Nancy Addision

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909 413 0027 : My cash app is temporarily locked, How to fix it?

Cash app is the most popular American application for money transfers. You can transfer money instantly to anyone by using your contact number. You can also transfer funds using an email address or #cashtag. However, most users find it easier to use contact numbers. People also have multiple problems with their cash app accounts. The Cash App account locked or cash app account closed is one of the most common problems we all face with our accounts.

 

You are here because you want to know how to unlock your cash app account if your account is locked. This blog will provide all the information you need to recover your cash app account. First, we’ll discuss the reasons behind a locked account.

Unlawful activity is the main reason your cash app account is locked. These transactions are often restricted to the cash app. It doesn’t matter if it is knowingly or not, but it can directly impact the credibility and legitimacy of the account.

 

Cash app policies prohibit you from making a prohibited transaction. The cash app immediately blocks all illegal transactions. Your account will be immediately locked if you make such a transaction.
The cash app will also suspend merchant accounts if they have held funds from customers for longer than 30 days.

Multiple incorrect passwords can also cause locked accounts. This was temporary, and you will need to verify your identity to regain access to your account.

 

Why would cash app close my account?



None of the reasons listed above are intentional. Customers may request to lock their accounts to prevent further transactions. If someone hacks their case app account, this is the situation. The first and most immediate action a user can take in this situation is to block. The cash app keeps track of all transactions and other activities that occur on the app. They have the right to lock an account if they discover anything that is not in the policy box.
 

Cash App locked my account due to suspicious activity

 

Are you having issues accessing your Cash App account via mobile app? Maybe your Cash App account is locked. When such a situation arises, you will receive a message stating the reasons why Cash App locked your account. You must know there are certain terms of services of the Cash App which all the users must adhere to. Suppose you violate these terms of services then the Cash App account is locked with money. Apart from this certain activities can seem suspicious to the Cash App, you must indulge in such activities. 

 

Here are some reasons why Cash App locked account due to suspicious activity:

 

  • When you verify the Cash App account, you must ensure that your documents are original and error-free. If your documents are old and not original, your account could be closed due to forgery and for sharing fake details.
  • The other important fact is the location, the Cash App is so far only available in the US and UK. If you are outside these countries, your Cash App account is likely closed.
  • Your Cash App account locked with money if you make any fraudulent transactions from your account. Always send money to people who are on your contact list.
  • Moreover, if you repeatedly failed to log in, Cash App may shut down your account. Or, it may be a case of imposter attacks.
  • Apart from these read out the complete terms of use and services of the Cash App. Because even unknowingly you can violate the terms of services of the Cash App and which can be a major reason behind the Cash App account being locked.

 

However, whatever the reason, it's best to get in touch with customer support to unlock your Cash App account. Essentially there are several ways to remove a ban from your account if it's been temporarily suspended. In the first instance, log out of previous devices before logging into the Cash App. This is the most common solution. If none of these methods work, you should try contacting customer support. You might even be able to get your account back if you've already attempted to do so.

 

How to unlock a Cash App account?

 

The most obvious way to unlock Cash App account is to utilize this app in the United States. If you are not in these two countries, your account will be locked and you will not be able to use it. And if the Cash App account closed due to a violation, you can contact Cash App’s support team to request an account unlock. No matter Cash App locked my account due to suspicious activity; you can always contact the Cash App’s help desk via Twitter. Once you have been banned, you can’t the app again until you get unblocked.

 

Apart from these, you can avoid the suspension on your Cash App account by always adhering to the terms of services. This is vital in helping you to protect the users. For instance, always share the proper and original ID proofs for your account. When you verify the Cash App account, you will have to share info such as valid photo id proof, such as a passport. If you fail to provide this information or share fake Ids, the company will ban your account.

 

How do I unlock my Cash App Account?



It is important to verify the details. These details can be found in your old Cash App account. You will need to modify the settings. You also have the option of accessing your Cash App account from a new account you’ve created recently. For example, your current account could be linked to another email address or telephone number.

If you cannot access your old account, you can join the existing account to the new account.

  1. First, you will need to register for the Cash App account.
  2. Tap the profile icon at the upper left of the screen. There are many options.
  3. Scroll down, then click on the “Personal” option.
  4. Afterward, enter your email address and contact number to complete the profile field. This process will help you solve the problem of your cash app account being locked.

 

Get help from Cash App support to unlock your Cash App account?

 

To get help from the Cash App customer service, you need to register a valid email id and phone number. Following are the steps you need to take to unlock your Cash App account:

 

  • The first step is to log into Cash App and click on the profile icon. This is located on the right-hand side of your home screen.
  • Tap on "Contact Support" to submit your problem.
  • A representative will reply to you within three to four business days.
  • Make sure to follow the steps in the email to avoid further delays. Then, follow the instructions in the response.

 

To get help from Cash App support, you need to confirm that you are a registered user. You must provide your details, and provide the sign-in code. Then, you must wait for the verification code to arrive. If you still cannot receive it, you can contact Cash App support by phone or email. The representatives will give you a sign-in code or OTP. Once you confirm your identity, the system will reopen your closed account.

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909 413 0027 : My cash app is temporarily locked, How to fix it?

Sam Disuza

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Juliana Heaven

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Alex Colmen

1623751848

What is Cash App and how does Activate My Cash App Card?

Cash App is a smart phone payment app that is advanced through Square. Inc. The payments app permits users to transfer cash to 1 any other. Square Company added square cash for businesses functions for individuals, various companies, business proprietors for sending, receiving money which recognized as $cash tag.

The app allows its users for inquiring for and transferring money from one cash account to any other thru cash app or e-mail. It also allow users to withdraw cash thru its debit visa card called as cash card in ATM or any local bank account.

Cash App recorded approximately 7 million active users are in the month of February 18th in year 2018. In the month of January the app commenced the provider of helping bitcoin trading. It has its cash card that is black in Color. It is used for withdrawing money from ATM or bank account.

The card is customizable and may be used by signing at the Mobile App after which sign will be printed on the app and dispatched to person. Square cash company had added their different username which is known as $cashtag. It enables its users in transferring and requesting cash from unique users through coming into such user name. Cash card may be used everywhere in each online payments and in stores also.

How To Activate Cash App Card

When it involves a dependable money transfer app, the name of the Cash app comes into the limelight. Developed and advertised through Square Inc. it’s miles introduced in the market place with an purpose to cater to financial needs. This provider facilitates the users to transfer funds, receive cash requests, pay app bills, and many more. Most importantly, you may also purchase digital currencies including Bitcoin and invest in the stock market place. Like a bank account, it also offers its registered account holders a debit card (better known as Cash Card). With the help of a Cash app card, you may make payments, withdraw cash, and also do various things. To employ this kind of wonderful card, you want to Activate Cash App Card after you get it.

In the blog below, we’re going to share some essential information about the way to activate your cash app card. Moreover, you may also make yourself aware about additional helpful information about the Cash card. Hence, you want to consult the manual right here and find out a better way to use the Cash card to its fullest.

Easy steps to activate cash app card?

