Lawrence  Lesch

Lawrence Lesch

1660195680

Remark: A Simple, in-browser, Markdown-driven Slideshow tool

remark   

A simple, in-browser, markdown-driven slideshow tool targeted at people who know their way around HTML and CSS, featuring:

  • Markdown formatting, with smart extensions
  • Presenter mode with markdown formatted speaker notes and cloned slideshow view
  • Syntax highlighting, supporting a range of languages
  • Slide scaling, thus similar appearance on all devices / resolutions
  • Simple markdown templates for customized slides
  • Touch support for smart phones and pads, i.e. swipe to navigate slides

Check out this remark slideshow for a brief introduction.

To render your Markdown-based slideshow on the fly, checkout Remarkise.

Getting Started

It takes only a few, simple steps to get up and running with remark:

  1. Create an HTML file to contain your slideshow (see boilerplate below)
  2. Open the HTML file in a decent browser
  3. Edit the Markdown and/or CSS styles as needed, save and refresh!
  4. Press C to clone a display; then press P to switch to presenter mode. Open help menu with h.

See any of the boilerplate-*.html files (the -local one requires building remark first), or just copy the boilerplate HTML below to start:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <head>
    <title>Title</title>
    <meta charset="utf-8">
    <style>
      @import url(https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Yanone+Kaffeesatz);
      @import url(https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Droid+Serif:400,700,400italic);
      @import url(https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Ubuntu+Mono:400,700,400italic);

      body { font-family: 'Droid Serif'; }
      h1, h2, h3 {
        font-family: 'Yanone Kaffeesatz';
        font-weight: normal;
      }
      .remark-code, .remark-inline-code { font-family: 'Ubuntu Mono'; }
    </style>
  </head>
  <body>
    <textarea id="source">

class: center, middle

# Title

---

# Agenda

1. Introduction
2. Deep-dive
3. ...

---

# Introduction

    </textarea>
    <script src="https://remarkjs.com/downloads/remark-latest.min.js">
    </script>
    <script>
      var slideshow = remark.create();
    </script>
  </body>
</html>

How To Use remark

The wiki pages contain all the how-to, templating, and API help.

Real-world remark slideshows

On using remark:

Other interesting stuff:

Printing

Converting to PDF is primarily supported via Chrome's Print to PDF feature. Note that the styling is not exact; See #50 for some recommended CSS to add to your styles.

Alternatively, you can use DeckTape, a PDF exporter for HTML presentation frameworks that provides support for remark.

Contributors

Thanks goes to these people for their contributions:

  • Aaron Meurer
  • Adam Obeng
  • Adam Strzelecki
  • Aleksandar Trifunovic
  • Alexander Brett
  • Alex Claman
  • Alex Y. Wagner
  • Allan Jiang
  • Amin Bandali
  • Andrea Georgieva
  • Andrew Gaul
  • Andrey Ustyuzhanin
  • Antonin Stefanutti
  • Axel Rauschmayer
  • Baron Schwartz
  • Bastian Venthur
  • Bengt Lüers
  • Benjamin Stigsen
  • Bernát Kalló
  • bobappleyard
  • Brandon Keepers
  • Breno Polanski
  • Bruno Fagundez
  • bugdone
  • Cameron Daigle
  • Chris Kanich
  • Christian Dreier
  • Christopher McClellan
  • Christoph Gnip
  • cjwit
  • Claudio Bley
  • Daan van Berkel
  • Daniel Stankiewicz
  • Daniel Wang
  • Danny Tuppeny
  • Dan Steingart
  • datamike
  • Dave Henderson
  • David Richards
  • derickfay
  • Dirk Husemann
  • Erwann Mest
  • Fabian
  • Felix C. Stegerman
  • Florian Rathgeber
  • follower
  • Gerard Capes
  • gnab
  • Grégoire Pineau
  • Gurjeet Singh
  • Hadrien Frank Cardinal de Cuzey
  • Hiroshi Fukada
  • Hubert Chen
  • Hunter-Github
  • hydroid7
  • Ivo Wever
  • J_4lexander
  • Jason
  • Jason Underhill
  • Jérôme Petazzoni
  • Jimmy Merrild Krag
  • Joe Beda
  • Joel Porquet
  • Johannes Wienke
  • Julien Wajsberg
  • kellyoconor
  • kerim
  • kernc
  • Kim Joar Bekkelund
  • Lauro Caetano
  • Loreia
  • Marcel Schilling
  • Markus Schanz
  • Martin
  • Martin 'Hasan' Bramwell
  • Mathias Bynens
  • Matthew
  • Mears-UFL
  • mhor
  • Michael Byrne
  • Michael Grosser
  • Michael Mol
  • Michael Sanford
  • Mike Pennisi
  • Morton Fox
  • mrbald
  • Nicolas Hart
  • Oleksiy Syvokon
  • Ole Petter Bang
  • Ozan K
  • Pavel Boldyrev
  • Pedro
  • Pedro Martin
  • Peter Jausovec
  • petitviolet
  • Pi-Hsun Shih
  • pille1842
  • piranha
  • pospi
  • Psychos-Yi
  • punkish
  • Radovan Bast
  • Rahul Bansal
  • Rasmus Vestergaard Hansen
  • rasmusvhansen
  • Renato Alves
  • rglepe
  • Rich Trott
  • Roberto Soares
  • Robert Perce
  • Robert Szmurło
  • Robin Berjon
  • Rolf
  • Rostyk
  • Russell Keith-Magee
  • Ryan Thomson
  • Sarah Binney
  • Scott Hewitt
  • Sebastian Pipping
  • Sequoia McDowell
  • Shane Curcuru
  • Shaun Hammill
  • siba prasad samal
  • Simon Hengel
  • Stian Mathiassen
  • stu-b-doo
  • Sylvain Abélard
  • Takashi Kanemoto
  • Tej Chajed
  • Thomas Ballinger
  • Tobias Løfgren
  • Todd Brannam
  • Todd Gureckis
  • Tome Tanasovski
  • Tom Kraak
  • Torgeir Thoresen
  • tripu
  • vdepabk2t
  • William Ghelfi
  • Willi Rath
  • Wouter Sioen
  • Yihui Xie
  • Yinhe Zhang
  • Yohan Lasorsa
  • Yoshiya Hinosawa

Download Details:

Author: Gnab
Source Code: https://github.com/gnab/remark 
License: MIT license

#javascript #html #markdown 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Remark: A Simple, in-browser, Markdown-driven Slideshow tool
Lawrence  Lesch

Lawrence Lesch

1660195680

Remark: A Simple, in-browser, Markdown-driven Slideshow tool

remark   

A simple, in-browser, markdown-driven slideshow tool targeted at people who know their way around HTML and CSS, featuring:

  • Markdown formatting, with smart extensions
  • Presenter mode with markdown formatted speaker notes and cloned slideshow view
  • Syntax highlighting, supporting a range of languages
  • Slide scaling, thus similar appearance on all devices / resolutions
  • Simple markdown templates for customized slides
  • Touch support for smart phones and pads, i.e. swipe to navigate slides

Check out this remark slideshow for a brief introduction.

To render your Markdown-based slideshow on the fly, checkout Remarkise.

Getting Started

It takes only a few, simple steps to get up and running with remark:

  1. Create an HTML file to contain your slideshow (see boilerplate below)
  2. Open the HTML file in a decent browser
  3. Edit the Markdown and/or CSS styles as needed, save and refresh!
  4. Press C to clone a display; then press P to switch to presenter mode. Open help menu with h.

