Scottie  Mills

Scottie Mills

1626904920

How to Use FastCGI Cache with Nginx

Learn how to configure PHP caching with FastCGI cache an Nginx web server.

Find more at https://tonyteaches.tech/fastcgi-cache-with-nginx/

Check out my vlog channel @Tony Florida

#nginx #fastcgi

Music: Milos by Eveningland https://youtu.be/xVzOFBggR3o

#nginx

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

How to Use FastCGI Cache with Nginx

Why Use WordPress? What Can You Do With WordPress?

Can you use WordPress for anything other than blogging? To your surprise, yes. WordPress is more than just a blogging tool, and it has helped thousands of websites and web applications to thrive. The use of WordPress powers around 40% of online projects, and today in our blog, we would visit some amazing uses of WordPress other than blogging.
What Is The Use Of WordPress?

WordPress is the most popular website platform in the world. It is the first choice of businesses that want to set a feature-rich and dynamic Content Management System. So, if you ask what WordPress is used for, the answer is – everything. It is a super-flexible, feature-rich and secure platform that offers everything to build unique websites and applications. Let’s start knowing them:

1. Multiple Websites Under A Single Installation
WordPress Multisite allows you to develop multiple sites from a single WordPress installation. You can download WordPress and start building websites you want to launch under a single server. Literally speaking, you can handle hundreds of sites from one single dashboard, which now needs applause.
It is a highly efficient platform that allows you to easily run several websites under the same login credentials. One of the best things about WordPress is the themes it has to offer. You can simply download them and plugin for various sites and save space on sites without losing their speed.

2. WordPress Social Network
WordPress can be used for high-end projects such as Social Media Network. If you don’t have the money and patience to hire a coder and invest months in building a feature-rich social media site, go for WordPress. It is one of the most amazing uses of WordPress. Its stunning CMS is unbeatable. And you can build sites as good as Facebook or Reddit etc. It can just make the process a lot easier.
To set up a social media network, you would have to download a WordPress Plugin called BuddyPress. It would allow you to connect a community page with ease and would provide all the necessary features of a community or social media. It has direct messaging, activity stream, user groups, extended profiles, and so much more. You just have to download and configure it.
If BuddyPress doesn’t meet all your needs, don’t give up on your dreams. You can try out WP Symposium or PeepSo. There are also several themes you can use to build a social network.

3. Create A Forum For Your Brand’s Community
Communities are very important for your business. They help you stay in constant connection with your users and consumers. And allow you to turn them into a loyal customer base. Meanwhile, there are many good technologies that can be used for building a community page – the good old WordPress is still the best.
It is the best community development technology. If you want to build your online community, you need to consider all the amazing features you get with WordPress. Plugins such as BB Press is an open-source, template-driven PHP/ MySQL forum software. It is very simple and doesn’t hamper the experience of the website.
Other tools such as wpFoRo and Asgaros Forum are equally good for creating a community blog. They are lightweight tools that are easy to manage and integrate with your WordPress site easily. However, there is only one tiny problem; you need to have some technical knowledge to build a WordPress Community blog page.

4. Shortcodes
Since we gave you a problem in the previous section, we would also give you a perfect solution for it. You might not know to code, but you have shortcodes. Shortcodes help you execute functions without having to code. It is an easy way to build an amazing website, add new features, customize plugins easily. They are short lines of code, and rather than memorizing multiple lines; you can have zero technical knowledge and start building a feature-rich website or application.
There are also plugins like Shortcoder, Shortcodes Ultimate, and the Basics available on WordPress that can be used, and you would not even have to remember the shortcodes.

5. Build Online Stores
If you still think about why to use WordPress, use it to build an online store. You can start selling your goods online and start selling. It is an affordable technology that helps you build a feature-rich eCommerce store with WordPress.
WooCommerce is an extension of WordPress and is one of the most used eCommerce solutions. WooCommerce holds a 28% share of the global market and is one of the best ways to set up an online store. It allows you to build user-friendly and professional online stores and has thousands of free and paid extensions. Moreover as an open-source platform, and you don’t have to pay for the license.
Apart from WooCommerce, there are Easy Digital Downloads, iThemes Exchange, Shopify eCommerce plugin, and so much more available.