To activate your Cash Card the use of the QR code that arrived with it:
• Click the Cash Card tab to your Cash App home screen
• Click the picture of your Cash Card
• Click Activate Cash Card
• Click OK whilst your Cash App asks to apply your digital camera
• Line your digital camera up with the QR code till it comes into focus

Cash App Card Activation With A QR Code

Upon reception of your cash app card, you may also accept an activation QR code. You will want this code to activate your card, the usage of the following steps:

  1. The first issue is to open up the Cash App to your smart phone. Once you open up the app, click the balance amount on your Cash App screen (top middle of the home screen). If your account balance is $0, tap “Cash & BTC”.
  2. Look for the image of your Cash Card and click on it. A listing of alternatives will pop-up, tap “Scan QR Code”.
  3. When Cash App requests permission to apply your smart phone’s camera, click “OK”. Place your smart phone of the QR code in order that it could be visible immediately via the camera. Once the app procedures the QR code information, your card will be officially activated.

Also Know: Cash App Login

Cash App Card Activation Without A QR Code

Unlike the opposite payment apps, Square Cash App we could the users activate their cash cards through scanning a code. Basically, this technique is referred to as automatic or without a card technique. Why? Because on this technique users do not require to have access to a cash card. What matters most is only a QR code. Moreover, it’s also really well worth noting that a Cash App card constantly comes with an different QR code with the shipping of the brand new coins card. If you have also were given your brand new card, follow these steps to activate your Cash App Visa Debit in Cash App on smart phone.
• Navigate to the Cash App mobile app to your phone.
• Then, the next step is to choose a cash-card icon to be had on the home display from the left corner.
• Further, from the drop down menu choose “Activate cash card” to feature a life to it.
• Now Square Cash App might ask you to grant permission to get right of entry to your smart phone’s camera.
• Allow Cash App to have access to your phone’s digital camera to scan a QR code.
• Now set your smart phone camera’s focus to your QR code and scan it.
• Upon a success scanning a QR code, your cash card will all set ready to spend money.

How to Activate Cash App Card on Phone and Computer?

Undoubtedly, the consistent and rapid development in the banking device has resulted in the major relief to the people who ship and get hold of cash online. However, notwithstanding having superior net era and smart phones, some range of demanding situations nevertheless exist with inside the fee device. To triumph over a vast variety of troubles along with fee failure, slow, and slow cash transfer problem, Cash App by Square may be the first-rate answer. More specifically, a Cash App card can genuinely do wonders on the subject of making fee after shopping. Before the whole thing else, be informed that the cash card is difficulty to the activation system. In order to attract the most advantages, you should learn how to activate Cash App card?

As you’re studying this assisting post, possibilities are excessive which you do not have an concept about how you can activate your Cash App card on Cash App payment app. If so, appearance no further. To help you recognize the step by step system to activate a cash card, I am going to reply a number of the important questions.

In case if any of you isn’t a super fan of reading, they can touch and talk to the Cash App consultant directly. Alternatively, scroll down and keep to study this helping post. To be extra clearer, with the aid of using studying this post, you may learn the 2 simple ways to activate a Cash App Debit Card. So, let’s recover from to the first approach to activate a cash card by scanning a QR code.

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Why is my Cash App Transfer Failed [Solution 2021]?

Why is my Cash App Transfer Failed [Solution 2021]? yes sure you can use this app for online Payment Transfer, Call @+1 (855)698 5775 If you are facing any issues related with cash app transfer then you can contact on this number, If you are having trouble making any transfer on Cash App and your payment fails on Cash App then you need to first check if your Cash App is updated on your mobile or not. If not, then update the app to the latest version to make payments smoothly.Cash App transfers are almost always instantaneous. However, there are occasions when the app throws an exception, asking you to wait a little longer — aka 'Payment Pending. ’ It simply means the transfer has been initiated but cannot be fulfilled instantly

My Cash App Transfer Failed For My Protection

Cash App may fail your transaction to protect you from any fraud. Cash App monitors your account and if any suspicious activity takes place, it fails the transaction for your protection. This happens in order to save you from any scam and lose your money.

### Why would cash APP decline a payment for my protection?

Payments on Cash App with the error “failed for my Protection” may be declined for a few reasons. Some of the most common reasons include: Your bank or card issuer is declining the transaction, Incorrect details and the payment has triggered one of Cash App automated security flags.

How do I enable direct deposit on a cash App?

How do I enable direct deposit on a cash App? After successful activation, the employer will be able to pay your paycheck directly into your Cash App account. Follow these steps. Firstly, open the Cash App and click on the profile icon or Balance tab-present in the updated version of Cash App. After that, now navigate down to get the option “Direct Deposit”.

Relaated articles :- Why is my Cash App direct deposit failed ?

Why Cash App Transfer Failed For My Protection

How to Fix Cash App Payments for my protection? If you’re having trouble sending payment, make sure to check if you have added your correct credit or debit card to the Cash App, the best thing to do is double-check or reach out to your card issuer to confirm that there are no issues. If you’re waiting to receive more than $10,000 via direct deposit, your best bet is to request that the sender split the payment into two parts …

How to Fix Cash App Transfer Failed Earlier?

Cash App transfer failed for your security means that the transaction you are trying to make went unsuccessful. It might be any kind of transfer such as bank transfer, online or offline payment, cash withdrawal at an ATM and sending or receiving money to and from contacts.

### How do I fix my cash APP failed for my protection?

If you have got the Cash app Transfer failed error, then you have the option to raise a dispute for an unapproved transaction since you are a bank account holder. It is your right to dispute the unauthorized deductions made by the App

### How to Fix Cash App Transfer Failed ?

Cash app has witnessed considerable growth, with more than 30 million users. It is widely used in the US in order to make payments or transfer money to family and friends. The platform processes millions and millions of transactions on a daily basis. But this percentage is observed to have a huge drop due to Cash App transfer failed issues. About 10% of the total transactions are failing almost daily due to different reasons.
If you are having a similar sort of problem where the Cash App transaction failed, this article might be a useful one for you. It tells about the causes of the Cash app transfer failed error and mentions a few fixes that work for most of the causes as well. Hence, if you are encountering the same problem, read through this article to find your possible fix.

### Major Causes Behind Cash App Transfer Failed

  1. Improper internet connection
  2. Insufficient account balance
  3. Bank account fraud block
  4. Transaction blocked by Cash App

### How to Fix Cash App Transfer Failed

  1. Check a bank balance
  2. Using other bank accounts or cards
  3. Verifying the bank account details
  4. Contacting Cash app support team
  5. Contacting bank

### Major Causes Behind Cash App Transfer Failed

Although the number of causes behind a Cash app seems to be quite high, some of the key reasons are as mentioned:

Improper internet connection

Since all your transactions take place online, it requires a strong internet connection. Therefore, whenever you encounter a payment failure issue, the first thing is to check for your internet connectivity. For more efficient results, it is always better to connect your device to reliable Wi-Fi, if available.

Insufficient account balance

It happens quite often when users try to make a possible transaction without checking their account balance. If in case you don’t have enough amount in your cash app wallet or bank account, your transaction will fail.

Bank account fraud block

Whether you are having your account with Bank of America, PNC, or wherever, all these banks probably have their own fraud departments. These departments flag certain services as scams/ frauds. And since there are already a lot of scams operated on the Cash app these days, it adds up as a considerable reason for them to block transactions.

Transaction blocked by Cash App

Cash app has now grown into a billion-dollar company with around 30+ million users. Therefore, in order to maintain the security and privacy of its users, the Cash app has strict policies. So, if due to some reason, the application might have flagged the other person’s account as potential scam/ fraud, it might again cause a Cash app transfer failure.
These were some of the possible causes of Cash app transfer failed. However, most times, the following solutions might do a pretty good job of resolving your issues.

