19 Simple JavaScript Coding Standards to Keep Your Code Clean

Coding standards can help with the below:
Keeps the code consistent
Easier to read and understand
Easier to maintainer
The coding standards below are my own opinion on what can help with the above points.
When comparing use === instead of ==
This is important due to JavaScript being a dynamic language so using == might give you unexpected results due to it allowing the type to be different.

#technology #software-development #programming #coding #javascript

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

19 Simple JavaScript Coding Standards to Keep Your Code Clean

19 Simple JavaScript Coding Standards to Keep Your Code Clean

Coding standards can help with the below:
Keeps the code consistent
Easier to read and understand
Easier to maintainer
The coding standards below are my own opinion on what can help with the above points.
When comparing use === instead of ==
This is important due to JavaScript being a dynamic language so using == might give you unexpected results due to it allowing the type to be different.

#technology #software-development #programming #coding #javascript

Giles  Goodwin

Giles Goodwin

1603857900

4 Ways You Can Get Rid of Dirty Side Effects for Cleaner Code in JavaScript

According to an analysis, a developer creates 70 bugs per 1000 lines of code on average. As a result, he spends 75% of his time on debugging. So sad!

Bugs are born in many ways. Creating side effects is one of them.

Some people say side effects are evil, some say they’re not.

I’m in the first group. Side effects should be considered evil. And we should aim for side effects free code.

Here are 4ways you can use to achieve the goal.

1. use strict;

Just add use strict; to the beginning of your files. This special string will turn your code validation on and prevent you from using variables without declaring them first.

#functional-programming #javascript-tips #clean-code #coding #javascript-development #javascript

Rahul Jangid

1622207074

What is JavaScript - Stackfindover - Blog

Who invented JavaScript, how it works, as we have given information about Programming language in our previous article ( What is PHP ), but today we will talk about what is JavaScript, why JavaScript is used The Answers to all such questions and much other information about JavaScript, you are going to get here today. Hope this information will work for you.

Who invented JavaScript?

JavaScript language was invented by Brendan Eich in 1995. JavaScript is inspired by Java Programming Language. The first name of JavaScript was Mocha which was named by Marc Andreessen, Marc Andreessen is the founder of Netscape and in the same year Mocha was renamed LiveScript, and later in December 1995, it was renamed JavaScript which is still in trend.

What is JavaScript?

JavaScript is a client-side scripting language used with HTML (Hypertext Markup Language). JavaScript is an Interpreted / Oriented language called JS in programming language JavaScript code can be run on any normal web browser. To run the code of JavaScript, we have to enable JavaScript of Web Browser. But some web browsers already have JavaScript enabled.

Today almost all websites are using it as web technology, mind is that there is maximum scope in JavaScript in the coming time, so if you want to become a programmer, then you can be very beneficial to learn JavaScript.

JavaScript Hello World Program

In JavaScript, ‘document.write‘ is used to represent a string on a browser.

<script type="text/javascript">
	document.write("Hello World!");
</script>

How to comment JavaScript code?

  • For single line comment in JavaScript we have to use // (double slashes)
  • For multiple line comments we have to use / * – – * /
<script type="text/javascript">

//single line comment

/* document.write("Hello"); */

</script>

Advantages and Disadvantages of JavaScript

#javascript #javascript code #javascript hello world #what is javascript #who invented javascript

Brain  Crist

Brain Crist

1594741500

Clean Code — 4 Rules of Simple Design

1
What if there were simple rules that could help you create a good design as you worked and help you gain insight into the structure and design of your code?
2

3
Kent Beck came up with four rules of Simple Design while he was developing ExtremeProgramming in the late 1990s. Until now, many developers feel that these rules are of significant help in creating simple yet well-designed software, and also helps in maintaining code to be clean. According to Kent, a design is “simple” when it follows these rules, in order of the importance:
4

5
Image for post
6

7
https://www.martinfowler.com/bliki/BeckDesignRules.html
8

9

  • Passes the tests (It Works)
    10
  • Reveals intention
    11
  • No duplication
    12
  • Fewest elements
    13

    14
    The rules are in priority order, so “passes the tests” takes priority over “reveals intention”.
    15

    16
    Without further delay, let’s dig in each of every rule and talks about what they mean in the full extent:
    17

    18

1st Rule: Passes All Tests (It Works!)