6. Security Features
WordPress takes security very seriously. It offers tons of external solutions that help you in safeguarding your WordPress site. While there is no way to ensure 100% security, it provides regular updates with security patches and provides several plugins to help with backups, two-factor authorization, and more.
By choosing hosting providers like WP Engine, you can improve the security of the website. It helps in threat detection, manage patching and updates, and internal security audits for the customers, and so much more.

Read More

#use of wordpress #use wordpress for business website #use wordpress for website #what is use of wordpress #why use wordpress #why use wordpress to build a website

Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1603600800

NGINX Announces Eight Solutions that Let Developers Run Safely with Scissors

Technology is hard. As technologists, I think we like it that way. It’s built‑in job security, right? Well, unfortunately, the modern application world has become unproductively hard. We need to make it easier.

That’s why I like describing the current developer paradox as the need to run safely with scissors.

NGINX Balances Developer Choice with Infrastructure Guardrails

Running with scissors is a simple metaphor for what is the admittedly difficult ask we make of software engineers. Developers need to run. Time to market and feature velocity are critical to the success of digital businesses. As a result, we don’t want to encumber developers with processes or technology choices that slow them down. Instead we empower them to pick tools and stacks that let them deliver code to customers as quickly as possible.

But there’s a catch. In the world of fast releases, multiple daily (or hourly or minutely!) changes, and fail‑fast development, we risk introducing application downtime into digital experiences – that risk is the metaphorical scissors that make it dangerous to run fast. On some level we know it’s wrong to make developers run with scissors. But the speed upside trumps the downtime downside.

That frames the dilemma of our era: we need our developers to run with scissors, but we don’t want anybody to get hurt. Is there a solution?

At NGINX, the answer is “yes”. I’m excited to announce eight new or significantly enhanced solutions built to unleash developer speed without sacrificing the governance, visibility, and control infrastructure teams require.

Load Balancing and Security DNS Solutions Empower Self‑Service

As my colleague, Gus Robertson, eloquently points out in his recent blog The Essence of Sprint Is Speed, self‑service is an important part of developer empowerment. He talks about developers as the engines of digital transformation. And if they’re not presented with easy-to-use, capable tools, they take matters into their own hands. The result is shadow IT and significant infrastructure risk.

Self‑service turns this on its head. It provides infrastructure teams with a way to release the application delivery and security technologies that developers need for A/B, canary, blue‑green, and circuit‑breaker patterns. But it does so within the guardrails that ensure the consistency, reliability, and security that ensure your apps remain running once in production.

#blog #news #opinion #red hat #nginx controller #nginx app protect #nginx sprint 2020 #nginx ingress controller #nginx service mesh #f5 dns cloud services #nginx analytics cloud service

Josefa  Corwin

Josefa Corwin

1659736920

Mailboxer: A Rails Gem to Send Messages inside A Web Application

Mailboxer

This project is based on the need for a private message system for ging / social_stream. Instead of creating our core message system heavily dependent on our development, we are trying to implement a generic and potent messaging gem.

After looking for a good gem to use we noticed the lack of messaging gems and functionality in them. Mailboxer tries to fill this void delivering a powerful and flexible message system. It supports the use of conversations with two or more participants, sending notifications to recipients (intended to be used as system notifications “Your picture has new comments”, “John Doe has updated his document”, etc.), and emailing the messageable model (if configured to do so). It has a complete implementation of a Mailbox object for each messageable with inbox, sentbox and trash.

The gem is constantly growing and improving its functionality. As it is used with our parallel development ging / social_stream we are finding and fixing bugs continously. If you want some functionality not supported yet or marked as TODO, you can create an issue to ask for it. It will be great feedback for us, and we will know what you may find useful in the gem.

Mailboxer was born from the great, but outdated, code from lpsergi / acts_as_messageable.

We are now working to make exhaustive documentation and some wiki pages in order to make it even easier to use the gem to its full potential. Please, give us some time if you find something missing or ask for it. You can also find us on the Gitter room for this repo. Join us there to talk.

