people with dexterity issues. Not to mention the time it takes for the ketchup to flow down once you flip the bottle.

Image for post

UI vs UX. Image by Tim O’Sullivan.

The UX solution, according to the image, is flipping the bottle design so that the user doesn’t have to flip the bottle anymore. This fixes the dexterity and content flow issues, which is very good of course.

However, this is not UX. The misconception is that a differently shaped bottle is a metaphor for what we call UX.

Actually, both bottles are UI. In this case, the bottle is the bridge between the user and the desired user experience. When we design applications, this bridge is called the user interface, or UI in short. The second bottle is an improved version of the first bottle based on careful user observation, testing, and design thinking.

The resulting user experience of a bottle of ketchup that is more accessible, easy to use, and good looking is achieved by UX design processes. The bottle itself, however, is not UX. It is UI. Just like the first bottle.


Jared Spool’s 2016 tweet on UX portfolio’s

Don’t you just hate it when people misinterpret something someone says? Jared Spool is somewhat of a UX rockstar. His Twitter profile is a gold mine full of valuable UX knowledge. Yet, people seem to focus on one particular tweet from years ago.

“If you’re trying to hire designers & require a portfolio, you’re not gonna get top talent. The best designers don’t have them. Too busy. ”— Jared Spool

A famous person from the field of design says the top design talent doesn’t have a portfolio. Now I don’t have to spend time and effort to create a portfolio myself!

This of course isn’t how it works. A tweet from a well-known UX professional isn’t an excuse to be lazy and not work on your portfolio.

You don’t need a portfolio only when your actions speak for you. If you’re famous, built and sold a well-known startup, or have a great design-related product, you don’t need a portfolio. You don’t ask Bill Gates or Jony Ive for a portfolio. Everybody knows who they are and what they do.

For everybody else, yes, you will need a portfolio. Design is a very portfolio-driven field of work. It is a great way of showing who you are and what you are capable of.

Someone with a portfolio isn’t always a great designer and someone without a portfolio isn’t always a bad designer. The one just doesn’t exclude the other.

Instead of focusing on Jared’s 2016 tweet, why don’t you focus on his series of tweets that provide valuable tips and tricks on creating great portfolios? It is the road less traveled, but at least it will get you somewhere.

#ux #visual-design #creativity #productivity #design

Shawn  Durgan

Shawn Durgan

1596671273

Does UX makes organizations smarter?

Forrester Research’s report, “Rich Internet Application Errors to Avoid,” shows that 70% of projects fail due to lack of user acceptance.

These research reports tell us that organizations do not prioritize the UX (User Experience) process before initiating new digital projects and do not understand how it can benefit them.

It’s all about “Does the shoe fit in that user’s foot?”.

UX should be put in the business context. A lot of teams see UX as a product-level thing, but in fact, UX should go up from product all the way to the executive level. Another thing that is critical is letting UX teams have autonomy so they can influence. Usually, software development companies or independent software vendors have an engineering culture. These companies tend to subordinate UX because they’re more familiar with engineering and they expect UX to act and think and behave like engineers. UX team should be spending time with users collecting users’ pain points and feedback to keep executive, marketing and dev teams informed.

What Is The ROI (Return of Investment) of UX?

There are many case studies with ROI. The three key elements that lead UX path to success are:

  • Defining Personas can get you four times return on investment. It’s hard to do empathy when you don’t have an outside-in perspective. It’s important to conduct user research to understand the users’ characteristics, behaviours, needs and context of use.
  • Rapid Prototyping is 50% more accuratefor build time and costs estimations; 80% of development teams requests for clarification are reduced; and the amount of rework and bug fixes post launch can be reduced to 25%. Wireframing is a good mitigation — the best results come from testing no more than 5 users and running a rapid prototype as a test solution. Using this understanding is essential to avoid building the wrong product.
  • And finally, Usability testing makes teams smarter by improving design decision making with the results. Evaluating the design with users by conducting usability testing and making changes based on the findings in an iterative design process. MacAfee redesigned its ProtectionPilot software in 2004 to improve its usability. Tech support calls were decreased by 90% after launch. With 20,000 downloads over a 10 week period, there were only 170 support calls.

Rapid prototyping

Prototyping — Source: Unsplash

UX Helps Achieve Business Goals

Good user experiences don’t happen by chance. They are purposely designed through a user experience design process that aims to create a solution that meets both business and user needs. How?

  • Understanding business and user needs to design a solution that follows human factors principles and design best practices. **Scenario-driven design **is an approach to understand customer contexts, tasks, their needs and desires and put that in a scenario and then model it.
  • Identifying barriers using analyticsAB testing and user testing is really important to user success and to boost ROI.
  • Determining the business impact of potential changes through cost-benefits analysis like SWOT analysis and business model Canvas.
  • Creating measurable business goals and targeting specific aspects of design.
  • Collecting detailed user goals and explicitly document scenarios like Personas and Journey Maps.

User Journey Map is also known as Customer Journey Map is a a visualization of the process

#ux-maturity #ux-management #ux #business-value #ux-design

Shawn  Durgan

Shawn Durgan

1599054400

Tone of Voice and UX Design

When thinking about the UX design of your project, there are so many elements to keep in mind that the actual written content is often left on the back burner. We’re told “Users don’t read!” so we Lorem ipsum our way out until we absolutely _have _to write something. However, we must keep in mind — whenever users do read, they pay attention. And that is why establishing your tone of voice is a critical part of the UX design process.

But what is this so-called “tone” exactly? According to this excerpt from the Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics,

Traditionally, tone has denoted an intangible quality, frequently an affective one, which is metaphorically predicate of a literary work or of some part of it such as its style. It is said to pervade and “color” the whole, like a mood in a human being, and in various ways to contribute to the aesthetic excellence of the work…. In Practical Criticism, I. A. Richards compared tone to social manners and defined it as the reflection in a discourse of the author’s attitude towards his audience.

Sounds complicated? Essentially, the tone of voice indicates how the speaker _feels _towards the reader. While the term was originally coined to talk about literature, nowadays it applies heavily to UX design. It’s seen in everything from buttons to calls to action, and even in error pages. How your product speaks to your users is integral to their experience and has a noticeable impact: the right tone could be the difference between a one-time visitor and a convert.

And this is not an exaggeration — in a study by Nielsen Norman Group, users were shown two versions of four product websites (insurance company, bank, hospital, home security system), and asked to give their opinions. Even though the two different versions of each website were identical except for the tone of voice, respondents had very clear preferences. For example, the casual version of the hospital website was unanimously preferred over its formal counterpart. It was perceived to be more friendly and even more trustworthy, despite the fact that we would usually associate confidence and trustworthiness with the formality of the second version. However, that version was seen as “businesslike” and not very reassuring for a prospective hospital patient. The tone of voice was ill-suited to the product in the minds of the users, so that version of the website did not have the desired impact.

Image for post

The inspirations behind the casual and formal hospital website versions — notice the introductory paragraphs and their supporting images. Source

#ux-writing #ux-research #design #ux-design #ux

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