See any of the boilerplate-*.html files (the -local one requires building remark first), or just copy the boilerplate HTML below to start:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <head>
    <title>Title</title>
    <meta charset="utf-8">
    <style>
      @import url(https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Yanone+Kaffeesatz);
      @import url(https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Droid+Serif:400,700,400italic);
      @import url(https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Ubuntu+Mono:400,700,400italic);

      body { font-family: 'Droid Serif'; }
      h1, h2, h3 {
        font-family: 'Yanone Kaffeesatz';
        font-weight: normal;
      }
      .remark-code, .remark-inline-code { font-family: 'Ubuntu Mono'; }
    </style>
  </head>
  <body>
    <textarea id="source">

class: center, middle

# Title

---

# Agenda

1. Introduction
2. Deep-dive
3. ...

---

# Introduction

    </textarea>
    <script src="https://remarkjs.com/downloads/remark-latest.min.js">
    </script>
    <script>
      var slideshow = remark.create();
    </script>
  </body>
</html>

How To Use remark

The wiki pages contain all the how-to, templating, and API help.

Real-world remark slideshows

On using remark:

Other interesting stuff:

Printing

Converting to PDF is primarily supported via Chrome's Print to PDF feature. Note that the styling is not exact; See #50 for some recommended CSS to add to your styles.

Alternatively, you can use DeckTape, a PDF exporter for HTML presentation frameworks that provides support for remark.

Contributors

Thanks goes to these people for their contributions:

  • Aaron Meurer
  • Adam Obeng
  • Adam Strzelecki
  • Aleksandar Trifunovic
  • Alexander Brett
  • Alex Claman
  • Alex Y. Wagner
  • Allan Jiang
  • Amin Bandali
  • Andrea Georgieva
  • Andrew Gaul
  • Andrey Ustyuzhanin
  • Antonin Stefanutti
  • Axel Rauschmayer
  • Baron Schwartz
  • Bastian Venthur
  • Bengt Lüers
  • Benjamin Stigsen
  • Bernát Kalló
  • bobappleyard
  • Brandon Keepers
  • Breno Polanski
  • Bruno Fagundez
  • bugdone
  • Cameron Daigle
  • Chris Kanich
  • Christian Dreier
  • Christopher McClellan
  • Christoph Gnip
  • cjwit
  • Claudio Bley
  • Daan van Berkel
  • Daniel Stankiewicz
  • Daniel Wang
  • Danny Tuppeny
  • Dan Steingart
  • datamike
  • Dave Henderson
  • David Richards
  • derickfay
  • Dirk Husemann
  • Erwann Mest
  • Fabian
  • Felix C. Stegerman
  • Florian Rathgeber
  • follower
  • Gerard Capes
  • gnab
  • Grégoire Pineau
  • Gurjeet Singh
  • Hadrien Frank Cardinal de Cuzey
  • Hiroshi Fukada
  • Hubert Chen
  • Hunter-Github
  • hydroid7
  • Ivo Wever
  • J_4lexander
  • Jason
  • Jason Underhill
  • Jérôme Petazzoni
  • Jimmy Merrild Krag
  • Joe Beda
  • Joel Porquet
  • Johannes Wienke
  • Julien Wajsberg
  • kellyoconor
  • kerim
  • kernc
  • Kim Joar Bekkelund
  • Lauro Caetano
  • Loreia
  • Marcel Schilling
  • Markus Schanz
  • Martin
  • Martin 'Hasan' Bramwell
  • Mathias Bynens
  • Matthew
  • Mears-UFL
  • mhor
  • Michael Byrne
  • Michael Grosser
  • Michael Mol
  • Michael Sanford
  • Mike Pennisi
  • Morton Fox
  • mrbald
  • Nicolas Hart
  • Oleksiy Syvokon
  • Ole Petter Bang
  • Ozan K
  • Pavel Boldyrev
  • Pedro
  • Pedro Martin
  • Peter Jausovec
  • petitviolet
  • Pi-Hsun Shih
  • pille1842
  • piranha
  • pospi
  • Psychos-Yi
  • punkish
  • Radovan Bast
  • Rahul Bansal
  • Rasmus Vestergaard Hansen
  • rasmusvhansen
  • Renato Alves
  • rglepe
  • Rich Trott
  • Roberto Soares
  • Robert Perce
  • Robert Szmurło
  • Robin Berjon
  • Rolf
  • Rostyk
  • Russell Keith-Magee
  • Ryan Thomson
  • Sarah Binney
  • Scott Hewitt
  • Sebastian Pipping
  • Sequoia McDowell
  • Shane Curcuru
  • Shaun Hammill
  • siba prasad samal
  • Simon Hengel
  • Stian Mathiassen
  • stu-b-doo
  • Sylvain Abélard
  • Takashi Kanemoto
  • Tej Chajed
  • Thomas Ballinger
  • Tobias Løfgren
  • Todd Brannam
  • Todd Gureckis
  • Tome Tanasovski
  • Tom Kraak
  • Torgeir Thoresen
  • tripu
  • vdepabk2t
  • William Ghelfi
  • Willi Rath
  • Wouter Sioen
  • Yihui Xie
  • Yinhe Zhang
  • Yohan Lasorsa
  • Yoshiya Hinosawa

