Cyril  Parisian

Cyril Parisian

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Calling C/C++ libraries from Xamarin code

The Xamarin platform allows developing iOS and Android applications entirely in C#. Sometimes, however, some legacy code may be too large or complex to make porting it to C## for your mobile app worthwhile. Most examples found online show you how to use existing Objective-C libraries in Xamarin.iOS and existing Java libraries in Xamarin.Android. However, it is entirely possible to call C code from a Xamarin app. Microsoft’s recent support for C/C++ on iOS and Android in Visual Studio can make this a simple task.

You will need the sources for the code you want to call to compile it for iOS and Android. The code cannot access any libraries which you only have binaries for that have been compiled for other platforms.

To get started, create a new C++ cross-platform project using Visual Studio 2015.

You will need to have the corresponding Visual Studio package installed to have this option available.

This will create three projects: one for Android, one for iOS, and a shared project.

It is important to understand the shared project concept for this. The code in the shared project does not result in a DLL or library being generated. A shared project can hold any type of file. Projects referencing the shared project can access code from any file in the shared project. The code will then be compiled in the context of the referencing project. If code is not referenced, it is not compiled. For this reason, it is necessary to have calls into all code needed contained in the platform-specific projects. This means that the platform-specific C/C++ projects need to contain code, too. This code can be identical in the Android and iOS projects and reside in the same files. Unlike in .NET projects, file linking is not needed for C++ projects; source code files do not have to reside inside a project’s folder or subfolder.

#programming #native #visual studio #xamarin #xamarin.ios #cplusplus

Calling C/C++ libraries from Xamarin code