MySQL vs PostgreSQL - What to Choose the Right Database for Your Project

Perhaps you’re building a brand new project. Or maybe your current database isn’t working well. Choosing the right database for your project can be given by MySQL or PostgreSQL?

The choice of a database management system is usually an afterthought when starting a new project, especially on the Web. Most frameworks come with some object-relational mapping tool (ORM) which more or less hides the differences between the different platforms and makes them all equally slow. Using the default option (MySQL in most cases) is rarely wrong, but it’s worth considering. Don’t fall into the trap of familiarity and comfort – a good developer must always make informed decisions among the different options, their benefits and drawbacks.

Database Performance

Historically, MySQL has had a reputation as an extremely fast database for read-heavy workloads, sometimes at the cost of concurrency when mixed with write operations.

PostgreSQL, also known as Postgres, advertises itself as “the most advanced open-source relational database in the world”. It was built to be feature-rich, extendable and standards-compliant. In the past, Postgres performance was more balanced - reads were generally slower than MySQL, but it was capable of writing large amounts of data more efficiently, and it handled concurrency better.

The performance differences between MySQL and Postgres have been largely erased in recent versions. MySQL is still very fast at reading data, but only if using the old MyISAM engine. If using InnoDB (which allows transactions, key constraints, and other important features), differences are negligible (if they even exist). These features are absolutely critical to enterprise or consumer-scale applications, so using the old engine is not an option. On the other hand, MySQL has also been optimized to reduce the gap when it comes to heavy data writes.

When choosing between MySQL and PostgreSQL, performance should not be a factor for most run-of-the-mill applications – it will be good enough in either case, even if you consider expected future growth. Both platforms are perfectly capable of replication, and many cloud providers offer managed scalable versions of either database. Therefore, it’s worth it to consider the other advantages of Postgres over MySQL before you start your next project with the default database setting.

Postgres Advantages over MySQL

Postgres is an object-relational database, while MySQL is a purely relational database. This means that Postgres includes features like table inheritance and function overloading, which can be important to certain applications. Postgres also adheres more closely to SQL standards.

Postgres handles concurrency better than MySQL for multiple reasons:

Postgres implements Multiversion Concurrency Control (MVCC) without read locks Postgres supports parallel query plans that can use multiple CPUs/cores Postgres can create indexes in a non-blocking way (through the CREATE INDEX CONCURRENTLY syntax), and it can create partial indexes (for example, if you have a model with soft deletes, you can create an index that ignores records marked as deleted) Postgres is known for protecting data integrity at the transaction level. This makes it less vulnerable to data corruption.

Default Installation and Extensibility of Postgres and MySQL

The default installation of Postgres generally works better than the default of MySQL (but you can tweak MySQL to compensate). MySQL has some outright weird default settings (for example, for character encoding and collation).

Postgres is highly extensible. It supports a number of advanced data types not available in MySQL (geometric/GIS, network address types, JSONB which can be indexed, native UUID, timezone-aware timestamps). If this is not enough, you can also add your own datatypes, operators, and index types.

Postgres is truly open-source and community-driven, while MySQL has had some licensing issues. It was started as a company product (with a free and a paid version) and Oracle’s acquisition of MySQL AB in 2010 has led to some concerns among developers about its future open source status. However, there are several open source forks of the original MySQL (MariaDB, Percona, etc.), so this is not considered a huge risk at the moment.

When to Use MySQL

Despite all of these advantages, there are still some small drawbacks to using Postgres that you should consider.

Postgres is still less popular than MySQL (despite catching up in recent years), so there’s a smaller number of 3rd party tools, or developers/database administrators available.

Postgres forks a new process for each new client connection which allocates a non-trivial amount of memory (about 10 MB).

Postgres is built with extensibility, standards compliance, scalability, and data integrity in mind - sometimes at the expense of speed. Therefore, for simple, read-heavy workflows, Postgres might be a worse choice than MySQL.

These are only some of the factors a developer might want to consider when choosing a database. Additionally, your platform provider might have a preference, for instance Heroku prefers Postgres and offers operational benefits to running it. Your framework may also prefer one over the other by offering better drivers. And as ever, your coworkers may have opinions!