How do I fix my cash APP failed for my protection??

Since the whole thing is about transactions, there could be a bunch of other causes behind a failed transfer. These are just some basic fixes that actually work in most of the above-mentioned causes.

Related articles- How To Cash App Direct Deposit Failed ?SOlution | tranter-it

Check a bank balance

If your account balance is low in the case of the Cash app, it will eventually result in a failed transaction. However, to avoid such messages, it is a wise habit to always check your account balance or Cash app wallet balance before making a transfer.

Related article :- What happens when the cash app direct deposit failed? How to fix it?

Using other bank accounts or cards

Another primary reason behind encountering failed transactions is because of using blocked or rejected cards. Cash app often displays this error message basically due to server issues of the bank. To avoid such errors, you can try using a different credit/ debit card or bank account.

Verifying the bank account details

This is a very common mistake done by most users. Entering the wrong bank details will definitely lead to an cash app unsuccessful or failed transfer. Therefore, it is a good practice to be a little extra careful while entering such sensitive data.

Contacting Cash app support team

The Cash app might sometimes block your transactions, or it might flag the other person’s account as possible fraud in rare cases. In such situations, the wisest option is to contact the cash app’s support team and ask for assistance regarding the issue you are facing.

Contacting bank

If the bank itself terminates the transaction, contact your bank and ask for what reason the Cash app transfer failed through their system. They will inform you in case there are any serious issues and also advise the best way to overcome it.

Why is cash App declining my payment for my protection?

Cash App monitors your account for anything that looks out of the ordinary. If a potentially fraudulent payment occurs, we cancel it to prevent you from being charged. When this happens, your funds will instantly be returned to your Cash App balance or linked bank account.

Why does my Cash app keep saying Transfer failed?

Why does my Cash app keep saying Transfer failed?The reason why transfer fail every time can be because of the card which is updated on the account has expired or the details of the card are not correct. So, always you need to make sure that the card which is you are using is not expired and the details are correct.

##What does it mean when a cash app payment failed?

Cash App transfer failed for your security means that the transaction you are trying to make went unsuccessful. It might be any kind of transfer such as bank transfer, online or offline payment, cash withdrawal at ATM and sending or receiving money to and from contacts.

###Conclusion

Cash app has now grown quite popular with millions of users trusting its service. And undoubtedly, the application offers a great platform for easy transfer of money along with its other services. However, a lot of scams have already been reported regarding this application. So, if anyhow you face some sort of trouble and encounter the Cash app transfer failure, these tricks must help you find a way to resolve the problem and make efficient money transfer over the app. Let us know if this article helps you or if we missed out on something.

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Linda Osborn

1624527764

Cash App Transfer Failed, Add Cash, My Protection Issue In 2020

Cash App is a money transfer application that allows users to send or receive money online. Many users prefer the Cash App for payment transfers. It’s the most widely used program for peer-to-peer payment transport. However, users experienced issues of - Cash App transfer failed. It turned into a significant problem as users attempted to solve the errors. Errors were because there were many cases when Cash App servers were down.

Suppose you confront mistakes associated with payment failed on Cash App. If that’s the circumstance, we strongly advise you to read the comprehensive blog; after this, you can fix the payment failed issue on Cash App.

Why the Cash App transfer failed?
We have attempted to describe some of the most typical reasons behind why cash app payment failed for my protection. Following are some of the most frequent reasons a user confronts while transferring payments and which lead this transfer failed on the Cash App:

  • Internet speed and wifi: To utilize Cash App, you need a strong online connection; it will not permit you to make transactions on low –net speed. Therefore, you must always make sure that your web is up and running while creating a Cash App transaction.
  • Square Cash application in your device: There is a chance your cash app transactions are becoming failed since you overlook upgrading your application with a significant upgrade. Check the application version in your device app store because it’s mandated to upgrade the application with the newest updates provided by Cash App.
  • Cash App account verification: Most of the time many of the non-verified users on Cash App confronted the issue of “Cash App this transfer failed.” Hence you should keep you account verified and update the credentials such as complete name, date of birth, address, and social security number.
  • Check Recipient ID and $Cashtag: Always assess the recipient ID correctly before beginning the transaction. Since the Cash App demands the particular user’s precise details, the recipient ID will help identify and bridge the two consumers’ transactions.

Also Read: Cash App Direct Deposit Unemployment || Cash App Tax Refund

How to issue a transfer failed on the Cash App?
Follow a number of the necessary actions that you need to take to fix the payment failed on the Cash App:

  • You should always check whether your Cash App card is working properly because there are many instances when cards expire and are still linked to accounts.
  • Moreover when you transfer money from Cash App make sure to check the account’s balance; it will show on the home display at the very top center of the Cash App on a mobile device.
  • Make sure you enter the right information. If the amount transfers to the wrong address, it would not be possible to obtain the money back.
  • Verify your Cash App account. Verification is critical to continue enjoying the services uninterruptedly.
  • Always make sure there is enough balance on your Cash App.
  • If the user has connected the device to wifi, it must remain 300 feet from the wifi router to get the internet signals.
  • Regularly check for Cash App updates in the app store of your device.
  • Reinstall the program if any problem continues.
  • Assess the time and date; when it’s wrong, try to update your device.
  • Assess for cellular wifi or network link; the device should get an uninterrupted net.

Also Read: Cash App Refund || Cash App Direct Deposit

Cash App failed for my protection- What does it mean? 
Cash App transfer failed in your safety way that the transaction you are attempting to make went unsuccessful. It is probably any sort of transfer consisting of bank transfer, online or offline payment, cash withdrawal at ATM and sending or receiving money to and from contacts. And because the call indicates of this Cash App error, there should were any kind of security related problem because of which your Cash App transfer has failed. Let’s recover from it in detail in the following section.

Why would Cash App cancel a payment for my protection? 
Let’s now no longer neglect about that Cash App is an authorized payment app. Above all, its miles a consumer orientated company. The main cause for Cash App being famous in only a quick time frame lies in its protection features and method to save you the frauds and scam on its platform. Keeping in thoughts the developing threats to cyber security, Cash App has designed its server in a way that it runs all of the time in the historical past in regular search of any suspicious interest. As quickly as any slightest of moderate dubious activity is caught, Cash App’s protective device comes into action and prevents the Cash App payment from going successful.

However, in line with the Cash App experts, once in a while Cash App customers make a few stupid mistakes without understanding that their mistake makes them appear as a suspicious Cash App user. Which further would possibly result in Cash App transfer failure? Scroll right all the way down to discover greater facts about how to fix Cash App transfer failed for your protection.