Installation

Add to your Gemfile:

gem 'mailboxer'

Then run:

$ bundle install

Run install script:

$ rails g mailboxer:install

And don't forget to migrate your database:

$ rake db:migrate

You can also generate email views:

$ rails g mailboxer:views

Upgrading

If upgrading from 0.11.0 to 0.12.0, run the following generators:

$ rails generate mailboxer:namespacing_compatibility
$ rails generate mailboxer:install -s

Then, migrate your database:

$ rake db:migrate

Requirements & Settings

Emails

We are now adding support for sending emails when a Notification or a Message is sent to one or more recipients. You should modify the mailboxer initializer (/config/initializer/mailboxer.rb) to edit these settings:

Mailboxer.setup do |config|
  #Enables or disables email sending for Notifications and Messages
  config.uses_emails = true
  #Configures the default `from` address for the email sent for Messages and Notifications of Mailboxer
  config.default_from = "no-reply@dit.upm.es"
  ...
end

You can change the way in which emails are delivered by specifying a custom implementation of notification and message mailers:

Mailboxer.setup do |config|
  config.notification_mailer = CustomNotificationMailer
  config.message_mailer = CustomMessageMailer
  ...
end

If you have subclassed the Mailboxer::Notification class, you can specify the mailers using a member method:

class NewDocumentNotification < Mailboxer::Notification
  def mailer_class
    NewDocumentNotificationMailer
  end
end

class NewCommentNotification < Mailboxer::Notification
  def mailer_class
    NewDocumentNotificationMailer
  end
end

Otherwise, the mailer class will be determined by appending 'Mailer' to the mailable class name.

User identities

Users must have an identity defined by a name and an email. We must ensure that Messageable models have some specific methods. These methods are:

#Returning any kind of identification you want for the model
def name
  return "You should add method :name in your Messageable model"
end
#Returning the email address of the model if an email should be sent for this object (Message or Notification).
#If no mail has to be sent, return nil.
def mailboxer_email(object)
  #Check if an email should be sent for that object
  #if true
  return "define_email@on_your.model"
  #if false
  #return nil
end

These names are explicit enough to avoid colliding with other methods, but as long as you need to change them you can do it by using mailboxer initializer (/config/initializer/mailboxer.rb). Just add or uncomment the following lines:

Mailboxer.setup do |config|
  # ...
  #Configures the methods needed by mailboxer
  config.email_method = :mailboxer_email
  config.name_method = :name
  config.notify_method = :notify
  # ...
end

You may change whatever you want or need. For example:

config.email_method = :notification_email
config.name_method = :display_name
config.notify_method = :notify_mailboxer

Will use the method notification_email(object) instead of mailboxer_email(object), display_name for name and notify_mailboxer for notify.

Using default or custom method names, if your model doesn't implement them, Mailboxer will use dummy methods so as to notify you of missing methods rather than crashing.

Preparing your models

In your model:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  acts_as_messageable
end

You are not limited to the User model. You can use Mailboxer in any other model and use it in several different models. If you have ducks and cylons in your application and you want to exchange messages as if they were the same, just add acts_as_messageable to each one and you will be able to send duck-duck, duck-cylon, cylon-duck and cylon-cylon messages. Of course, you can extend it for as many classes as you need.

Example:

class Duck < ActiveRecord::Base
  acts_as_messageable
end
class Cylon < ActiveRecord::Base
  acts_as_messageable
end

Mailboxer API

Warning for version 0.8.0

Version 0.8.0 sees Messageable#read and Messageable#unread renamed to mark_as_(un)read, and Receipt#read and Receipt#unread to is_(un)read. This may break existing applications, but read is a reserved name for Active Record, and the best pratice in this case is simply avoid using it.

How can I send a message?

#alfa wants to send a message to beta
alfa.send_message(beta, "Body", "subject")

How can I read the messages of a conversation?

As a messageable, what you receive are receipts, which are associated with the message itself. You should retrieve your receipts for the conversation and get the message associated with them.

This is done this way because receipts save the information about the relation between messageable and the messages: is it read?, is it trashed?, etc.

#alfa gets the last conversation (chronologically, the first in the inbox)
conversation = alfa.mailbox.inbox.first

#alfa gets it receipts chronologically ordered.
receipts = conversation.receipts_for alfa

#using the receipts (i.e. in the view)
receipts.each do |receipt|
  ...
  message = receipt.message
  read = receipt.is_unread? #or message.is_unread?(alfa)
  ...
end

How can I reply to a message?

#alfa wants to reply to all in a conversation
#using a receipt
alfa.reply_to_all(receipt, "Reply body")

#using a conversation
alfa.reply_to_conversation(conversation, "Reply body")
#alfa wants to reply to the sender of a message (and ONLY the sender)
#using a receipt
alfa.reply_to_sender(receipt, "Reply body")

How can I delete a message from trash?