#database #mysql #postgresql #web-development

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MySQL vs PostgreSQL - What to Choose the Right Database for Your Project
Joe  Hoppe

Joe Hoppe

1595905879

Best MySQL DigitalOcean Performance – ScaleGrid vs. DigitalOcean Managed Databases

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MySQL is the all-time number one open source database in the world, and a staple in RDBMS space. DigitalOcean is quickly building its reputation as the developers cloud by providing an affordable, flexible and easy to use cloud platform for developers to work with. MySQL on DigitalOcean is a natural fit, but what’s the best way to deploy your cloud database? In this post, we are going to compare the top two providers, DigitalOcean Managed Databases for MySQL vs. ScaleGrid MySQL hosting on DigitalOcean.

At a glance – TLDR
ScaleGrid Blog - At a glance overview - 1st pointCompare Throughput
ScaleGrid averages almost 40% higher throughput over DigitalOcean for MySQL, with up to 46% higher throughput in write-intensive workloads. Read now

ScaleGrid Blog - At a glance overview - 2nd pointCompare Latency
On average, ScaleGrid achieves almost 30% lower latency over DigitalOcean for the same deployment configurations. Read now

ScaleGrid Blog - At a glance overview - 3rd pointCompare Pricing
ScaleGrid provides 30% more storage on average vs. DigitalOcean for MySQL at the same affordable price. Read now

MySQL DigitalOcean Performance Benchmark
In this benchmark, we compare equivalent plan sizes between ScaleGrid MySQL on DigitalOcean and DigitalOcean Managed Databases for MySQL. We are going to use a common, popular plan size using the below configurations for this performance benchmark:

Comparison Overview
ScaleGridDigitalOceanInstance TypeMedium: 4 vCPUsMedium: 4 vCPUsMySQL Version8.0.208.0.20RAM8GB8GBSSD140GB115GBDeployment TypeStandaloneStandaloneRegionSF03SF03SupportIncludedBusiness-level support included with account sizes over $500/monthMonthly Price$120$120

As you can see above, ScaleGrid and DigitalOcean offer the same plan configurations across this plan size, apart from SSD where ScaleGrid provides over 20% more storage for the same price.

To ensure the most accurate results in our performance tests, we run the benchmark four times for each comparison to find the average performance across throughput and latency over read-intensive workloads, balanced workloads, and write-intensive workloads.

Throughput
In this benchmark, we measure MySQL throughput in terms of queries per second (QPS) to measure our query efficiency. To quickly summarize the results, we display read-intensive, write-intensive and balanced workload averages below for 150 threads for ScaleGrid vs. DigitalOcean MySQL:

ScaleGrid MySQL vs DigitalOcean Managed Databases - Throughput Performance Graph

For the common 150 thread comparison, ScaleGrid averages almost 40% higher throughput over DigitalOcean for MySQL, with up to 46% higher throughput in write-intensive workloads.

#cloud #database #developer #digital ocean #mysql #performance #scalegrid #95th percentile latency #balanced workloads #developers cloud #digitalocean droplet #digitalocean managed databases #digitalocean performance #digitalocean pricing #higher throughput #latency benchmark #lower latency #mysql benchmark setup #mysql client threads #mysql configuration #mysql digitalocean #mysql latency #mysql on digitalocean #mysql throughput #performance benchmark #queries per second #read-intensive #scalegrid mysql #scalegrid vs. digitalocean #throughput benchmark #write-intensive

Loma  Baumbach

Loma Baumbach

1595774031

ScaleGrid DigitalOcean Support for MySQL, PostgreSQL and Redis™

PALO ALTO, Calif., June 9, 2020 – ScaleGrid, a leading Database-as-a-Service (DBaaS) provider, has just announced support for their MySQLPostgreSQL and Redis™ solutions on DigitalOcean. This launch is in addition to their current DigitalOcean offering for MongoDB® database, the only DBaaS to support this database on DigitalOcean.

MySQL and PostgreSQL are the top two open source relational databases in the world, and Redis is the top key-value database. These databases are a natural fit for the developer market that has gravitated towards DigitalOcean since its launch just nine years ago in 2011. The open source model is not only popular with the developer market, but also enterprise companies looking to modernize their infrastructure and reduce spend.  DigitalOcean instance costs are also over 28% less expensive than AWS, and over 26% less than Azure, providing significant savings for companies who are struggling in this global climate.

ScaleGrid’s MySQL, PostgreSQL and Redis™ solutions on DigitalOcean are competitively priced starting at just $15/GB, the same as DigitalOcean’s Managed Database solution, but offer on average 30% more storage for the same price. Additionally, ScaleGrid offers several competitive advantages such as full superuser access, custom master-slave configurations, and advanced slow query analysis and monitoring capabilities through their sophisticated platform. To compare more features, check out their ScaleGrid vs. DigitalOcean MySQLScaleGrid vs. DigitalOcean PostgreSQL and ScaleGrid vs. DigitalOcean Redis™ pages.