How do I fix my Cash App payment failed for my protection

  • Let’s now no longer overlook that Cash App is a digital payment app. And every digital service works on the net. In the absence of uninterrupted net service, your Cash App transfers are much more likely to be failed. So, ensure that your smart phone is getting seamless net signals.
  • It is right in case you use Cash App a lot in regular life. But, in case you are doing so without confirming your identity then it is bad. Reportedly, most of the transactions which might be failed on Cash App done by those people who are unverified Cash App customers due to the fact they usually seem like suspicious until they verify their identity on Cash App. So, take a minute to verify your identity on Cash App. It is simple.
  • You are probably aware about VPN. Most probably, you also realize the blessings of the usage of a VPN. But, what a less known fact is that VPN comes with its very own disadvantages. Especially, while its miles used on a payment app. The same is proper with Cash App. A use of VPN with Cash App is probably a matter of real trouble because it hides the location causing Cash App to consider you will do something wrong. That’s why, thoughts to disable VPN even as sending or receiving money through Cash App.*

Also Know: Activate Cash App Card || Cash App Login

Other ways to fix Cash App Transfer failed 
If you suspect there’s not anything suspicious about your Cash App payment but still you can’t send or receive money the use of Cash App then the probabilities are high that you’re violating the Cash App limits. Yes, Cash App comes with a few limits. Anyone who’s a validated Cash App user can ship up to $7500 in a week. Any Cash App transaction or charge main to pass the Cash App restrict will definitely fail. So, make sure that your Cash App account is under the most permissible limit.

Lastly, but most importantly, Cash App mobile app is problem to regular development. For hassle-free experience, you have to hold updating your Cash App utility. Doing so, you can easily keep away from such a lot of errors along with the Cash App transfer failed for my protection.

FAQ’S

Q. Why is my transfer failing on the Cash App?
If your transfer fails on a Cash App, it could be due to so many different reasons; you must have made a mistake while transferring money due to which the transfer failed. The most common mistake users make while sending money from Cash App is using a low-speed internet connection, not updating the application and entering incorrect details.

Q. How do I fix transfer failure on the Cash App?
To fix the transfer failed on Cash App, you need to check whether the internet-connected to your device is working or not. And make sure that you have updated the cash app on your mobile phone. Moreover, always re-check the details such as the amount of money, $Cashtag while transferring money.

Q. What happens when a cash app payment fails?
If the Cash App payment failed, the user has not received the money you were trying to send. The payment failed issue on Cash App takes place due to so many different reasons.

Q. Why does the Cash app keep declining my payment?
Cash App keeps declining your payment if you have not verified your Cash App account, and your bank is not responding to the Cash App server; hence, the payment is declined by the Cash App. Moreover, if there is any internet or wifi connection errors, transactions are declined by the Cash App.

Q. Why does a Cash App get failed for my protection?
If there is any suspicious activity or fraudulent transactions on your Cash App account, then Cash App cancels this payment for your protection. Therefore, this Cash App payment fails your protection to save you from being overcharged and avoid unnecessary scams.

Bottom Lines:-

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#cash app transfer failed #cash app payment failed #cash app payment failed for my protection #cash app transfer declined by bank #cash app transfer declined #cash app transfer pending

Rufus Scheduler: Job Scheduler for Ruby (at, Cron, in and Every Jobs)

rufus-scheduler

Job scheduler for Ruby (at, cron, in and every jobs).

It uses threads.

Note: maybe are you looking for the README of rufus-scheduler 2.x? (especially if you're using Dashing which is stuck on rufus-scheduler 2.0.24)

Quickstart:

# quickstart.rb

require 'rufus-scheduler'

scheduler = Rufus::Scheduler.new

scheduler.in '3s' do
  puts 'Hello... Rufus'
end

scheduler.join
  #
  # let the current thread join the scheduler thread
  #
  # (please note that this join should be removed when scheduling
  # in a web application (Rails and friends) initializer)

(run with ruby quickstart.rb)

Various forms of scheduling are supported:

require 'rufus-scheduler'

scheduler = Rufus::Scheduler.new

# ...

scheduler.in '10d' do
  # do something in 10 days
end

scheduler.at '2030/12/12 23:30:00' do
  # do something at a given point in time
end

scheduler.every '3h' do
  # do something every 3 hours
end
scheduler.every '3h10m' do
  # do something every 3 hours and 10 minutes
end

scheduler.cron '5 0 * * *' do
  # do something every day, five minutes after midnight
  # (see "man 5 crontab" in your terminal)
end

# ...

Rufus-scheduler uses fugit for parsing time strings, et-orbi for pairing time and tzinfo timezones.

non-features

Rufus-scheduler (out of the box) is an in-process, in-memory scheduler. It uses threads.

It does not persist your schedules. When the process is gone and the scheduler instance with it, the schedules are gone.

A rufus-scheduler instance will go on scheduling while it is present among the objects in a Ruby process. To make it stop scheduling you have to call its #shutdown method.

related and similar gems

  • Whenever - let cron call back your Ruby code, trusted and reliable cron drives your schedule
  • ruby-clock - a clock process / job scheduler for Ruby
  • Clockwork - rufus-scheduler inspired gem
  • Crono - an in-Rails cron scheduler
  • PerfectSched - highly available distributed cron built on Sequel and more

(please note: rufus-scheduler is not a cron replacement)

note about the 3.0 line

It's a complete rewrite of rufus-scheduler.

There is no EventMachine-based scheduler anymore.

I don't know what this Ruby thing is, where are my Rails?

I'll drive you right to the tracks.

notable changes:

  • As said, no more EventMachine-based scheduler
  • scheduler.every('100') { will schedule every 100 seconds (previously, it would have been 0.1s). This aligns rufus-scheduler with Ruby's sleep(100)
  • The scheduler isn't catching the whole of Exception anymore, only StandardError
  • The error_handler is #on_error (instead of #on_exception), by default it now prints the details of the error to $stderr (used to be $stdout)
  • Rufus::Scheduler::TimeOutError renamed to Rufus::Scheduler::TimeoutError
  • Introduction of "interval" jobs. Whereas "every" jobs are like "every 10 minutes, do this", interval jobs are like "do that, then wait for 10 minutes, then do that again, and so on"
  • Introduction of a lockfile: true/filename mechanism to prevent multiple schedulers from executing
  • "discard_past" is on by default. If the scheduler (its host) sleeps for 1 hour and a every '10m' job is on, it will trigger once at wakeup, not 6 times (discard_past was false by default in rufus-scheduler 2.x). No intention to re-introduce discard_past: false in 3.0 for now.
  • Introduction of Scheduler #on_pre_trigger and #on_post_trigger callback points

getting help

So you need help. People can help you, but first help them help you, and don't waste their time. Provide a complete description of the issue. If it works on A but not on B and others have to ask you: "so what is different between A and B" you are wasting everyone's time.

"hello", "please" and "thanks" are not swear words.

Go read how to report bugs effectively, twice.

Update: help_help.md might help help you.

on Gitter

You can find help via chat over at https://gitter.im/floraison/fugit. It's fugit, et-orbi, and rufus-scheduler combined chat room.

Please be courteous.

issues

Yes, issues can be reported in rufus-scheduler issues, I'd actually prefer bugs in there. If there is nothing wrong with rufus-scheduler, a Stack Overflow question is better.

faq

scheduling

Rufus-scheduler supports five kinds of jobs. in, at, every, interval and cron jobs.

Most of the rufus-scheduler examples show block scheduling, but it's also OK to schedule handler instances or handler classes.

in, at, every, interval, cron

In and at jobs trigger once.

require 'rufus-scheduler'

scheduler = Rufus::Scheduler.new

scheduler.in '10d' do
  puts "10 days reminder for review X!"
end

scheduler.at '2014/12/24 2000' do
  puts "merry xmas!"
end

In jobs are scheduled with a time interval, they trigger after that time elapsed. At jobs are scheduled with a point in time, they trigger when that point in time is reached (better to choose a point in the future).