#delete conversations forever for one receipt (still in database)
receipt.mark_as_deleted

#you can mark conversation as deleted for one participant
conversation.mark_as_deleted participant

#Mark the object as deleted for messageable
#Object can be:
  #* A Receipt
  #* A Conversation
  #* A Notification
  #* A Message
  #* An array with any of them
alfa.mark_as_deleted conversation

# get available message for specific user
conversation.messages_for(alfa)

How can I retrieve my conversations?

#alfa wants to retrieve all his conversations
alfa.mailbox.conversations

#A wants to retrieve his inbox
alfa.mailbox.inbox

#A wants to retrieve his sent conversations
alfa.mailbox.sentbox

#alfa wants to retrieve his trashed conversations
alfa.mailbox.trash

How can I paginate conversations?

You can use Kaminari to paginate the conversations as normal. Please, make sure you use the last version as mailboxer uses select('DISTINCT conversations.*') which was not respected before Kaminari 0.12.4 according to its changelog. Working correctly on Kaminari 0.13.0.

#Paginating all conversations using :page parameter and 9 per page
conversations = alfa.mailbox.conversations.page(params[:page]).per(9)

#Paginating received conversations using :page parameter and 9 per page
conversations = alfa.mailbox.inbox.page(params[:page]).per(9)

#Paginating sent conversations using :page parameter and 9 per page
conversations = alfa.mailbox.sentbox.page(params[:page]).per(9)

#Paginating trashed conversations using :page parameter and 9 per page
conversations = alfa.mailbox.trash.page(params[:page]).per(9)

You can take a look at the full documentation for Mailboxer in rubydoc.info.

Do you want to test Mailboxer?

Thanks to Roman Kushnir (@RKushnir) you can test Mailboxer with this sample app.

I need a GUI!

If you need a GUI you should take a look at these links:

Contributors


Author: mailboxer
Source code: https://github.com/mailboxer/mailboxer
License: MIT license

#ruby  #ruby-on-rails 

Josefa  Corwin

Josefa Corwin

1659852060

A Template Language That Completely Separates Structure and Logic/Ruby

Curly

Curly is a template language that completely separates structure and logic. Instead of interspersing your HTML with snippets of Ruby, all logic is moved to a presenter class.

Installing

Installing Curly is as simple as running gem install curly-templates. If you're using Bundler to manage your dependencies, add this to your Gemfile

gem 'curly-templates'

Curly can also install an application layout file, replacing the .erb file commonly created by Rails. If you wish to use this, run the curly:install generator.

$ rails generate curly:install

How to use Curly

In order to use Curly for a view or partial, use the suffix .curly instead of .erb, e.g. app/views/posts/_comment.html.curly. Curly will look for a corresponding presenter class named Posts::CommentPresenter. By convention, these are placed in app/presenters/, so in this case the presenter would reside in app/presenters/posts/comment_presenter.rb. Note that presenters for partials are not prepended with an underscore.

Add some HTML to the partial template along with some Curly components:

<!-- app/views/posts/_comment.html.curly -->
<div class="comment">
  <p>
    {{author_link}} posted {{time_ago}} ago.
  </p>

  {{body}}

  {{#author?}}
    <p>{{deletion_link}}</p>
  {{/author?}}
</div>

The presenter will be responsible for providing the data for the components. Add the necessary Ruby code to the presenter:

# app/presenters/posts/comment_presenter.rb
class Posts::CommentPresenter < Curly::Presenter
  presents :comment

  def body
    SafeMarkdown.render(@comment.body)
  end

  def author_link
    link_to @comment.author.name, @comment.author, rel: "author"
  end

  def deletion_link
    link_to "Delete", @comment, method: :delete
  end

  def time_ago
    time_ago_in_words(@comment.created_at)
  end

  def author?
    @comment.author == current_user
  end
end

The partial can now be rendered like any other, e.g. by calling

render 'comment', comment: comment
render comment
render collection: post.comments

Curly components are surrounded by curly brackets, e.g. {{hello}}. They always map to a public method on the presenter class, in this case #hello. Methods ending in a question mark can be used for conditional blocks, e.g. {{#admin?}} ... {{/admin?}}.