#cloud #database #developer #digital ocean #mysql #postgresql #redis #scalegrid #advanced performance #database infrastructure #dbaas on digitalocean #digitalocean customers #digitalocean instance costs #digitalocean managed databases #high performance ssd #mysql digitalocean #postgresql digitalocean #redis digitalocean #scalegrid digitalocean #scalegrid vs. digitalocean

MySQL vs PostgreSQL - What to Choose the Right Database for Your Project

Perhaps you’re building a brand new project. Or maybe your current database isn’t working well. Choosing the right database for your project can be given by MySQL or PostgreSQL?

The choice of a database management system is usually an afterthought when starting a new project, especially on the Web. Most frameworks come with some object-relational mapping tool (ORM) which more or less hides the differences between the different platforms and makes them all equally slow. Using the default option (MySQL in most cases) is rarely wrong, but it’s worth considering. Don’t fall into the trap of familiarity and comfort – a good developer must always make informed decisions among the different options, their benefits and drawbacks.

Database Performance

Historically, MySQL has had a reputation as an extremely fast database for read-heavy workloads, sometimes at the cost of concurrency when mixed with write operations.

PostgreSQL, also known as Postgres, advertises itself as “the most advanced open-source relational database in the world”. It was built to be feature-rich, extendable and standards-compliant. In the past, Postgres performance was more balanced - reads were generally slower than MySQL, but it was capable of writing large amounts of data more efficiently, and it handled concurrency better.

The performance differences between MySQL and Postgres have been largely erased in recent versions. MySQL is still very fast at reading data, but only if using the old MyISAM engine. If using InnoDB (which allows transactions, key constraints, and other important features), differences are negligible (if they even exist). These features are absolutely critical to enterprise or consumer-scale applications, so using the old engine is not an option. On the other hand, MySQL has also been optimized to reduce the gap when it comes to heavy data writes.

When choosing between MySQL and PostgreSQL, performance should not be a factor for most run-of-the-mill applications – it will be good enough in either case, even if you consider expected future growth. Both platforms are perfectly capable of replication, and many cloud providers offer managed scalable versions of either database. Therefore, it’s worth it to consider the other advantages of Postgres over MySQL before you start your next project with the default database setting.

Postgres Advantages over MySQL

Postgres is an object-relational database, while MySQL is a purely relational database. This means that Postgres includes features like table inheritance and function overloading, which can be important to certain applications. Postgres also adheres more closely to SQL standards.

Postgres handles concurrency better than MySQL for multiple reasons:

Postgres implements Multiversion Concurrency Control (MVCC) without read locks Postgres supports parallel query plans that can use multiple CPUs/cores Postgres can create indexes in a non-blocking way (through the CREATE INDEX CONCURRENTLY syntax), and it can create partial indexes (for example, if you have a model with soft deletes, you can create an index that ignores records marked as deleted) Postgres is known for protecting data integrity at the transaction level. This makes it less vulnerable to data corruption.

Default Installation and Extensibility of Postgres and MySQL

The default installation of Postgres generally works better than the default of MySQL (but you can tweak MySQL to compensate). MySQL has some outright weird default settings (for example, for character encoding and collation).

Postgres is highly extensible. It supports a number of advanced data types not available in MySQL (geometric/GIS, network address types, JSONB which can be indexed, native UUID, timezone-aware timestamps). If this is not enough, you can also add your own datatypes, operators, and index types.

Postgres is truly open-source and community-driven, while MySQL has had some licensing issues. It was started as a company product (with a free and a paid version) and Oracle’s acquisition of MySQL AB in 2010 has led to some concerns among developers about its future open source status. However, there are several open source forks of the original MySQL (MariaDB, Percona, etc.), so this is not considered a huge risk at the moment.

When to Use MySQL

Despite all of these advantages, there are still some small drawbacks to using Postgres that you should consider.

Postgres is still less popular than MySQL (despite catching up in recent years), so there’s a smaller number of 3rd party tools, or developers/database administrators available.

Postgres forks a new process for each new client connection which allocates a non-trivial amount of memory (about 10 MB).

Postgres is built with extensibility, standards compliance, scalability, and data integrity in mind - sometimes at the expense of speed. Therefore, for simple, read-heavy workflows, Postgres might be a worse choice than MySQL.