Download Details:

Author: Gnab
Source Code: https://github.com/gnab/remark 
License: MIT license

#javascript #html #markdown 

50+ Useful DevOps Tools

The article comprises both very well established tools for those who are new to the DevOps methodology.

What Is DevOps?

The DevOps methodology, a software and team management approach defined by the portmanteau of Development and Operations, was first coined in 2009 and has since become a buzzword concept in the IT field.

DevOps has come to mean many things to each individual who uses the term as DevOps is not a singularly defined standard, software, or process but more of a culture. Gartner defines DevOps as:

“DevOps represents a change in IT culture, focusing on rapid IT service delivery through the adoption of agile, lean practices in the context of a system-oriented approach. DevOps emphasizes people (and culture), and seeks to improve collaboration between operations and development teams. DevOps implementations utilize technology — especially automation tools that can leverage an increasingly programmable and dynamic infrastructure from a life cycle perspective.”

As you can see from the above definition, DevOps is a multi-faceted approach to the Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC), but its main underlying strength is how it leverages technology and software to streamline this process. So with the right approach to DevOps, notably adopting its philosophies of co-operation and implementing the right tools, your business can increase deployment frequency by a factor of 30 and lead times by a factor of 8000 over traditional methods, according to a CapGemini survey.

The Right Tools for the Job

This list is designed to be as comprehensive as possible. The article comprises both very well established tools for those who are new to the DevOps methodology and those tools that are more recent releases to the market — either way, there is bound to be a tool on here that can be an asset for you and your business. For those who already live and breathe DevOps, we hope you find something that will assist you in your growing enterprise.

With such a litany of tools to choose from, there is no “right” answer to what tools you should adopt. No single tool will cover all your needs and will be deployed across a variety of development and Operational teams, so let’s break down what you need to consider before choosing what tool might work for you.

  • Plan and collaborate: Before you even begin the SDLC, your business needs to have a cohesive idea of what tools they’ll need to implement across your teams. There are even DevOps tools that can assist you with this first crucial step.
  • Build: Here you want tools that create identically provisioned environments. The last you need is to hear “But it works for me on my computer”
  • Automation: This has quickly become a given in DevOps, but automation will always drastically increase production over manual methods.
  • Continuous Integration: Tools need to provide constant and immediate feedback, several times a day but not all integrations are implemented equally, will the tool you select be right for the job?
  • Deployment: Deployments need to be kept predictable, smooth, and reliable with minimal risks, automation will also play a big part in this process.

With all that in mind, I hope this selection of tools will aid you as your business continues to expand into the DevOps lifestyle.

Tools Categories List:

Infrastructure As Code

Continuous Integration and Delivery

Development Automation

Usability Testing

Database and Big Data

Monitoring

Testing

Security

Helpful CLI Tools

Development

Visualization

Infrastructure As Code

#AWSCloudFormation

1. AWS CloudFormation

AWS CloudFormation is an absolute must if you are currently working, or planning to work, in the AWS Cloud. CloudFormation allows you to model your AWS infrastructure and provision all your AWS resources swiftly and easily. All of this is done within a JSON or YAML template file and the service comes with a variety of automation features ensuring your deployments will be predictable, reliable, and manageable.

