Beth  Cooper

Beth Cooper

1659694200

Easy Activity Tracking for Models, Similar to Github's Public Activity

PublicActivity

public_activity provides easy activity tracking for your ActiveRecord, Mongoid 3 and MongoMapper models in Rails 3 and 4.

Simply put: it can record what happens in your application and gives you the ability to present those recorded activities to users - in a similar way to how GitHub does it.

!! WARNING: README for unreleased version below. !!

You probably don't want to read the docs for this unreleased version 2.0.

For the stable 1.5.X readme see: https://github.com/chaps-io/public_activity/blob/1-5-stable/README.md

About

Here is a simple example showing what this gem is about:

Example usage

Tutorials

Screencast

Ryan Bates made a great screencast describing how to integrate Public Activity.

Tutorial

A great step-by-step guide on implementing activity feeds using public_activity by Ilya Bodrov.

Online demo

You can see an actual application using this gem here: http://public-activity-example.herokuapp.com/feed

The source code of the demo is hosted here: https://github.com/pokonski/activity_blog

Setup

Gem installation

You can install public_activity as you would any other gem:

gem install public_activity

or in your Gemfile:

gem 'public_activity'

Database setup

By default public_activity uses Active Record. If you want to use Mongoid or MongoMapper as your backend, create an initializer file in your Rails application with the corresponding code inside:

For Mongoid:

# config/initializers/public_activity.rb
PublicActivity.configure do |config|
  config.orm = :mongoid
end

For MongoMapper:

# config/initializers/public_activity.rb
PublicActivity.configure do |config|
  config.orm = :mongo_mapper
end

(ActiveRecord only) Create migration for activities and migrate the database (in your Rails project):

rails g public_activity:migration
rake db:migrate

Model configuration

Include PublicActivity::Model and add tracked to the model you want to keep track of:

For ActiveRecord:

class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked
end

For Mongoid:

class Article
  include Mongoid::Document
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked
end

For MongoMapper:

class Article
  include MongoMapper::Document
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked
end

And now, by default create/update/destroy activities are recorded in activities table. This is all you need to start recording activities for basic CRUD actions.

Optional: If you don't need #tracked but still want the comfort of #create_activity, you can include only the lightweight Common module instead of Model.

Custom activities

You can trigger custom activities by setting all your required parameters and triggering create_activity on the tracked model, like this:

@article.create_activity key: 'article.commented_on', owner: current_user

See this entry http://rubydoc.info/gems/public_activity/PublicActivity/Common:create_activity for more details.

Displaying activities

To display them you simply query the PublicActivity::Activity model:

# notifications_controller.rb
def index
  @activities = PublicActivity::Activity.all
end

And in your views:

<%= render_activities(@activities) %>

Note: render_activities is an alias for render_activity and does the same.

Layouts

You can also pass options to both activity#render and #render_activity methods, which are passed deeper to the internally used render_partial method. A useful example would be to render activities wrapped in layout, which shares common elements of an activity, like a timestamp, owner's avatar etc:

<%= render_activities(@activities, layout: :activity) %>

The activity will be wrapped with the app/views/layouts/_activity.html.erb layout, in the above example.

Important: please note that layouts for activities are also partials. Hence the _ prefix.

Locals

Sometimes, it's desirable to pass additional local variables to partials. It can be done this way:

<%= render_activity(@activity, locals: {friends: current_user.friends}) %>

Note: Before 1.4.0, one could pass variables directly to the options hash for #render_activity and access it from activity parameters. This functionality is retained in 1.4.0 and later, but the :locals method is preferred, since it prevents bugs from shadowing variables from activity parameters in the database.

Activity views

public_activity looks for views in app/views/public_activity.

For example, if you have an activity with :key set to "activity.user.changed_avatar", the gem will look for a partial in app/views/public_activity/user/_changed_avatar.html.(|erb|haml|slim|something_else).

Hint: the "activity." prefix in :key is completely optional and kept for backwards compatibility, you can skip it in new projects.

If you would like to fallback to a partial, you can utilize the fallback parameter to specify the path of a partial to use when one is missing:

<%= render_activity(@activity, fallback: 'default') %>

When used in this manner, if a partial with the specified :key cannot be located it will use the partial defined in the fallback instead. In the example above this would resolve to public_activity/_default.html.(|erb|haml|slim|something_else).

