WebAssembly vs JavaScript: Can WASM Beat JavaScript In Benchmark?

Many people think WASM is lightning fast and will eliminate JavaScript eventually. However, there are a few points to consider.

It’s very likely that you’ve at least heard of WebAssembly and therefore you’re here. According to W3C, besides HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, WebAssembly is the fourth language for the web which allows code to run in the browser. This is a pretty huge event for web development because since 1996 (CSS), no language was added to this list. So, at this point, there are 3 significant questions raised.

  • What is WebAssembly and how does it work?
  • Is it really lighting fast as its introduction states?
  • Will it replace JavaScript?

Let’s start with the first question.

What Is WebAssembly?

WebAssembly is a low-level, compiled language that can be run on all major browsers. It is pretty new so its effects are not very obvious on the websites we use daily.

The primary concern of WebAssembly is speed. As you know, JavaScript is an interpreted language that is run on the browser using a JIT (Just In Time Compiler). The major drawback of this approach is that the code is not understandable by the computer until it is compiled at runtime. This slows down the execution process remarkably.

At this moment, WebAssembly comes strongly handy because, unlike JavaScript, WebAssembly is compiled all the way down to the binary codes, and therefore, it is so fast that its runtime speed is incomparable with JavaScript. But the story has not finished yet. There still are some points that should make you want to prefer JavaScript over WebAssembly because of speed concerns, surprisingly.

The other innovation that comes with WebAssembly is the availability of languages such as C, C++, Rust, or TypeScript on the web. Since WebAssembly is very low-level, it is kind of hard to code. Fortunately, there are compilers that compile the languages I mentioned down to WebAssembly. So, you can use your favorite language on the web to develop web applications.

Here is a sum function written in TypeScript. Since we will compile this function to WebAssembly, type definitions should be accordingly (AssemblyScript).

An AssemblyScript function to add two numbers.

#javascript #technology #webassembly

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Buddha Community

WebAssembly vs JavaScript: Can WASM Beat JavaScript In Benchmark?

WebAssembly vs JavaScript: Can WASM Beat JavaScript In Benchmark?

Many people think WASM is lightning fast and will eliminate JavaScript eventually. However, there are a few points to consider.

It’s very likely that you’ve at least heard of WebAssembly and therefore you’re here. According to W3C, besides HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, WebAssembly is the fourth language for the web which allows code to run in the browser. This is a pretty huge event for web development because since 1996 (CSS), no language was added to this list. So, at this point, there are 3 significant questions raised.

  • What is WebAssembly and how does it work?
  • Is it really lighting fast as its introduction states?
  • Will it replace JavaScript?

Let’s start with the first question.

What Is WebAssembly?

WebAssembly is a low-level, compiled language that can be run on all major browsers. It is pretty new so its effects are not very obvious on the websites we use daily.

The primary concern of WebAssembly is speed. As you know, JavaScript is an interpreted language that is run on the browser using a JIT (Just In Time Compiler). The major drawback of this approach is that the code is not understandable by the computer until it is compiled at runtime. This slows down the execution process remarkably.

At this moment, WebAssembly comes strongly handy because, unlike JavaScript, WebAssembly is compiled all the way down to the binary codes, and therefore, it is so fast that its runtime speed is incomparable with JavaScript. But the story has not finished yet. There still are some points that should make you want to prefer JavaScript over WebAssembly because of speed concerns, surprisingly.

The other innovation that comes with WebAssembly is the availability of languages such as C, C++, Rust, or TypeScript on the web. Since WebAssembly is very low-level, it is kind of hard to code. Fortunately, there are compilers that compile the languages I mentioned down to WebAssembly. So, you can use your favorite language on the web to develop web applications.

Here is a sum function written in TypeScript. Since we will compile this function to WebAssembly, type definitions should be accordingly (AssemblyScript).

An AssemblyScript function to add two numbers.

#javascript #technology #webassembly

JavaScript vs C++ vs WebAssembly: Speed, Speed, Speed

In Node.js, we can use WebAssembly modules and native C++ addons. If your app has performance critical parts, should you stay in JavaScript? Or write a native C++ addon? Or use WebAssembly? Let’s have a look at how these options compare performance wise and which one is best for different workloads. So the next time you need to optimize for speed, you know your options.

What’s happening under the hood at the compiler level in JavaScript? In this keynote session, Franziska Hinkelmann talks about JavaScript compilers specifically and see how modern JS performance compares to C++ performance. Then, see where WebAssembly fits into this performance story. The concepts that Franziska Hinkelmann will show you are fundamental JS concepts and they apply no matter what framework you are using – so doesn’t matter if you are using Angular, Node.js or anything else.

Moreover, as we go through this journey, the questions like how can dynamically typed JS be so fast, when it became faster than before will be answered as well.

Franziska Hinkelmann spoke at CovalenceConf 2019 about how JavaScript stacks up against C++ and WebAssembly, what kind of code is actually fast, and the performance considerations one should account for when building apps with web technologies.

#javascript #cplusplus #webassembly #cpp #wasm #programming

Samanta  Moore

Samanta Moore

1624959720

Java Vs. JavaScript: Know the Difference

What a mess it could be to share the same name — especially if you are a programming language. Even if you are already over 20 years old, IT newbies periodically confuse you with your namesake. This happens all the time with Java and JavaScript, although they are not related at all! As someone on the internet said. They correlate in much the same way as a car and a carpet.

Why do these two languages have such similar names? How do they differ from each other, and what else do they have in common? This article will provide the answers to these questions.

In the Beginning, It Was Java

The Same Year, A Little Bit Later: Meet JavaScript!

Technical Differences Between Java and JavaScript

What Can You Build in Java and JavaScript?

#java #javascript #javascript-development #java-development #learn-to-code-java #learn-javascript #programming #java-vs-javascript

Jeremy  Reilly

Jeremy Reilly

1600923300

Running Go in the Browser with WASM and Web Workers

We’ve recently made big changes to how we execute Go in the browser on Qvault and want to explain the enhancements. Web Workers are the reason we’ve been able to solve some of the serious browser-related coding problems that were holding us back. Consider this article a sequel to Running Go in the Browser with Web Assembly.

While publishing our latest course, Big-O Algorithms, we needed a way to print console output while code is still executing. We ran into a problem when running computationally expensive algorithms in the browser; the browser gets so bogged down that it can’t render new lines of output. We decided to implement web workers, and they solved the problem handily.

The Problem

In the old Qvault, console output was all printed at once. The program executed, then the output was displayed. We found this to be less than ideal because it is often useful to see when something prints, especially when trying to optimize an algorithm for speed.

For example, this code used to print all of its output at once:

package main

import (
	"fmt"
)

func main(){
	const max = 100000000
	for i := 0; i < max; i++{
		if i % (max/10) == 0{
			fmt.Println(i)
		}
	}
}

Since adding Web Workers, now it appropriately prints each number at the time of execution. You can see for yourself on the playground here.

What Is a Web Worker?

Web Workers are a simple means for web content to run scripts in background threads.

Mozilla

In other words, its a way for us to finally break free from the single-threaded clutches of JavaScript! We can offload expensive tasks to another thread of execution. Doing this leaves the browser free to render updates on the screen.

#golang #javascript #languages #wasm #frontend #go #javascript #wasm #web worker

Mahipal Nehra

Mahipal Nehra

1584529038

Java vs. JavaScript: Know The Difference

Java vs. JavaScript

#java #javascript #Java vs. JavaScript #Java vs JavaScript #programming