Link: https://aws.amazon.com/cloudformation/

2. Azure Resource Manager

Azure Resource Manager (ARM) is Microsoft’s answer to an all-encompassing IAC tool. With its ARM templates, described within JSON files, Azure Resource Manager will provision your infrastructure, handle dependencies, and declare multiple resources via a single template.

Link: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/features/resource-manager/

#Google Cloud Deployment Manager

3. Google Cloud Deployment Manager

Much like the tools mentioned above, Google Cloud Deployment Manager is Google’s IAC tool for the Google Cloud Platform. This tool utilizes YAML for its config files and JINJA2 or PYTHON for its templates. Some of its notable features are synchronistic deployment and ‘preview’, allowing you an overhead view of changes before they are committed.

Link: https://cloud.google.com/deployment-manager/

4. Terraform

Terraform is brought to you by HashiCorp, the makers of Vault and Nomad. Terraform is vastly different from the above-mentioned tools in that it is not restricted to a specific cloud environment, this comes with increased benefits for tackling complex distributed applications without being tied to a single platform. And much like Google Cloud Deployment Manager, Terraform also has a preview feature.

Link: https://www.terraform.io/

#Chef

5. Chef

Chef is an ideal choice for those who favor CI/CD. At its heart, Chef utilizes self-described recipes, templates, and cookbooks; a collection of ready-made templates. Cookbooks allow for consistent configuration even as your infrastructure rapidly scales. All of this is wrapped up in a beautiful Ruby-based DSL pie.

Link: https://www.chef.io/products/chef-infra/

#Ansible

#tools #devops #devops 2020 #tech tools #tool selection #tool comparison

Zakary  Goyette

Zakary Goyette

1599651600

These are the Top 5 Browsers for Privacy and Security

Anonymity on the internet has been in a steady state of decline. In the interest of reversing that trend, this is a list of the top five browsers for privacy and security. While it should be noted that nothing published on the internet is perfectly private or secure, these are the browsers that will do the most to get you close.

The issue

Modern digital marketing agencies, eCommerce sites, and ISPs use cookies to show ads or monetize your browsing data without permission. If there’s a buck to be made, someone will make it.

But anonymous browsing can act as some sort of cover. Not complete cover, however, but more than it’s more than nothing. To enhance your privacy and security while browsing the web, consider these five browsers.

Tor Browser :

Tor is fully open-sourced and great for anonymous web browsing. It protects against snooping on web browsing activity. Nowadays a lot of ads agencies use this technique to serve you what they believe to be perfectly tantalizing ad content.

Tor is a cross-platform web browser, which means it supports platforms like Windows, macOS, Linu and more. It can also be used as via a USB device and configured to a user’s specifications. While many say it’s a browser designed for hackers, it can also be used by those who simply value their privacy.

Tor hides your IP, which means your physical location is unavailable to those looking for where you’re searching what. It also helps users get around restrictions used by governments looking to block what can be accessed within their borders.

Pros:

  • An open-source browser
  • Committed to privacy
  • Comes with .onion browser extension for extra security
  • Shields IP addresses from websites
  • Uses strong server relays

Cons:

  • Slower than regular browsers
  • Doesn’t block malware
  • Tells websites Tor is in use

#security #privacy #browsers #privacy-browsers #browsers-for-security #tor #secure-browsers

Sunny  Kunde

Sunny Kunde

1597848060

Top 12 Most Used Tools By Developers In 2020

rameworks and libraries can be said as the fundamental building blocks when developers build software or applications. These tools help in opting out the repetitive tasks as well as reduce the amount of code that the developers need to write for a particular software.

Recently, the Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2020 surveyed nearly 65,000 developers, where they voted their go-to tools and libraries. Here, we list down the top 12 frameworks and libraries from the survey that are most used by developers around the globe in 2020.