If a view file does not exist then ActionView::MisingTemplate will be raised. If you wish to fallback to the old behaviour and use an i18n based translation in this situation you can specify a :fallback parameter of text to fallback to this mechanism like such:

<%= render_activity(@activity, fallback: :text) %>

i18n

Translations are used by the #text method, to which you can pass additional options in form of a hash. #render method uses translations when view templates have not been provided. You can render pure i18n strings by passing {display: :i18n} to #render_activity or #render.

Translations should be put in your locale .yml files. To render pure strings from I18n Example structure:

activity:
  article:
    create: 'Article has been created'
    update: 'Someone has edited the article'
    destroy: 'Some user removed an article!'

This structure is valid for activities with keys "activity.article.create" or "article.create". As mentioned before, "activity." part of the key is optional.

Testing

For RSpec you can first disable public_activity and add require helper methods in the rails_helper.rb with:

#rails_helper.rb
require 'public_activity/testing'

PublicActivity.enabled = false

In your specs you can then blockwise decide whether to turn public_activity on or off.

# file_spec.rb
PublicActivity.with_tracking do
  # your test code goes here
end

PublicActivity.without_tracking do
  # your test code goes here
end

Documentation

For more documentation go here

Common examples

Set the Activity's owner to current_user by default

You can set up a default value for :owner by doing this:

  1. Include PublicActivity::StoreController in your ApplicationController like this:
class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
  include PublicActivity::StoreController
end
  1. Use Proc in :owner attribute for tracked class method in your desired model. For example:
class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  tracked owner: Proc.new{ |controller, model| controller.current_user }
end

Note: current_user applies to Devise, if you are using a different authentication gem or your own code, change the current_user to a method you use.

Disable tracking for a class or globally

If you need to disable tracking temporarily, for example in tests or db/seeds.rb then you can use PublicActivity.enabled= attribute like below:

# Disable p_a globally
PublicActivity.enabled = false

# Perform some operations that would normally be tracked by p_a:
Article.create(title: 'New article')

# Switch it back on
PublicActivity.enabled = true

You can also disable public_activity for a specific class:

# Disable p_a for Article class
Article.public_activity_off

# p_a will not do anything here:
@article = Article.create(title: 'New article')

# But will be enabled for other classes:
# (creation of the comment will be recorded if you are tracking the Comment class)
@article.comments.create(body: 'some comment!')

# Enable it again for Article:
Article.public_activity_on

Create custom activities

Besides standard, automatic activities created on CRUD actions on your model (deactivatable), you can post your own activities that can be triggered without modifying the tracked model. There are a few ways to do this, as PublicActivity gives three tiers of options to be set.

Instant options

Because every activity needs a key (otherwise: NoKeyProvided is raised), the shortest and minimal way to post an activity is:

@user.create_activity :mood_changed
# the key of the action will be user.mood_changed
@user.create_activity action: :mood_changed # this is exactly the same as above

Besides assigning your key (which is obvious from the code), it will take global options from User class (given in #tracked method during class definition) and overwrite them with instance options (set on @user by #activity method). You can read more about options and how PublicActivity inherits them for you here.

Note the action parameter builds the key like this: "#{model_name}.#{action}". You can read further on options for #create_activity here.

To provide more options, you can do:

@user.create_activity action: 'poke', parameters: {reason: 'bored'}, recipient: @friend, owner: current_user

In this example, we have provided all the things we could for a standard Activity.

Use custom fields on Activity

Besides the few fields that every Activity has (key, owner, recipient, trackable, parameters), you can also set custom fields. This could be very beneficial, as parameters are a serialized hash, which cannot be queried easily from the database. That being said, use custom fields when you know that you will set them very often and search by them (don't forget database indexes :) ).

Set owner and recipient based on associations

class Comment < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked owner: :commenter, recipient: :commentee

  belongs_to :commenter, :class_name => "User"
  belongs_to :commentee, :class_name => "User"
end

Resolve parameters from a Symbol or Proc

class Post < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked only: [:update], parameters: :tracked_values
  
  def tracked_values
   {}.tap do |hash|
     hash[:tags] = tags if tags_changed?
   end
  end
end

Setup

Skip this step if you are using ActiveRecord in Rails 4 or Mongoid

The first step is similar in every ORM available (except mongoid):

PublicActivity::Activity.class_eval do
  attr_accessible :custom_field
end

place this code under config/initializers/public_activity.rb, you have to create it first.