Every, interval and cron jobs trigger repeatedly.

require 'rufus-scheduler'

scheduler = Rufus::Scheduler.new

scheduler.every '3h' do
  puts "change the oil filter!"
end

scheduler.interval '2h' do
  puts "thinking..."
  puts sleep(rand * 1000)
  puts "thought."
end

scheduler.cron '00 09 * * *' do
  puts "it's 9am! good morning!"
end

Every jobs try hard to trigger following the frequency they were scheduled with.

Interval jobs trigger, execute and then trigger again after the interval elapsed. (every jobs time between trigger times, interval jobs time between trigger termination and the next trigger start).

Cron jobs are based on the venerable cron utility (man 5 crontab). They trigger following a pattern given in (almost) the same language cron uses.

 

#schedule_x vs #x

schedule_in, schedule_at, schedule_cron, etc will return the new Job instance.

in, at, cron will return the new Job instance's id (a String).

job_id =
  scheduler.in '10d' do
    # ...
  end
job = scheduler.job(job_id)

# versus

job =
  scheduler.schedule_in '10d' do
    # ...
  end

# also

job =
  scheduler.in '10d', job: true do
    # ...
  end

#schedule and #repeat

Sometimes it pays to be less verbose.

The #schedule methods schedules an at, in or cron job. It just decides based on its input. It returns the Job instance.

scheduler.schedule '10d' do; end.class
  # => Rufus::Scheduler::InJob

scheduler.schedule '2013/12/12 12:30' do; end.class
  # => Rufus::Scheduler::AtJob

scheduler.schedule '* * * * *' do; end.class
  # => Rufus::Scheduler::CronJob

The #repeat method schedules and returns an EveryJob or a CronJob.

scheduler.repeat '10d' do; end.class
  # => Rufus::Scheduler::EveryJob

scheduler.repeat '* * * * *' do; end.class
  # => Rufus::Scheduler::CronJob

(Yes, no combination here gives back an IntervalJob).

schedule blocks arguments (job, time)

A schedule block may be given 0, 1 or 2 arguments.

The first argument is "job", it's simply the Job instance involved. It might be useful if the job is to be unscheduled for some reason.

scheduler.every '10m' do |job|

  status = determine_pie_status

  if status == 'burnt' || status == 'cooked'
    stop_oven
    takeout_pie
    job.unschedule
  end
end

The second argument is "time", it's the time when the job got cleared for triggering (not Time.now).

Note that time is the time when the job got cleared for triggering. If there are mutexes involved, now = mutex_wait_time + time...

"every" jobs and changing the next_time in-flight

It's OK to change the next_time of an every job in-flight:

scheduler.every '10m' do |job|

  # ...

  status = determine_pie_status

  job.next_time = Time.now + 30 * 60 if status == 'burnt'
    #
    # if burnt, wait 30 minutes for the oven to cool a bit
end

It should work as well with cron jobs, not so with interval jobs whose next_time is computed after their block ends its current run.

scheduling handler instances

It's OK to pass any object, as long as it responds to #call(), when scheduling:

class Handler
  def self.call(job, time)
    p "- Handler called for #{job.id} at #{time}"
  end
end

scheduler.in '10d', Handler

# or

class OtherHandler
  def initialize(name)
    @name = name
  end
  def call(job, time)
    p "* #{time} - Handler #{name.inspect} called for #{job.id}"
  end
end

oh = OtherHandler.new('Doe')

scheduler.every '10m', oh
scheduler.in '3d5m', oh

The call method must accept 2 (job, time), 1 (job) or 0 arguments.

Note that time is the time when the job got cleared for triggering. If there are mutexes involved, now = mutex_wait_time + time...

scheduling handler classes

One can pass a handler class to rufus-scheduler when scheduling. Rufus will instantiate it and that instance will be available via job#handler.

class MyHandler
  attr_reader :count
  def initialize
    @count = 0
  end
  def call(job)
    @count += 1
    puts ". #{self.class} called at #{Time.now} (#{@count})"
  end
end

job = scheduler.schedule_every '35m', MyHandler

job.handler
  # => #<MyHandler:0x000000021034f0>
job.handler.count
  # => 0

If you want to keep that "block feeling":

job_id =
  scheduler.every '10m', Class.new do
    def call(job)
      puts ". hello #{self.inspect} at #{Time.now}"
    end
  end

pause and resume the scheduler

The scheduler can be paused via the #pause and #resume methods. One can determine if the scheduler is currently paused by calling #paused?.

While paused, the scheduler still accepts schedules, but no schedule will get triggered as long as #resume isn't called.

job options

name: string

Sets the name of the job.

scheduler.cron '*/15 8 * * *', name: 'Robert' do |job|
  puts "A, it's #{Time.now} and my name is #{job.name}"
end

job1 =
  scheduler.schedule_cron '*/30 9 * * *', n: 'temporary' do |job|
    puts "B, it's #{Time.now} and my name is #{job.name}"
  end
# ...
job1.name = 'Beowulf'

blocking: true

By default, jobs are triggered in their own, new threads. When blocking: true, the job is triggered in the scheduler thread (a new thread is not created). Yes, while a blocking job is running, the scheduler is not scheduling.

overlap: false

Since, by default, jobs are triggered in their own new threads, job instances might overlap. For example, a job that takes 10 minutes and is scheduled every 7 minutes will have overlaps.

To prevent overlap, one can set overlap: false. Such a job will not trigger if one of its instances is already running.

The :overlap option is considered before the :mutex option when the scheduler is reviewing jobs for triggering.

mutex: mutex_instance / mutex_name / array of mutexes

When a job with a mutex triggers, the job's block is executed with the mutex around it, preventing other jobs with the same mutex from entering (it makes the other jobs wait until it exits the mutex).

This is different from overlap: false, which is, first, limited to instances of the same job, and, second, doesn't make the incoming job instance block/wait but give up.

:mutex accepts a mutex instance or a mutex name (String). It also accept an array of mutex names / mutex instances. It allows for complex relations between jobs.

Array of mutexes: original idea and implementation by Rainux Luo

Note: creating lots of different mutexes is OK. Rufus-scheduler will place them in its Scheduler#mutexes hash... And they won't get garbage collected.

The :overlap option is considered before the :mutex option when the scheduler is reviewing jobs for triggering.

timeout: duration or point in time

It's OK to specify a timeout when scheduling some work. After the time specified, it gets interrupted via a Rufus::Scheduler::TimeoutError.

scheduler.in '10d', timeout: '1d' do
  begin
    # ... do something
  rescue Rufus::Scheduler::TimeoutError
    # ... that something got interrupted after 1 day
  end
end

The :timeout option accepts either a duration (like "1d" or "2w3d") or a point in time (like "2013/12/12 12:00").

:first_at, :first_in, :first, :first_time

This option is for repeat jobs (cron / every) only.

It's used to specify the first time after which the repeat job should trigger for the first time.

In the case of an "every" job, this will be the first time (modulo the scheduler frequency) the job triggers. For a "cron" job as well, the :first will point to the first time the job has to trigger, the following trigger times are then determined by the cron string.

scheduler.every '2d', first_at: Time.now + 10 * 3600 do
  # ... every two days, but start in 10 hours
end

scheduler.every '2d', first_in: '10h' do
  # ... every two days, but start in 10 hours
end

scheduler.cron '00 14 * * *', first_in: '3d' do
  # ... every day at 14h00, but start after 3 * 24 hours
end

:first, :first_at and :first_in all accept a point in time or a duration (number or time string). Use the symbol you think makes your schedule more readable.