Identifiers

Curly components can specify an identifier using the so-called dot notation: {{x.y.z}}. This can be very useful if the data you're accessing is hierarchical in nature. One common example is I18n:

<h1>{{i18n.homepage.header}}</h1>
# In the presenter, the identifier is passed as an argument to the method. The
# argument will always be a String.
def i18n(key)
  translate(key)
end

The identifier is separated from the component name with a dot. If the presenter method has a default value for the argument, the identifier is optional – otherwise it's mandatory.

Attributes

In addition to an identifier, Curly components can be annotated with attributes. These are key-value pairs that affect how a component is rendered.

The syntax is reminiscent of HTML:

<div>{{sidebar rows=3 width=200px title="I'm the sidebar!"}}</div>

The presenter method that implements the component must have a matching keyword argument:

def sidebar(rows: "1", width: "100px", title:); end

All argument values will be strings. A compilation error will be raised if

  • an attribute is used in a component without a matching keyword argument being present in the method definition; or
  • a required keyword argument in the method definition is not set as an attribute in the component.

You can define default values using Ruby's own syntax. Additionally, if the presenter method accepts arbitrary keyword arguments using the **doublesplat syntax then all attributes will be valid for the component, e.g.

def greetings(**names)
  names.map {|name, greeting| "#{name}: #{greeting}!" }.join("\n")
end
{{greetings alice=hello bob=hi}}
<!-- The above would be rendered as: -->
alice: hello!
bob: hi!

Note that since keyword arguments in Ruby are represented as Symbol objects, which are not garbage collected in Ruby versions less than 2.2, accepting arbitrary attributes represents a security vulnerability if your application allows untrusted Curly templates to be rendered. Only use this feature with trusted templates if you're not on Ruby 2.2 yet.

Conditional blocks

If there is some content you only want rendered under specific circumstances, you can use conditional blocks. The {{#admin?}}...{{/admin?}} syntax will only render the content of the block if the admin? method on the presenter returns true, while the {{^admin?}}...{{/admin?}} syntax will only render the content if it returns false.

Both forms can have an identifier: {{#locale.en?}}...{{/locale.en?}} will only render the block if the locale? method on the presenter returns true given the argument "en". Here's how to implement that method in the presenter:

class SomePresenter < Curly::Presenter
  # Allows rendering content only if the locale matches a specified identifier.
  def locale?(identifier)
    current_locale == identifier
  end
end

Furthermore, attributes can be set on the block. These only need to be specified when opening the block, not when closing it:

{{#square? width=3 height=3}}
  <p>It's square!</p>
{{/square?}}

Attributes work the same way as they do for normal components.

Collection blocks

Sometimes you want to render one or more items within the current template, and splitting out a separate template and rendering that in the presenter is too much overhead. You can instead define the template that should be used to render the items inline in the current template using the collection block syntax.

Collection blocks are opened using an asterisk:

{{*comments}}
  <li>{{body}} ({{author_name}})</li>
{{/comments}}

The presenter will need to expose the method #comments, which should return a collection of objects:

class Posts::ShowPresenter < Curly::Presenter
  presents :post

  def comments
    @post.comments
  end
end

The template within the collection block will be used to render each item, and it will be backed by a presenter named after the component – in this case, comments. The name will be singularized and Curly will try to find the presenter class in the following order:

  • Posts::ShowPresenter::CommentPresenter
  • Posts::CommentPresenter
  • CommentPresenter

This allows you some flexibility with regards to how you want to organize these nested templates and presenters.

Note that the nested template will only have access to the methods on the nested presenter, but all variables passed to the "parent" presenter will be forwarded to the nested presenter. In addition, the current item in the collection will be passed, as well as that item's index in the collection:

class Posts::CommentPresenter < Curly::Presenter
  presents :post, :comment, :comment_counter

  def number
    # `comment_counter` is automatically set to the item's index in the collection,
    # starting with 1.
    @comment_counter
  end

  def body
    @comment.body
  end

  def author_name
    @comment.author.name
  end
end

Collection blocks are an alternative to splitting out a separate template and rendering that from the presenter – which solution is best depends on your use case.