To be able to assign to that field, we need to move it to the mass assignment sanitizer's whitelist.

Migration

If you're using ActiveRecord, you will also need to provide a migration to add the actual field to the Activity. Taken from our tests:

class AddCustomFieldToActivities < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    change_table :activities do |t|
      t.string :custom_field
    end
  end
end

Assigning custom fields

Assigning is done by the same methods that you use for normal parameters: #tracked, #create_activity. You can just pass the name of your custom variable and assign its value. Even better, you can pass it to #tracked to tell us how to harvest your data for custom fields so we can do that for you.

class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked custom_field: proc {|controller, model| controller.some_helper }
end

Help

If you need help with using public_activity please visit our discussion group and ask a question there:

https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!forum/public-activity

Please do not ask general questions in the Github Issues.


Author: public-activity
Source code: https://github.com/public-activity/public_activity
License: MIT license

#ruby  #ruby-on-rails 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Easy Activity Tracking for Models, Similar to Github's Public Activity
Beth  Cooper

Beth Cooper

1659694200

Easy Activity Tracking for Models, Similar to Github's Public Activity

PublicActivity

public_activity provides easy activity tracking for your ActiveRecord, Mongoid 3 and MongoMapper models in Rails 3 and 4.

Simply put: it can record what happens in your application and gives you the ability to present those recorded activities to users - in a similar way to how GitHub does it.

!! WARNING: README for unreleased version below. !!

You probably don't want to read the docs for this unreleased version 2.0.

For the stable 1.5.X readme see: https://github.com/chaps-io/public_activity/blob/1-5-stable/README.md

About

Here is a simple example showing what this gem is about:

Example usage

Tutorials

Screencast

Ryan Bates made a great screencast describing how to integrate Public Activity.

Tutorial

A great step-by-step guide on implementing activity feeds using public_activity by Ilya Bodrov.

Online demo

You can see an actual application using this gem here: http://public-activity-example.herokuapp.com/feed

The source code of the demo is hosted here: https://github.com/pokonski/activity_blog

Setup

Gem installation

You can install public_activity as you would any other gem:

gem install public_activity

or in your Gemfile:

gem 'public_activity'

Database setup

By default public_activity uses Active Record. If you want to use Mongoid or MongoMapper as your backend, create an initializer file in your Rails application with the corresponding code inside:

For Mongoid:

# config/initializers/public_activity.rb
PublicActivity.configure do |config|
  config.orm = :mongoid
end

For MongoMapper:

# config/initializers/public_activity.rb
PublicActivity.configure do |config|
  config.orm = :mongo_mapper
end

(ActiveRecord only) Create migration for activities and migrate the database (in your Rails project):

rails g public_activity:migration
rake db:migrate

Model configuration

Include PublicActivity::Model and add tracked to the model you want to keep track of:

For ActiveRecord:

class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked
end

For Mongoid:

class Article
  include Mongoid::Document
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked
end

For MongoMapper:

class Article
  include MongoMapper::Document
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked
end

And now, by default create/update/destroy activities are recorded in activities table. This is all you need to start recording activities for basic CRUD actions.

Optional: If you don't need #tracked but still want the comfort of #create_activity, you can include only the lightweight Common module instead of Model.

Custom activities

You can trigger custom activities by setting all your required parameters and triggering create_activity on the tracked model, like this:

@article.create_activity key: 'article.commented_on', owner: current_user

See this entry http://rubydoc.info/gems/public_activity/PublicActivity/Common:create_activity for more details.

Displaying activities

To display them you simply query the PublicActivity::Activity model:

# notifications_controller.rb
def index
  @activities = PublicActivity::Activity.all
end

And in your views:

<%= render_activities(@activities) %>

Note: render_activities is an alias for render_activity and does the same.