Note: it's OK to change the first_at (a Time instance) directly:

job.first_at = Time.now + 10
job.first_at = Rufus::Scheduler.parse('2029-12-12')

The first argument (in all its flavours) accepts a :now or :immediately value. That schedules the first occurrence for immediate triggering. Consider:

require 'rufus-scheduler'

s = Rufus::Scheduler.new

n = Time.now; p [ :scheduled_at, n, n.to_f ]

s.every '3s', first: :now do
  n = Time.now; p [ :in, n, n.to_f ]
end

s.join

that'll output something like:

[:scheduled_at, 2014-01-22 22:21:21 +0900, 1390396881.344438]
[:in, 2014-01-22 22:21:21 +0900, 1390396881.6453865]
[:in, 2014-01-22 22:21:24 +0900, 1390396884.648807]
[:in, 2014-01-22 22:21:27 +0900, 1390396887.651686]
[:in, 2014-01-22 22:21:30 +0900, 1390396890.6571937]
...

:last_at, :last_in, :last

This option is for repeat jobs (cron / every) only.

It indicates the point in time after which the job should unschedule itself.

scheduler.cron '5 23 * * *', last_in: '10d' do
  # ... do something every evening at 23:05 for 10 days
end

scheduler.every '10m', last_at: Time.now + 10 * 3600 do
  # ... do something every 10 minutes for 10 hours
end

scheduler.every '10m', last_in: 10 * 3600 do
  # ... do something every 10 minutes for 10 hours
end

:last, :last_at and :last_in all accept a point in time or a duration (number or time string). Use the symbol you think makes your schedule more readable.

Note: it's OK to change the last_at (nil or a Time instance) directly:

job.last_at = nil
  # remove the "last" bound

job.last_at = Rufus::Scheduler.parse('2029-12-12')
  # set the last bound

times: nb of times (before auto-unscheduling)

One can tell how many times a repeat job (CronJob or EveryJob) is to execute before unscheduling by itself.

scheduler.every '2d', times: 10 do
  # ... do something every two days, but not more than 10 times
end

scheduler.cron '0 23 * * *', times: 31 do
  # ... do something every day at 23:00 but do it no more than 31 times
end

It's OK to assign nil to :times to make sure the repeat job is not limited. It's useful when the :times is determined at scheduling time.

scheduler.cron '0 23 * * *', times: (nolimit ? nil : 10) do
  # ...
end

The value set by :times is accessible in the job. It can be modified anytime.

job =
  scheduler.cron '0 23 * * *' do
    # ...
  end

# later on...

job.times = 10
  # 10 days and it will be over

Job methods

When calling a schedule method, the id (String) of the job is returned. Longer schedule methods return Job instances directly. Calling the shorter schedule methods with the job: true also returns Job instances instead of Job ids (Strings).

  require 'rufus-scheduler'

  scheduler = Rufus::Scheduler.new

  job_id =
    scheduler.in '10d' do
      # ...
    end

  job =
    scheduler.schedule_in '1w' do
      # ...
    end

  job =
    scheduler.in '1w', job: true do
      # ...
    end

Those Job instances have a few interesting methods / properties:

id, job_id

Returns the job id.

job = scheduler.schedule_in('10d') do; end
job.id
  # => "in_1374072446.8923042_0.0_0"

scheduler

Returns the scheduler instance itself.

opts

Returns the options passed at the Job creation.

job = scheduler.schedule_in('10d', tag: 'hello') do; end
job.opts
  # => { :tag => 'hello' }

original

Returns the original schedule.

job = scheduler.schedule_in('10d', tag: 'hello') do; end
job.original
  # => '10d'

callable, handler

callable() returns the scheduled block (or the call method of the callable object passed in lieu of a block)

handler() returns nil if a block was scheduled and the instance scheduled otherwise.

# when passing a block

job =
  scheduler.schedule_in('10d') do
    # ...
  end

job.handler
  # => nil
job.callable
  # => #<Proc:0x00000001dc6f58@/home/jmettraux/whatever.rb:115>

and

# when passing something else than a block

class MyHandler
  attr_reader :counter
  def initialize
    @counter = 0
  end
  def call(job, time)
    @counter = @counter + 1
  end
end

job = scheduler.schedule_in('10d', MyHandler.new)

job.handler
  # => #<Method: MyHandler#call>
job.callable
  # => #<MyHandler:0x0000000163ae88 @counter=0>

source_location

Added to rufus-scheduler 3.8.0.

Returns the array [ 'path/to/file.rb', 123 ] like Proc#source_location does.

require 'rufus-scheduler'

scheduler = Rufus::Scheduler.new

job = scheduler.schedule_every('2h') { p Time.now }

p job.source_location
  # ==> [ '/home/jmettraux/rufus-scheduler/test.rb', 6 ]

scheduled_at

Returns the Time instance when the job got created.

job = scheduler.schedule_in('10d', tag: 'hello') do; end
job.scheduled_at
  # => 2013-07-17 23:48:54 +0900

last_time

Returns the last time the job triggered (is usually nil for AtJob and InJob).

job = scheduler.schedule_every('10s') do; end

job.scheduled_at
  # => 2013-07-17 23:48:54 +0900
job.last_time
  # => nil (since we've just scheduled it)

# after 10 seconds

job.scheduled_at
  # => 2013-07-17 23:48:54 +0900 (same as above)
job.last_time
  # => 2013-07-17 23:49:04 +0900

previous_time

Returns the previous #next_time

scheduler.every('10s') do |job|
  puts "job scheduled for #{job.previous_time} triggered at #{Time.now}"
  puts "next time will be around #{job.next_time}"
  puts "."
end

last_work_time, mean_work_time

The job keeps track of how long its work was in the last_work_time attribute. For a one time job (in, at) it's probably not very useful.

The attribute mean_work_time contains a computed mean work time. It's recomputed after every run (if it's a repeat job).

next_times(n)

Returns an array of EtOrbi::EoTime instances (Time instances with a designated time zone), listing the n next occurrences for this job.

Please note that for "interval" jobs, a mean work time is computed each time and it's used by this #next_times(n) method to approximate the next times beyond the immediate next time.

unschedule

Unschedule the job, preventing it from firing again and removing it from the schedule. This doesn't prevent a running thread for this job to run until its end.

threads

Returns the list of threads currently "hosting" runs of this Job instance.

kill

Interrupts all the work threads currently running for this job instance. They discard their work and are free for their next run (of whatever job).

Note: this doesn't unschedule the Job instance.

Note: if the job is pooled for another run, a free work thread will probably pick up that next run and the job will appear as running again. You'd have to unschedule and kill to make sure the job doesn't run again.

running?

Returns true if there is at least one running Thread hosting a run of this Job instance.

scheduled?

Returns true if the job is scheduled (is due to trigger). For repeat jobs it should return true until the job gets unscheduled. "at" and "in" jobs will respond with false as soon as they start running (execution triggered).

pause, resume, paused?, paused_at

These four methods are only available to CronJob, EveryJob and IntervalJob instances. One can pause or resume such jobs thanks to these methods.

job =
  scheduler.schedule_every('10s') do
    # ...
  end

job.pause
  # => 2013-07-20 01:22:22 +0900
job.paused?
  # => true
job.paused_at
  # => 2013-07-20 01:22:22 +0900

job.resume
  # => nil

tags

Returns the list of tags attached to this Job instance.