Context blocks

While collection blocks allow you to define the template that should be used to render items in a collection right within the parent template, context blocks allow you to define the template for an arbitrary context. This is very powerful, and can be used to define widget-style components and helpers, and provide an easy way to work with structured data. Let's say you have a comment form on your page, and you'd rather keep the template inline. A simple template could look like:

<!-- post.html.curly -->
<h1>{{title}}</h1>
{{body}}

{{@comment_form}}
  <b>Name: </b> {{name_field}}<br>
  <b>E-mail: </b> {{email_field}}<br>
  {{comment_field}}

  {{submit_button}}
{{/comment_form}}

Note that an @ character is used to denote a context block. Like with collection blocks, a separate presenter class is used within the block, and a simple convention is used to find it. The name of the context component (in this case, comment_form) will be camel cased, and the current presenter's namespace will be searched:

class PostPresenter < Curly::Presenter
  presents :post
  def title; @post.title; end
  def body; markdown(@post.body); end

  # A context block method *must* take a block argument. The return value
  # of the method will be used when rendering. Calling the block argument will
  # render the nested template. If you pass a value when calling the block
  # argument it will be passed to the presenter.
  def comment_form(&block)
    form_for(Comment.new, &block)
  end

  # The presenter name is automatically deduced.
  class CommentFormPresenter < Curly::Presenter
    # The value passed to the block argument will be passed in a parameter named
    # after the component.
    presents :comment_form

    # Any parameters passed to the parent presenter will be forwarded to this
    # presenter as well.
    presents :post

    def name_field
      @comment_form.text_field :name
    end

    # ...
  end
end

Context blocks were designed to work well with Rails' helper methods such as form_for and content_tag, but you can also work directly with the block. For instance, if you want to directly control the value that is passed to the nested presenter, you can call the call method on the block yourself:

def author(&block)
  content_tag :div, class: "author" do
    # The return value of `call` will be the result of rendering the nested template
    # with the argument. You can post-process the string if you want.
    block.call(@post.author)
  end
end

Context shorthand syntax

If you find yourself opening a context block just in order to use a single component, e.g. {{@author}}{{name}}{{/author}}, you can use the shorthand syntax instead: {{author:name}}. This works for all component types, e.g.

{{#author:admin?}}
  <p>The author is an admin!</p>
{{/author:admin?}}

The syntax works for nested contexts as well, e.g. {{comment:author:name}}. Any identifier and attributes are passed to the target component, which in this example would be {{name}}.

Setting up state

Although most code in Curly presenters should be free of side effects, sometimes side effects are required. One common example is defining content for a content_for block.

If a Curly presenter class defines a setup! method, it will be called before the view is rendered:

class PostPresenter < Curly::Presenter
  presents :post

  def setup!
    content_for :title, post.title

    content_for :sidebar do
      render 'post_sidebar', post: post
    end
  end
end

Escaping Curly syntax

In order to have {{ appear verbatim in the rendered HTML, use the triple Curly escape syntax:

This is {{{escaped}}.

You don't need to escape the closing }}.

Comments

If you want to add comments to your Curly templates that are not visible in the rendered HTML, use the following syntax:

{{! This is some interesting stuff }}

Presenters

Presenters are classes that inherit from Curly::Presenter – they're usually placed in app/presenters/, but you can put them anywhere you'd like. The name of the presenter classes match the virtual path of the view they're part of, so if your controller is rendering posts/show, the Posts::ShowPresenter class will be used. Note that Curly is only used to render a view if a template can be found – in this case, at app/views/posts/show.html.curly.

Presenters can declare a list of accepted variables using the presents method:

class Posts::ShowPresenter < Curly::Presenter
  presents :post
end

A variable can have a default value:

class Posts::ShowPresenter < Curly::Presenter
  presents :post
  presents :comment, default: nil
end

Any public method defined on the presenter is made available to the template as a component:

class Posts::ShowPresenter < Curly::Presenter
  presents :post

  def title
    @post.title
  end

  def author_link
    # You can call any Rails helper from within a presenter instance:
    link_to author.name, profile_path(author), rel: "author"
  end

  private

  # Private methods are not available to the template, so they're safe to
  # use.
  def author
    @post.author
  end
end

Presenter methods can even take an argument. Say your Curly template has the content {{t.welcome_message}}, where welcome_message is an I18n key. The following presenter method would make the lookup work:

def t(key)
  translate(key)
end

That way, simple ``functions'' can be added to the Curly language. Make sure these do not have any side effects, though, as an important part of Curly is the idempotence of the templates.