Layouts

You can also pass options to both activity#render and #render_activity methods, which are passed deeper to the internally used render_partial method. A useful example would be to render activities wrapped in layout, which shares common elements of an activity, like a timestamp, owner's avatar etc:

<%= render_activities(@activities, layout: :activity) %>

The activity will be wrapped with the app/views/layouts/_activity.html.erb layout, in the above example.

Important: please note that layouts for activities are also partials. Hence the _ prefix.

Locals

Sometimes, it's desirable to pass additional local variables to partials. It can be done this way:

<%= render_activity(@activity, locals: {friends: current_user.friends}) %>

Note: Before 1.4.0, one could pass variables directly to the options hash for #render_activity and access it from activity parameters. This functionality is retained in 1.4.0 and later, but the :locals method is preferred, since it prevents bugs from shadowing variables from activity parameters in the database.

Activity views

public_activity looks for views in app/views/public_activity.

For example, if you have an activity with :key set to "activity.user.changed_avatar", the gem will look for a partial in app/views/public_activity/user/_changed_avatar.html.(|erb|haml|slim|something_else).

Hint: the "activity." prefix in :key is completely optional and kept for backwards compatibility, you can skip it in new projects.

If you would like to fallback to a partial, you can utilize the fallback parameter to specify the path of a partial to use when one is missing:

<%= render_activity(@activity, fallback: 'default') %>

When used in this manner, if a partial with the specified :key cannot be located it will use the partial defined in the fallback instead. In the example above this would resolve to public_activity/_default.html.(|erb|haml|slim|something_else).

If a view file does not exist then ActionView::MisingTemplate will be raised. If you wish to fallback to the old behaviour and use an i18n based translation in this situation you can specify a :fallback parameter of text to fallback to this mechanism like such:

<%= render_activity(@activity, fallback: :text) %>

i18n

Translations are used by the #text method, to which you can pass additional options in form of a hash. #render method uses translations when view templates have not been provided. You can render pure i18n strings by passing {display: :i18n} to #render_activity or #render.

Translations should be put in your locale .yml files. To render pure strings from I18n Example structure:

activity:
  article:
    create: 'Article has been created'
    update: 'Someone has edited the article'
    destroy: 'Some user removed an article!'

This structure is valid for activities with keys "activity.article.create" or "article.create". As mentioned before, "activity." part of the key is optional.

Testing

For RSpec you can first disable public_activity and add require helper methods in the rails_helper.rb with:

#rails_helper.rb
require 'public_activity/testing'

PublicActivity.enabled = false

In your specs you can then blockwise decide whether to turn public_activity on or off.

# file_spec.rb
PublicActivity.with_tracking do
  # your test code goes here
end

PublicActivity.without_tracking do
  # your test code goes here
end

Documentation

For more documentation go here

Common examples

Set the Activity's owner to current_user by default

You can set up a default value for :owner by doing this:

  1. Include PublicActivity::StoreController in your ApplicationController like this:
class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
  include PublicActivity::StoreController
end
  1. Use Proc in :owner attribute for tracked class method in your desired model. For example:
class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  tracked owner: Proc.new{ |controller, model| controller.current_user }
end

Note: current_user applies to Devise, if you are using a different authentication gem or your own code, change the current_user to a method you use.

Disable tracking for a class or globally

If you need to disable tracking temporarily, for example in tests or db/seeds.rb then you can use PublicActivity.enabled= attribute like below:

# Disable p_a globally
PublicActivity.enabled = false

# Perform some operations that would normally be tracked by p_a:
Article.create(title: 'New article')

# Switch it back on
PublicActivity.enabled = true

You can also disable public_activity for a specific class:

# Disable p_a for Article class
Article.public_activity_off

# p_a will not do anything here:
@article = Article.create(title: 'New article')

# But will be enabled for other classes:
# (creation of the comment will be recorded if you are tracking the Comment class)
@article.comments.create(body: 'some comment!')

# Enable it again for Article:
Article.public_activity_on

Create custom activities

Besides standard, automatic activities created on CRUD actions on your model (deactivatable), you can post your own activities that can be triggered without modifying the tracked model. There are a few ways to do this, as PublicActivity gives three tiers of options to be set.