By default, returns an empty array.

job = scheduler.schedule_in('10d') do; end
job.tags
  # => []

job = scheduler.schedule_in('10d', tag: 'hello') do; end
job.tags
  # => [ 'hello' ]

[]=, [], key?, has_key?, keys, values, and entries

Threads have thread-local variables, similarly Rufus-scheduler jobs have job-local variables. Those are more like a dict with thread-safe access.

job =
  @scheduler.schedule_every '1s' do |job|
    job[:timestamp] = Time.now.to_f
    job[:counter] ||= 0
    job[:counter] += 1
  end

sleep 3.6

job[:counter]
  # => 3

job.key?(:timestamp) # => true
job.has_key?(:timestamp) # => true
job.keys # => [ :timestamp, :counter ]

Locals can be set at schedule time:

job0 =
  @scheduler.schedule_cron '*/15 12 * * *', locals: { a: 0 } do
    # ...
  end
job1 =
  @scheduler.schedule_cron '*/15 13 * * *', l: { a: 1 } do
    # ...
  end

One can fetch the Hash directly with Job#locals. Of course, direct manipulation is not thread-safe.

job.locals.entries do |k, v|
  p "#{k}: #{v}"
end

call

Job instances have a #call method. It simply calls the scheduled block or callable immediately.

job =
  @scheduler.schedule_every '10m' do |job|
    # ...
  end

job.call

Warning: the Scheduler#on_error handler is not involved. Error handling is the responsibility of the caller.

If the call has to be rescued by the error handler of the scheduler, call(true) might help:

require 'rufus-scheduler'

s = Rufus::Scheduler.new

def s.on_error(job, err)
  if job
    p [ 'error in scheduled job', job.class, job.original, err.message ]
  else
    p [ 'error while scheduling', err.message ]
  end
rescue
  p $!
end

job =
  s.schedule_in('1d') do
    fail 'again'
  end

job.call(true)
  #
  # true lets the error_handler deal with error in the job call

AtJob and InJob methods

time

Returns when the job will trigger (hopefully).

next_time

An alias for time.

EveryJob, IntervalJob and CronJob methods

next_time

Returns the next time the job will trigger (hopefully).

count

Returns how many times the job fired.

EveryJob methods

frequency

It returns the scheduling frequency. For a job scheduled "every 20s", it's 20.

It's used to determine if the job frequency is higher than the scheduler frequency (it raises an ArgumentError if that is the case).

IntervalJob methods

interval

Returns the interval scheduled between each execution of the job.

Every jobs use a time duration between each start of their execution, while interval jobs use a time duration between the end of an execution and the start of the next.

CronJob methods

brute_frequency

An expensive method to run, it's brute. It caches its results. By default it runs for 2017 (a non leap-year).

  require 'rufus-scheduler'

  Rufus::Scheduler.parse('* * * * *').brute_frequency
    #
    # => #<Fugit::Cron::Frequency:0x00007fdf4520c5e8
    #      @span=31536000.0, @delta_min=60, @delta_max=60,
    #      @occurrences=525600, @span_years=1.0, @yearly_occurrences=525600.0>
      #
      # Occurs 525600 times in a span of 1 year (2017) and 1 day.
      # There are least 60 seconds between "triggers" and at most 60 seconds.

  Rufus::Scheduler.parse('0 12 * * *').brute_frequency
    # => #<Fugit::Cron::Frequency:0x00007fdf451ec6d0
    #      @span=31536000.0, @delta_min=86400, @delta_max=86400,
    #      @occurrences=365, @span_years=1.0, @yearly_occurrences=365.0>
  Rufus::Scheduler.parse('0 12 * * *').brute_frequency.to_debug_s
    # => "dmin: 1D, dmax: 1D, ocs: 365, spn: 52W1D, spnys: 1, yocs: 365"
      #
      # 365 occurrences, at most 1 day between each, at least 1 day.

The CronJob#frequency method found in rufus-scheduler < 3.5 has been retired.

looking up jobs

Scheduler#job(job_id)

The scheduler #job(job_id) method can be used to look up Job instances.

  require 'rufus-scheduler'

  scheduler = Rufus::Scheduler.new

  job_id =
    scheduler.in '10d' do
      # ...
    end

  # later on...

  job = scheduler.job(job_id)

Scheduler #jobs #at_jobs #in_jobs #every_jobs #interval_jobs and #cron_jobs

Are methods for looking up lists of scheduled Job instances.

Here is an example:

  #
  # let's unschedule all the at jobs

  scheduler.at_jobs.each(&:unschedule)

Scheduler#jobs(tag: / tags: x)

When scheduling a job, one can specify one or more tags attached to the job. These can be used to look up the job later on.

  scheduler.in '10d', tag: 'main_process' do
    # ...
  end
  scheduler.in '10d', tags: [ 'main_process', 'side_dish' ] do
    # ...
  end

  # ...

  jobs = scheduler.jobs(tag: 'main_process')
    # find all the jobs with the 'main_process' tag

  jobs = scheduler.jobs(tags: [ 'main_process', 'side_dish' ]
    # find all the jobs with the 'main_process' AND 'side_dish' tags

Scheduler#running_jobs

Returns the list of Job instance that have currently running instances.

Whereas other "_jobs" method scan the scheduled job list, this method scans the thread list to find the job. It thus comprises jobs that are running but are not scheduled anymore (that happens for at and in jobs).

misc Scheduler methods

Scheduler#unschedule(job_or_job_id)

Unschedule a job given directly or by its id.

Scheduler#shutdown

Shuts down the scheduler, ceases any scheduler/triggering activity.

Scheduler#shutdown(:wait)

Shuts down the scheduler, waits (blocks) until all the jobs cease running.

Scheduler#shutdown(wait: n)

Shuts down the scheduler, waits (blocks) at most n seconds until all the jobs cease running. (Jobs are killed after n seconds have elapsed).

Scheduler#shutdown(:kill)

Kills all the job (threads) and then shuts the scheduler down. Radical.

Scheduler#down?

Returns true if the scheduler has been shut down.

Scheduler#started_at

Returns the Time instance at which the scheduler got started.

Scheduler #uptime / #uptime_s

Returns since the count of seconds for which the scheduler has been running.

#uptime_s returns this count in a String easier to grasp for humans, like "3d12m45s123".

Scheduler#join

Lets the current thread join the scheduling thread in rufus-scheduler. The thread comes back when the scheduler gets shut down.

#join is mostly used in standalone scheduling script (or tiny one file examples). Calling #join from a web application initializer will probably hijack the main thread and prevent the web application from being served. Do not put a #join in such a web application initializer file.

Scheduler#threads

Returns all the threads associated with the scheduler, including the scheduler thread itself.

Scheduler#work_threads(query=:all/:active/:vacant)

Lists the work threads associated with the scheduler. The query option defaults to :all.

  • :all : all the work threads
  • :active : all the work threads currently running a Job
  • :vacant : all the work threads currently not running a Job

Note that the main schedule thread will be returned if it is currently running a Job (ie one of those blocking: true jobs).

Scheduler#scheduled?(job_or_job_id)

Returns true if the arg is a currently scheduled job (see Job#scheduled?).

Scheduler#occurrences(time0, time1)

Returns a hash { job => [ t0, t1, ... ] } mapping jobs to their potential trigger time within the [ time0, time1 ] span.