These are only some of the factors a developer might want to consider when choosing a database. Additionally, your platform provider might have a preference, for instance Heroku prefers Postgres and offers operational benefits to running it. Your framework may also prefer one over the other by offering better drivers. And as ever, your coworkers may have opinions!

#database #mysql #postgresql #web-development

Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1593867420

Top Android Projects with Source Code

Android Projects with Source Code – Your entry pass into the world of Android

Hello Everyone, welcome to this article, which is going to be really important to all those who’re in dilemma for their projects and the project submissions. This article is also going to help you if you’re an enthusiast looking forward to explore and enhance your Android skills. The reason is that we’re here to provide you the best ideas of Android Project with source code that you can choose as per your choice.

These project ideas are simple suggestions to help you deal with the difficulty of choosing the correct projects. In this article, we’ll see the project ideas from beginners level and later we’ll move on to intermediate to advance.

top android projects with source code

Android Projects with Source Code

Before working on real-time projects, it is recommended to create a sample hello world project in android studio and get a flavor of project creation as well as execution: Create your first android project

Android Projects for beginners

1. Calculator

build a simple calculator app in android studio source code

Android Project: A calculator will be an easy application if you have just learned Android and coding for Java. This Application will simply take the input values and the operation to be performed from the users. After taking the input it’ll return the results to them on the screen. This is a really easy application and doesn’t need use of any particular package.

To make a calculator you’d need Android IDE, Kotlin/Java for coding, and for layout of your application, you’d need XML or JSON. For this, coding would be the same as that in any language, but in the form of an application. Not to forget creating a calculator initially will increase your logical thinking.

Once the user installs the calculator, they’re ready to use it even without the internet. They’ll enter the values, and the application will show them the value after performing the given operations on the entered operands.

Source Code: Simple Calculator Project

2. A Reminder App

Android Project: This is a good project for beginners. A Reminder App can help you set reminders for different events that you have throughout the day. It’ll help you stay updated with all your tasks for the day. It can be useful for all those who are not so good at organizing their plans and forget easily. This would be a simple application just whose task would be just to remind you of something at a particular time.

To make a Reminder App you need to code in Kotlin/Java and design the layout using XML or JSON. For the functionality of the app, you’d need to make use of AlarmManager Class and Notifications in Android.

In this, the user would be able to set reminders and time in the application. Users can schedule reminders that would remind them to drink water again and again throughout the day. Or to remind them of their medications.

3. Quiz Application

Android Project: Another beginner’s level project Idea can be a Quiz Application in android. Here you can provide the users with Quiz on various general knowledge topics. These practices will ensure that you’re able to set the layouts properly and slowly increase your pace of learning the Android application development. In this you’ll learn to use various Layout components at the same time understanding them better.

To make a quiz application you’ll need to code in Java and set layouts using xml or java whichever you prefer. You can also use JSON for the layouts whichever preferable.

In the app, questions would be asked and answers would be shown as multiple choices. The user selects the answer and gets shown on the screen if the answers are correct. In the end the final marks would be shown to the users.

4. Simple Tic-Tac-Toe

android project tic tac toe game app

Android Project: Tic-Tac-Toe is a nice game, I guess most of you all are well aware of it. This will be a game for two players. In this android game, users would be putting X and O in the given 9 parts of a box one by one. The first player to arrange X or O in an adjacent line of three wins.

To build this game, you’d need Java and XML for Android Studio. And simply apply the logic on that. This game will have a set of three matches. So, it’ll also have a scoreboard. This scoreboard will show the final result at the end of one complete set.

Upon entering the game they’ll enter their names. And that’s when the game begins. They’ll touch one of the empty boxes present there and get their turn one by one. At the end of the game, there would be a winner declared.

Source Code: Tic Tac Toe Game Project

5. Stopwatch

Android Project: A stopwatch is another simple android project idea that will work the same as a normal handheld timepiece that measures the time elapsed between its activation and deactivation. This application will have three buttons that are: start, stop, and hold.

This application would need to use Java and XML. For this application, we need to set the timer properly as it is initially set to milliseconds, and that should be converted to minutes and then hours properly. The users can use this application and all they’d need to do is, start the stopwatch and then stop it when they are done. They can also pause the timer and continue it again when they like.

6. To Do App

Android Project: This is another very simple project idea for you as a beginner. This application as the name suggests will be a To-Do list holding app. It’ll store the users schedules and their upcoming meetings or events. In this application, users will be enabled to write their important notes as well. To make it safe, provide a login page before the user can access it.