Instant options

Because every activity needs a key (otherwise: NoKeyProvided is raised), the shortest and minimal way to post an activity is:

@user.create_activity :mood_changed
# the key of the action will be user.mood_changed
@user.create_activity action: :mood_changed # this is exactly the same as above

Besides assigning your key (which is obvious from the code), it will take global options from User class (given in #tracked method during class definition) and overwrite them with instance options (set on @user by #activity method). You can read more about options and how PublicActivity inherits them for you here.

Note the action parameter builds the key like this: "#{model_name}.#{action}". You can read further on options for #create_activity here.

To provide more options, you can do:

@user.create_activity action: 'poke', parameters: {reason: 'bored'}, recipient: @friend, owner: current_user

In this example, we have provided all the things we could for a standard Activity.

Use custom fields on Activity

Besides the few fields that every Activity has (key, owner, recipient, trackable, parameters), you can also set custom fields. This could be very beneficial, as parameters are a serialized hash, which cannot be queried easily from the database. That being said, use custom fields when you know that you will set them very often and search by them (don't forget database indexes :) ).

Set owner and recipient based on associations

class Comment < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked owner: :commenter, recipient: :commentee

  belongs_to :commenter, :class_name => "User"
  belongs_to :commentee, :class_name => "User"
end

Resolve parameters from a Symbol or Proc

class Post < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked only: [:update], parameters: :tracked_values
  
  def tracked_values
   {}.tap do |hash|
     hash[:tags] = tags if tags_changed?
   end
  end
end

Setup

Skip this step if you are using ActiveRecord in Rails 4 or Mongoid

The first step is similar in every ORM available (except mongoid):

PublicActivity::Activity.class_eval do
  attr_accessible :custom_field
end

place this code under config/initializers/public_activity.rb, you have to create it first.

To be able to assign to that field, we need to move it to the mass assignment sanitizer's whitelist.

Migration

If you're using ActiveRecord, you will also need to provide a migration to add the actual field to the Activity. Taken from our tests:

class AddCustomFieldToActivities < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    change_table :activities do |t|
      t.string :custom_field
    end
  end
end

Assigning custom fields

Assigning is done by the same methods that you use for normal parameters: #tracked, #create_activity. You can just pass the name of your custom variable and assign its value. Even better, you can pass it to #tracked to tell us how to harvest your data for custom fields so we can do that for you.

class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked custom_field: proc {|controller, model| controller.some_helper }
end

Help

If you need help with using public_activity please visit our discussion group and ask a question there:

https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!forum/public-activity

Please do not ask general questions in the Github Issues.


Author: public-activity
Source code: https://github.com/public-activity/public_activity
License: MIT license

#ruby  #ruby-on-rails 

Edison  Stark

Edison Stark

1603861600

How to Compare Multiple GitHub Projects with Our GitHub Stats tool

If you have project code hosted on GitHub, chances are you might be interested in checking some numbers and stats such as stars, commits and pull requests.

You might also want to compare some similar projects in terms of the above mentioned stats, for whatever reasons that interest you.

We have the right tool for you: the simple and easy-to-use little tool called GitHub Stats.

Let’s dive right in to what we can get out of it.

Getting started

This interactive tool is really easy to use. Follow the three steps below and you’ll get what you want in real-time:

1. Head to the GitHub repo of the tool

2. Enter as many projects as you need to check on

3. Hit the Update button beside each metric

In this article we are going to compare three most popular machine learning projects for you.

#github #tools #github-statistics-react #github-stats-tool #compare-github-projects #github-projects #software-development #programming

How To Activate Cash App Card - Online Activation

Cash App is a digital payment that permits users to send, receive or request cash online. Of course, you may first ought to install the Cash app on your mobile device, using Google Play or maybe the iTunes Store. Considering that the Cash App needs the use of a bank account, you may need to be over 18 years old to register. Cash App offers customers a free debit card, which matches like some other VISA card. If you’ve got a Cash App card, you don’t want to apply the mobile application, again and again, now swipe your card at pay at retail shops everywhere in the USA.

When you receive your cash app debit card, it’d be a defaulted card and you’ll now no longer be capable of using it immediately. As a result, you need to comply with a few steps to How To Activate Cash App Card. However, to make use of this card, it’s far obligatory to complete the Cash App card activation method. The card activation technique isn’t always very complicated. It may be executed with the assist of some easy steps. There are too many simple methods to activate a Cash App card—the cardboard activation with QR code and without it. Users also can do it via means of calling the Cash App phone number.