19

20
Image for post
21

22
https://blogs.egu.eu/divisions/gd/files/2019/07/Untitled-4-e1560239780934-1400x800.png
23

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First of all, of course, we need to make a working application to be delivered, that’s why it’s the number one priority. One of the many things that could make us sure that our app is working fine (and know exactly why it’s working) is to have tests for the particular code we wrote. Writing tests (comprehensive tests) actually could lead us to better designs. The more tests we write, the more we’ll continue to push towards things that are simpler to test, thus pushing us towards making our classes small and single purpose.
25

26


27

28

_Once the tests are passed, we are empowered to keep our code clean. We do this by refactoring the code, and it’s better to do it frequently and incrementally after each few lines of code we add. After making a single feature work and pass all the tests, take time to review your code. Did others not understand what I actually write here? Am I just degrading it? If the answers are yes, then we clean it up and run our tests. _The fact that we have these tests eliminates the fear that cleaning up the code will break it!
29

30
The next 3 rules could help you to check the quality of your code.
31

32


33

34

2nd Rule: Reveals Intention

35

36
Image for post
37

38
https://cdn.wrytin.com/images/wrytup/r/1024/under-jx0fxee8.jpeg
39

40
When we are communicating with other people, we need to make sure other parties understand what we want to convey in our conversation. It’s also the same with code. As coders, we were working as a team in a project and there are lots of other coders that will see, touch, or even need to modify the existing code, and it’s very important for them to understand what you write in there.
41

42
To make our code reveals our intentions, we need to be expressive, and the most important way to be expressive is to try. Too often we get our code working and then move on to the next problem without giving a second thought to make that code easy to read. Place ourselves as other people that will become the next person to read our code. Care is a precious resource.
43

44
Some things that we can do to make our code more expressive are:
45

46

  • Choose a good name that represents the things. Use predictable names so when other people read the class, function, or variable names, they don’t get a wrong idea or surprised when discovering the responsibilities.
    47
  • **_Keep your functions and classes small. _**It’s easier to name, write, and understand it.
    48
  • Challenge and commit yourself to write code so that it reads as documentation. Well-written unit tests are expressive and act as documentation by example. Someone that reads the tests should be able to get a quick understanding of what a class is all about.
    What if there were simple rules that could help you create a good design as you worked and help you gain insight into the structure and design of your code?

Kent Beck came up with four rules of Simple Design while he was developing ExtremeProgramming in the late 1990s. Until now, many developers feel that these rules are of significant help in creating simple yet well-designed software, and also helps in maintaining code to be clean. According to Kent, a design is “simple” when it follows these rules, in order of the importance:

Image for post

https://www.martinfowler.com/bliki/BeckDesignRules.html

Passes the tests (It Works)
Reveals intention
No duplication
Fewest elements
The rules are in priority order, so “passes the tests” takes priority over “reveals intention”.

Without further delay, let’s dig in each of every rule and talks about what they mean in the full extent:

1st Rule: Passes All Tests (It Works!)
Image for post

https://blogs.egu.eu/divisions/gd/files/2019/07/Untitled-4-e1560239780934-1400x800.png

First of all, of course, we need to make a working application to be delivered, that’s why it’s the number one priority. One of the many things that could make us sure that our app is working fine (and know exactly why it’s working) is to have tests for the particular code we wrote. Writing tests (comprehensive tests) actually could lead us to better designs. The more tests we write, the more we’ll continue to push towards things that are simpler to test, thus pushing us towards making our classes small and single purpose.

_Once the tests are passed, we are empowered to keep our code clean. We do this by refactoring the code, and it’s better to do it frequently and incrementally after each few lines of code we add. After making a single feature work and pass all the tests, take time to review your code. Did others not understand what I actually write here? Am I just degrading it? If the answers are yes, then we clean it up and run our tests. _The fact that we have these tests eliminates the fear that cleaning up the code will break it!

The next 3 rules could help you to check the quality of your code.

2nd Rule: Reveals Intention
Image for post

https://cdn.wrytin.com/images/wrytup/r/1024/under-jx0fxee8.jpeg

When we are communicating with other people, we need to make sure other parties understand what we want to convey in our conversation. It’s also the same with code. As coders, we were working as a team in a project and there are lots of other coders that will see, touch, or even need to modify the existing code, and it’s very important for them to understand what you write in there.

To make our code reveals our intentions, we need to be expressive, and the most important way to be expressive is to try. Too often we get our code working and then move on to the next problem without giving a second thought to make that code easy to read. Place ourselves as other people that will become the next person to read our code. Care is a precious resource.

Some things that we can do to make our code more expressive are:

Choose a good name that represents the things. Use predictable names so when other people read the class, function, or variable names, they don’t get a wrong idea or surprised when discovering the responsibilities.
**_Keep your functions and classes small. _**It’s easier to name, write, and understand it.
Challenge and commit yourself to write code so that it reads as documentation. Well-written unit tests are expressive and act as documentation by example. Someone that reads the tests should be able to get a quick understanding of what a class is all about.

#clean-code #simple-design #visual studio code #coding

Joseph  Murray

Joseph Murray

1624096560

Java Coding Standards

The guidelines provided by Java are intended to improve the readability of code and make it consistent across the wide spectrum of Java projects. A style guide is about consistency. Consistency with this style guide is important. Consistency within a project is more important. Consistency within one package, class, or method is the most important.

The main goal of the recommendation is to improve readability and thereby the understanding and the maintainability and general quality of the code. It is impossible to cover all the specific cases in a general guide and the programmer should be flexible.

Now let’s talk about the naming convention in Java:-

1. Package name:-

2. Class and Interface name:-

3. Method name:-

4. Variable name:-

#coding-style #coding-standards #java #java coding standards #conventions #code conventions