So, this app will have a login page, sign-up page, logout system, and the area to write their tasks, events, or important notes. You can build it in android studio using Java and XML at ease. Using XML you can build the user interface as user-friendly as you can. And to store the users’ data, you can use SQLite enabling the users to even delete the data permanently.

Now for users, they will sign up and get access to the write section. Here the users can note down the things and store them permanently. Users can also alter the data or delete them. Finally, they can logout and also, login again and again whenever they like.

7. Roman to decimal converter

Android Project: This app is aimed at the conversion of Roman numbers to their significant decimal number. It’ll help to check the meaning of the roman numbers. Moreover, it will be easy to develop and will help you get your hands on coding and Android.

You need to use Android Studio, Java for coding and XML for interface. The application will take input from the users and convert them to decimal. Once it converts the Roman no. into decimal, it will show the results on the screen.

The users are supposed to just enter the Roman Number and they’ll get the decimal values on the screen. This can be a good android project for final year students.

8. Virtual Dice Roller

Android Project: Well, coming to this part that is Virtual Dice or a random no. generator. It is another simple but interesting app for computer science students. The only task that it would need to do would be to generate a number randomly. This can help people who’re often confused between two or more things.

Using a simple random number generator you can actually create something as good as this. All you’d need to do is get you hands-on OnClick listeners. And a good layout would be cherry on the cake.

The user’s task would be to set the range of the numbers and then click on the roll button. And the app will show them a randomly generated number. Isn’t it interesting ? Try soon!

9. A Scientific Calculator App

Android Project: This application is very important for you as a beginner as it will let you use your logical thinking and improve your programming skills. This is a scientific calculator that will help the users to do various calculations at ease.

To make this application you’d need to use Android Studio. Here you’d need to use arithmetic logics for the calculations. The user would need to give input to the application that will be in terms of numbers. After that, the user will give the operator as an input. Then the Application will calculate and generate the result on the user screen.

10. SMS App

Android Project: An SMS app is another easy but effective idea. It will let you send the SMS to various no. just in the same way as you use the default messaging application in your phone. This project will help you with better understanding of SMSManager in Android.

For this application, you would need to implement Java class SMSManager in Android. For the Layout you can use XML or JSON. Implementing SMSManager into the app is an easy task, so you would love this.

The user would be provided with the facility to text to whichever number they wish also, they’d be able to choose the numbers from the contact list. Another thing would be the Textbox, where they’ll enter their message. Once the message is entered they can happily click on the send button.

#android tutorials #android application final year project #android mini projects #android project for beginners #android project ideas #android project ideas for beginners #android projects #android projects for students #android projects with source code #android topics list #intermediate android projects #real-time android projects

ScaleGrid GCP Support Now Available for MySQL, PostgreSQL & Redis™

PALO ALTO, Calif., October 14, 2020 – ScaleGrid, a leading Database-as-a-Service (DBaaS) provider, has just announced the launch of Google Cloud Platform (GCP) hosting through their fully managed DBaaS plans. In addition to their AWS, Azure and DigitalOcean hosting solutions, ScaleGrid will now offer GCP hosting for MySQL, PostgreSQL and Redis™.

Google Cloud Platform is the second most popular cloud provider for open source database hosting according to the 2019 Open Source Database Report. While GCP offers their own database products, such as Cloud SQL which can be used for MySQL or PostgreSQL, many users prefer to leverage the open source databases to avoid cloud vendor lock-in with a single provider.

ScaleGrid GCP plans are fully managed and hosted through the DBaaS provider through their standard Dedicated Hosting plans, but they also offer a unique Bring Your Own Cloud (BYOC) model that allows you to host your databases through your own cloud account. All of ScaleGrid’s cloud solutions include advanced configuration and control options, including full superuser access, custom replica setups, and the ability to leverage any instance type. These are in addition to their automation tools that allow you to deploy, monitor, backup and scale your deployments through a few simple clicks.

“We are seeing increasing demand from our customer base for managed Postgresql, MySQL & Redis solutions on Google Cloud” says Dharshan Rangegowda, CEO and Founder of ScaleGrid. “ScaleGrid DBaaS platform provides customers several unique advantages and we are delighted to bring these options to the GCP platform.”.

To learn more about how ScaleGrid compares to GCP, check out their MySQLPostgreSQL and Redis™ vs. GCP’s database products.

#database #google cloud #mysql #postgresql #redis #scalegrid #cloud provider #gcp #google cloud platform #managed database #mysql #postgresql google cloud #scalegrid gcp