Layouts and content blocks

Both layouts and content blocks (see content_for) use yield to signal that content can be inserted. Curly works just like ERB, so calling yield with no arguments will make the view usable as a layout, while passing a Symbol will make it try to read a content block with the given name:

# Given you have the following Curly template in
# app/views/layouts/application.html.curly
#
#   <html>
#     <head>
#       <title>{{title}}</title>
#     </head>
#     <body>
#       <div id="sidebar">{{sidebar}}</div>
#       {{body}}
#     </body>
#   </html>
#
class ApplicationLayout < Curly::Presenter
  def title
    "You can use methods just like in any other presenter!"
  end

  def sidebar
    # A view can call `content_for(:sidebar) { "some HTML here" }`
    yield :sidebar
  end

  def body
    # The view will be rendered and inserted here:
    yield
  end
end

Rails helper methods

In order to make a Rails helper method available as a component in your template, use the exposes_helper method:

class Layouts::ApplicationPresenter < Curly::Presenter
  # The components {{sign_in_path}} and {{root_path}} are made available.
  exposes_helper :sign_in_path, :root_path
end

Testing

Presenters can be tested directly, but sometimes it makes sense to integrate with Rails on some levels. Currently, only RSpec is directly supported, but you can easily instantiate a presenter:

SomePresenter.new(context, assigns)

context is a view context, i.e. an object that responds to render, has all the helper methods you expect, etc. You can pass in a test double and see what you need to stub out. assigns is the hash containing the controller and local assigns. You need to pass in a key for each argument the presenter expects.

Testing with RSpec

In order to test presenters with RSpec, make sure you have rspec-rails in your Gemfile. Given the following presenter:

# app/presenters/posts/show_presenter.rb
class Posts::ShowPresenter < Curly::Presenter
  presents :post

  def body
    Markdown.render(@post.body)
  end
end

You can test the presenter methods like this:

# You can put this in your `spec_helper.rb`.
require 'curly/rspec'

# spec/presenters/posts/show_presenter_spec.rb
describe Posts::ShowPresenter, type: :presenter do
  describe "#body" do
    it "renders the post's body as Markdown" do
      assign(:post, double(:post, body: "**hello!**"))
      expect(presenter.body).to eq "<strong>hello!</strong>"
    end
  end
end

Note that your spec must be tagged with type: :presenter.

Examples

Here is a simple Curly template – it will be looked up by Rails automatically.

<!-- app/views/posts/show.html.curly -->
<h1>{{title}}<h1>
<p class="author">{{author}}</p>
<p>{{description}}</p>

{{comment_form}}

<div class="comments">
  {{comments}}
</div>

When rendering the template, a presenter is automatically instantiated with the variables assigned in the controller or the render call. The presenter declares the variables it expects with presents, which takes a list of variables names.

# app/presenters/posts/show_presenter.rb
class Posts::ShowPresenter < Curly::Presenter
  presents :post

  def title
    @post.title
  end

  def author
    link_to(@post.author.name, @post.author, rel: "author")
  end

  def description
    Markdown.new(@post.description).to_html.html_safe
  end

  def comments
    render 'comment', collection: @post.comments
  end

  def comment_form
    if @post.comments_allowed?
      render 'comment_form', post: @post
    else
      content_tag(:p, "Comments are disabled for this post")
    end
  end
end

Caching

Caching is handled at two levels in Curly – statically and dynamically. Static caching concerns changes to your code and templates introduced by deploys. If you do not wish to clear your entire cache every time you deploy, you need a way to indicate that some view, helper, or other piece of logic has changed.

Dynamic caching concerns changes that happen on the fly, usually made by your users in the running system. You wish to cache a view or a partial and have it expire whenever some data is updated – usually whenever a specific record is changed.

Dynamic Caching

Because of the way logic is contained in presenters, caching entire views or partials by the data they present becomes exceedingly straightforward. Simply define a #cache_key method that returns a non-nil object, and the return value will be used to cache the template.