(The libraries are listed according to their number of Stars in GitHub)

1| TensorFlow

**GitHub Stars: **147k

Rank: 5

**About: **Originally developed by researchers of Google Brain team, TensorFlow is an end-to-end open-source platform for machine learning. It has a comprehensive, flexible ecosystem of tools, libraries, and community resources that lets researchers push the state-of-the-art research in ML. It allows developers to easily build and deploy ML-powered applications.

Know more here.

2| Flutter

**GitHub Stars: **98.3k

**Rank: **9

About: Created by Google, Flutter is a free and open-source software development kit (SDK) which enables fast user experiences for mobile, web and desktop from a single codebase. The SDK works with existing code and is used by developers and organisations around the world.


#opinions #developer tools #frameworks #java tools #libraries #most used tools by developers #python tools

Ethen Ellen

1619858914

AOL Emails Not Loading Problems (+1-888-857-5157) in Chrome Browser

This is image title
AOL Mail is one of the free email services that includes calendar management and task management. If your AOL Emails Not Loading Problems in Chrome Browser, try these troubleshooting steps which is mention below. In this post, we are trying to describe the reason behind AOL email not loading and how to resolve AOL mail loading issues.

3 Reason Behind AOL Emails Not Loading Problems

Reason #1. Whenever you are unable to receive the new emails into your computer. You should log into your AOL mail account and go to the settings and click on filter settings. Now check the account settings, if you find any filter. you need to click on delete. After deleting the settings, you should send a mail to yourself. Let’s see if you are receiving it now or not.

Reason #2. If you do not find any filters into your emails, you should check the block list settings, maybe you have blocked the new emails from senders. That’s why you are not receiving any new emails. so, you should immediately go ahead and check it.

Reason #3. If you are unable to receive the new emails into your phone or computer. I would like to suggest you to check the server settings. Most of the time, people are facing such kind of problem due to the incorrect server settings. So, you should check them properly and if you find something wrong over there. You need to remove the account from your computer or phone and then reconfigure it. It will start working fine.

How to Resolve AOL Emails Not Loading Problems in Chrome Browser

If Your AOL Emails Not Loading Problems in Chrome Browser then you can go and find a help to resolve this issue. To get through this problem, follow the instructions below:

Solution 1: Clear browsing data on Chrome

  • On your computer, launch the Google Chrome browser after assuring that you have a stable Internet connection.
  • Close all the browser tabs (if any) and open a new blank tab.
  • Click the Customize and control Google Chrome icon at the top-right corner and select the More tools option from the drop-down list.
  • In the pop-up window, navigate to the top-left corner and click the clear browsing data tab beneath History.
  • When you are asked to choose the time limit, choose the Time
  • After choosing all the data, click the Clear data button to remove all your Chrome browsing data.
  • Once you have removed all the browsing data, sign in to your AOL Mail.
  • If your AOL Mail is still not loading on Chrome, move on to the next solution.

Solution 2: Reset web settings

  • On your Chrome browser, stop all the running tabs and start a blank tab.
  • Navigate to the top-right corner of the tab and click the Customize and control Google Chrome icon (three vertical dots).
  • Click on Settings from the drop-down list.
  • Navigate to the bottom of the Settings page and click Advanced.
  • Click the Reset Settings tab twice underneath Reset and clean up.
  • Now, your Chrome browser will be restored to factory defaults.
  • Restart your Chrome browser and navigate to the official AOL site.
  • Enter the correct login credentials in the essential field and try signing in to your AOL email account.
    If AOL Mail is still not loading on Chrome, contact our technical support team by clicking the Call button available on this page for remote assistance.
    After this, if you are unable to resolve AOL emails loading problems in chrome browser, don’t be panic. Email Expert 24*7 team is here to resolve all AOL mail issues as soon as possible. Just Dial Customer Care Toll-Free Number: +1-888-857-5157 and get instant help. Our technical team’s services are available- 24x7.

Source: https://email-expert247.blogspot.com/2021/01/aol-emails-not-loading-problems-1-888.html

#aol mail not loading problems in chrome browser #aol email not loading problems in chrome browser #aol not loading problems in chrome browser #aol mail not loading issues in chrome browser #aol email not loading issues in chrome browser