In case you are still facing cash app card activation issues, then you definitely have to touch the Cash App customer support. To activate Cash App card, you want to take those steps:

  • Open the Cash App on your device.
  • Click at the Cash card icon.
  • Then pick out the choice of activating a Cash App card.
  • Use your mobile camera for scanning the QR code.
  • Once you do it efficiently your cash card is prepared to apply

Also Read: Cash App Login || Cash App Customer Service || Cash App Direct Deposit

What are the limitations of a Cash Card?

The cash app has withdrawal limits much like all different ATM cards. Customers have the freedom to withdraw up to $250 in step with transaction and $1250 withinside the time-frame of 30 days. Besides this, you are not allowed to withdraw over $1,000 in 24 hours and $1,000 in a week. Cash App Direct Deposit, if you get in trouble at the same time as using a Cash card and want help associated with the same, you could always communicate to the executives who’re usually there to guide you. Feel free to touch the team whenever via the Cash App Phone Number that is always practical to guide you about How to activate cash app card. Whenever you’re in hassle, you could always method them to fix all of your problems withinside the nick of time.inheritor username.

Cash App introduced a new Cash App card for its users and if you want to activate it, a person desires to follow some steps on their devices both Mac or android. The great perk of activating a Cash app card is you don’t need to preserve cash with you. All features are just like popular bank accounts, such as debit cards, access to transactions, and many different features. The most crucial part about a Cash App is that you want to pay high-priced fees as service charges; the expenses charged through them are so low and inexpensive. Activate Cash App card and you could withdraw your desired amount directly out of your Cash App account through going to a standard ATM.

If you’re new to Cash App and want guidance on how to use it, you could usually talk to the team members through contacting them on the Cash App Toll Free Number that is active round the clock. Connect with the team every time to talk about your issue and clear up all queries in no time. The team tells each and each answer in detail in order that the user does now no longer face any error at the same time as executing them. Talk to the team and let them recognize your errors.

#how to activate cash app card #activate cash app card #cash app card activation #activate replacement cash app card #cash app activation number #cash card activation help

Alex Colmen

1623751848

What is Cash App and how does Activate My Cash App Card?

Cash App is a smart phone payment app that is advanced through Square. Inc. The payments app permits users to transfer cash to 1 any other. Square Company added square cash for businesses functions for individuals, various companies, business proprietors for sending, receiving money which recognized as $cash tag.

The app allows its users for inquiring for and transferring money from one cash account to any other thru cash app or e-mail. It also allow users to withdraw cash thru its debit visa card called as cash card in ATM or any local bank account.

Cash App recorded approximately 7 million active users are in the month of February 18th in year 2018. In the month of January the app commenced the provider of helping bitcoin trading. It has its cash card that is black in Color. It is used for withdrawing money from ATM or bank account.

The card is customizable and may be used by signing at the Mobile App after which sign will be printed on the app and dispatched to person. Square cash company had added their different username which is known as $cashtag. It enables its users in transferring and requesting cash from unique users through coming into such user name. Cash card may be used everywhere in each online payments and in stores also.

How To Activate Cash App Card

When it involves a dependable money transfer app, the name of the Cash app comes into the limelight. Developed and advertised through Square Inc. it’s miles introduced in the market place with an purpose to cater to financial needs. This provider facilitates the users to transfer funds, receive cash requests, pay app bills, and many more. Most importantly, you may also purchase digital currencies including Bitcoin and invest in the stock market place. Like a bank account, it also offers its registered account holders a debit card (better known as Cash Card). With the help of a Cash app card, you may make payments, withdraw cash, and also do various things. To employ this kind of wonderful card, you want to Activate Cash App Card after you get it.

In the blog below, we’re going to share some essential information about the way to activate your cash app card. Moreover, you may also make yourself aware about additional helpful information about the Cash card. Hence, you want to consult the manual right here and find out a better way to use the Cash card to its fullest.

Easy steps to activate cash app card?