Whereas in ERB you would include the cache call in the template itself:

<% cache([@post, signed_in?]) do %>
  ...
<% end %>

In Curly you would instead declare it in the presenter:

class Posts::ShowPresenter < Curly::Presenter
  presents :post

  def cache_key
    [@post, signed_in?]
  end
end

Likewise, you can add a #cache_duration method if you wish to automatically expire the fragment cache:

class Posts::ShowPresenter < Curly::Presenter
  ...

  def cache_duration
    30.minutes
  end
end

In order to set any cache option, define a #cache_options method that returns a Hash of options:

class Posts::ShowPresenter < Curly::Presenter
  ...

  def cache_options
    { compress: true, namespace: "my-app" }
  end
end

Static Caching

Static caching will only be enabled for presenters that define a non-nil #cache_key method (see Dynamic Caching.)

In order to make a deploy expire the cache for a specific view, set the version of the view to something new, usually by incrementing by one:

class Posts::ShowPresenter < Curly::Presenter
  version 3

  def cache_key
    # Some objects
  end
end

This will change the cache keys for all instances of that view, effectively expiring the old cache entries.

This works well for views, or for partials that are rendered in views that themselves are not cached. If the partial is nested within a view that is cached, however, the outer cache will not be expired. The solution is to register that the inner partial is a dependency of the outer one such that Curly can automatically deduce that the outer partial cache should be expired:

class Posts::ShowPresenter < Curly::Presenter
  version 3
  depends_on 'posts/comment'

  def cache_key
    # Some objects
  end
end

class Posts::CommentPresenter < Curly::Presenter
  version 4

  def cache_key
    # Some objects
  end
end

Now, if the version of Posts::CommentPresenter is bumped, the cache keys for both presenters would change. You can register any number of view paths with depends_on.

Curly integrates well with the caching mechanism in Rails 4 (or Cache Digests in Rails 3), so the dependencies defined with depends_on will be tracked by Rails. This will allow you to deploy changes to your templates and have the relevant caches automatically expire.

Thanks

Thanks to Zendesk for sponsoring the work on Curly.

Contributors

Build Status


Author: zendesk
Source code: https://github.com/zendesk/curly

#ruby   #ruby-on-rails 

Nat  Grady

Nat Grady

1660108440

Wordcloud2: R interface to Wordcloud for Data Visualization

wordcloud2

R interface to wordcloud for data visualization. Timdream's wordcloud2.js is used in this package.

Original description

Installation

devtools::install_github("lchiffon/wordcloud2")

knitr and shiny is support in wordcloud2 package.

Example

library(wordcloud2)
wordcloud2(demoFreq, size = 1,shape = 'star')

1

wordcloud2(demoFreq, size = 2, minRotation = -pi/2, maxRotation = -pi/2)

1

wordcloud2(demoFreq, size = 2, minRotation = -pi/6, maxRotation = -pi/6,
  rotateRatio = 1)

1

Chinese version

## Sys.setlocale("LC_CTYPE","eng")
wordcloud2(demoFreqC, size = 2, fontFamily = "微软雅黑",
           color = "random-light", backgroundColor = "grey")

1

Example of successfully deploying interactivate clickable wordcloud with special shape on R-shiny

Thanks JacobXPX's contribution to this feature:

Thanks AdamSpannbauer for pointing out the issues.

Additional features are added or modified:

hover information display are fixed, refering AdeelK93's previous work, thanks!

multiple wordclouds which seperatedly click are supported.

clickedWordInputId is changed to be automatically generated by: paste0(outputId, "_clicked_word")).

See sample below for more details:

library(shiny)
library(wordcloud2)
shinyApp(
  ui=shinyUI(fluidPage(
    #using default clicked word input id
    wordcloud2Output("my_wc", width = "50%", height = "400px"),
    #using custom clicked word input id
    wordcloud2Output("my_wc2", width = "50%", height = "400px"),
    
    verbatimTextOutput("print"),
    verbatimTextOutput("print2")
  )),
  server=shinyServer(function(input,output,session){
    
    figPath = system.file("examples/a.png",package = "wordcloud2")
    
    output$my_wc  = renderWordcloud2(wordcloud2(data = demoFreq, figPath = figPath, size = 0.4,color = "blue"))
    output$my_wc2 = renderWordcloud2(wordcloud2(demoFreq))
    
    #using default clicked word input id
    output$print  = renderPrint(input$my_wc_clicked_word)
    #using custom clicked word input id
    output$print2 = renderPrint(input$my_wc2_clicked_word)
  })
)

run the above code and click refresh, it will work.

1

contributors

Download Details:

Author: Lchiffon
Source Code: https://github.com/Lchiffon/wordcloud2 

#r #datavisualization