To activate your Cash Card the use of the QR code that arrived with it:
• Click the Cash Card tab to your Cash App home screen
• Click the picture of your Cash Card
• Click Activate Cash Card
• Click OK whilst your Cash App asks to apply your digital camera
• Line your digital camera up with the QR code till it comes into focus

Cash App Card Activation With A QR Code

Upon reception of your cash app card, you may also accept an activation QR code. You will want this code to activate your card, the usage of the following steps:

  1. The first issue is to open up the Cash App to your smart phone. Once you open up the app, click the balance amount on your Cash App screen (top middle of the home screen). If your account balance is $0, tap “Cash & BTC”.
  2. Look for the image of your Cash Card and click on it. A listing of alternatives will pop-up, tap “Scan QR Code”.
  3. When Cash App requests permission to apply your smart phone’s camera, click “OK”. Place your smart phone of the QR code in order that it could be visible immediately via the camera. Once the app procedures the QR code information, your card will be officially activated.

Also Know: Cash App Login

Cash App Card Activation Without A QR Code

Unlike the opposite payment apps, Square Cash App we could the users activate their cash cards through scanning a code. Basically, this technique is referred to as automatic or without a card technique. Why? Because on this technique users do not require to have access to a cash card. What matters most is only a QR code. Moreover, it’s also really well worth noting that a Cash App card constantly comes with an different QR code with the shipping of the brand new coins card. If you have also were given your brand new card, follow these steps to activate your Cash App Visa Debit in Cash App on smart phone.
• Navigate to the Cash App mobile app to your phone.
• Then, the next step is to choose a cash-card icon to be had on the home display from the left corner.
• Further, from the drop down menu choose “Activate cash card” to feature a life to it.
• Now Square Cash App might ask you to grant permission to get right of entry to your smart phone’s camera.
• Allow Cash App to have access to your phone’s digital camera to scan a QR code.
• Now set your smart phone camera’s focus to your QR code and scan it.
• Upon a success scanning a QR code, your cash card will all set ready to spend money.

How to Activate Cash App Card on Phone and Computer?

Undoubtedly, the consistent and rapid development in the banking device has resulted in the major relief to the people who ship and get hold of cash online. However, notwithstanding having superior net era and smart phones, some range of demanding situations nevertheless exist with inside the fee device. To triumph over a vast variety of troubles along with fee failure, slow, and slow cash transfer problem, Cash App by Square may be the first-rate answer. More specifically, a Cash App card can genuinely do wonders on the subject of making fee after shopping. Before the whole thing else, be informed that the cash card is difficulty to the activation system. In order to attract the most advantages, you should learn how to activate Cash App card?

As you’re studying this assisting post, possibilities are excessive which you do not have an concept about how you can activate your Cash App card on Cash App payment app. If so, appearance no further. To help you recognize the step by step system to activate a cash card, I am going to reply a number of the important questions.

In case if any of you isn’t a super fan of reading, they can touch and talk to the Cash App consultant directly. Alternatively, scroll down and keep to study this helping post. To be extra clearer, with the aid of using studying this post, you may learn the 2 simple ways to activate a Cash App Debit Card. So, let’s recover from to the first approach to activate a cash card by scanning a QR code.

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Jolie  Reichert

Jolie Reichert

1595581560

Stay Safe on GitHub: Security Practices to Follow

gthen Access Controls

Implementing proper access control is one of the best practices for enhancing security, not only on GitHub but in every other environment where code security is imperative.

GitHub offers several options that users can employ to reduce the risk of improper exposure. But to start with, it is important to employ the least privilege model where users are only granted necessary permissions.

Here are some basic access control guidelines that you should follow:

  • Restrict the creation of repositories to prevent users from exposing organization information in public repositories.
  • Enable branch protection and status checks to ensure users can merge commits or manipulate branches safely.
  • Allow or disallow forking private repositories to ensure users do not expose or share organizational code with unauthorized parties.
  • Revoke access for all inactive users who are no longer part of the contributors.
  • Review access rights to your GitHub projects periodically.
  • Ensure users do not share GitHub accounts or passwords.
  • Ensure every contributor uses two-factor authentication on their account.
  • Rotate personal access tokens and SSH keys

Never Store Credentials in Your GitHub Files

Leaking secrets to your GitHub repositories, either through code, configuration files, or commit messages, provides a gateway for attacks.

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