Please note that, for interval jobs, the #mean_work_time is used, so the result is only a prediction.

Scheduler#timeline(time0, time1)

Like #occurrences but returns a list [ [ t0, job0 ], [ t1, job1 ], ... ] of time + job pairs.

dealing with job errors

The easy, job-granular way of dealing with errors is to rescue and deal with them immediately. The two next sections show examples. Skip them for explanations on how to deal with errors at the scheduler level.

block jobs

As said, jobs could take care of their errors themselves.

scheduler.every '10m' do
  begin
    # do something that might fail...
  rescue => e
    $stderr.puts '-' * 80
    $stderr.puts e.message
    $stderr.puts e.stacktrace
    $stderr.puts '-' * 80
  end
end

callable jobs

Jobs are not only shrunk to blocks, here is how the above would look like with a dedicated class.

scheduler.every '10m', Class.new do
  def call(job)
    # do something that might fail...
  rescue => e
    $stderr.puts '-' * 80
    $stderr.puts e.message
    $stderr.puts e.stacktrace
    $stderr.puts '-' * 80
  end
end

TODO: talk about callable#on_error (if implemented)

(see scheduling handler instances and scheduling handler classes for more about those "callable jobs")

Rufus::Scheduler#stderr=

By default, rufus-scheduler intercepts all errors (that inherit from StandardError) and dumps abundant details to $stderr.

If, for example, you'd like to divert that flow to another file (descriptor), you can reassign $stderr for the current Ruby process

$stderr = File.open('/var/log/myapplication.log', 'ab')

or, you can limit that reassignement to the scheduler itself

scheduler.stderr = File.open('/var/log/myapplication.log', 'ab')

Rufus::Scheduler#on_error(job, error)

We've just seen that, by default, rufus-scheduler dumps error information to $stderr. If one needs to completely change what happens in case of error, it's OK to overwrite #on_error

def scheduler.on_error(job, error)

  Logger.warn("intercepted error in #{job.id}: #{error.message}")
end

On Rails, the on_error method redefinition might look like:

def scheduler.on_error(job, error)

  Rails.logger.error(
    "err#{error.object_id} rufus-scheduler intercepted #{error.inspect}" +
    " in job #{job.inspect}")
  error.backtrace.each_with_index do |line, i|
    Rails.logger.error(
      "err#{error.object_id} #{i}: #{line}")
  end
end

Callbacks

Rufus::Scheduler #on_pre_trigger and #on_post_trigger callbacks

One can bind callbacks before and after jobs trigger:

s = Rufus::Scheduler.new

def s.on_pre_trigger(job, trigger_time)
  puts "triggering job #{job.id}..."
end

def s.on_post_trigger(job, trigger_time)
  puts "triggered job #{job.id}."
end

s.every '1s' do
  # ...
end

The trigger_time is the time at which the job triggers. It might be a bit before Time.now.

Warning: these two callbacks are executed in the scheduler thread, not in the work threads (the threads where the job execution really happens).

Rufus::Scheduler#around_trigger

One can create an around callback which will wrap a job:

def s.around_trigger(job)
  t = Time.now
  puts "Starting job #{job.id}..."
  yield
  puts "job #{job.id} finished in #{Time.now-t} seconds."
end

The around callback is executed in the thread.

Rufus::Scheduler#on_pre_trigger as a guard

Returning false in on_pre_trigger will prevent the job from triggering. Returning anything else (nil, -1, true, ...) will let the job trigger.

Note: your business logic should go in the scheduled block itself (or the scheduled instance). Don't put business logic in on_pre_trigger. Return false for admin reasons (backend down, etc), not for business reasons that are tied to the job itself.

def s.on_pre_trigger(job, trigger_time)

  return false if Backend.down?

  puts "triggering job #{job.id}..."
end

Rufus::Scheduler.new options

:frequency

By default, rufus-scheduler sleeps 0.300 second between every step. At each step it checks for jobs to trigger and so on.

The :frequency option lets you change that 0.300 second to something else.

scheduler = Rufus::Scheduler.new(frequency: 5)

It's OK to use a time string to specify the frequency.

scheduler = Rufus::Scheduler.new(frequency: '2h10m')
  # this scheduler will sleep 2 hours and 10 minutes between every "step"

Use with care.

lockfile: "mylockfile.txt"

This feature only works on OSes that support the flock (man 2 flock) call.

Starting the scheduler with lockfile: '.rufus-scheduler.lock' will make the scheduler attempt to create and lock the file .rufus-scheduler.lock in the current working directory. If that fails, the scheduler will not start.

The idea is to guarantee only one scheduler (in a group of schedulers sharing the same lockfile) is running.

This is useful in environments where the Ruby process holding the scheduler gets started multiple times.

If the lockfile mechanism here is not sufficient, you can plug your custom mechanism. It's explained in advanced lock schemes below.

:scheduler_lock

(since rufus-scheduler 3.0.9)

The scheduler lock is an object that responds to #lock and #unlock. The scheduler calls #lock when starting up. If the answer is false, the scheduler stops its initialization work and won't schedule anything.

Here is a sample of a scheduler lock that only lets the scheduler on host "coffee.example.com" start:

class HostLock
  def initialize(lock_name)
    @lock_name = lock_name
  end
  def lock
    @lock_name == `hostname -f`.strip
  end
  def unlock
    true
  end
end

scheduler =
  Rufus::Scheduler.new(scheduler_lock: HostLock.new('coffee.example.com'))

By default, the scheduler_lock is an instance of Rufus::Scheduler::NullLock, with a #lock that returns true.

:trigger_lock

(since rufus-scheduler 3.0.9)

The trigger lock in an object that responds to #lock. The scheduler calls that method on the job lock right before triggering any job. If the answer is false, the trigger doesn't happen, the job is not done (at least not in this scheduler).

Here is a (stupid) PingLock example, it'll only trigger if an "other host" is not responding to ping. Do not use that in production, you don't want to fork a ping process for each trigger attempt...

class PingLock
  def initialize(other_host)
    @other_host = other_host
  end
  def lock
    ! system("ping -c 1 #{@other_host}")
  end
end

scheduler =
  Rufus::Scheduler.new(trigger_lock: PingLock.new('main.example.com'))

By default, the trigger_lock is an instance of Rufus::Scheduler::NullLock, with a #lock that always returns true.

As explained in advanced lock schemes, another way to tune that behaviour is by overriding the scheduler's #confirm_lock method. (You could also do that with an #on_pre_trigger callback).

:max_work_threads

In rufus-scheduler 2.x, by default, each job triggering received its own, brand new, thread of execution. In rufus-scheduler 3.x, execution happens in a pooled work thread. The max work thread count (the pool size) defaults to 28.

One can set this maximum value when starting the scheduler.

scheduler = Rufus::Scheduler.new(max_work_threads: 77)

It's OK to increase the :max_work_threads of a running scheduler.

scheduler.max_work_threads += 10

Rufus::Scheduler.singleton

Do not want to store a reference to your rufus-scheduler instance? Then Rufus::Scheduler.singleton can help, it returns a singleton instance of the scheduler, initialized the first time this class method is called.

Rufus::Scheduler.singleton.every '10s' { puts "hello, world!" }

It's OK to pass initialization arguments (like :frequency or :max_work_threads) but they will only be taken into account the first time .singleton is called.

Rufus::Scheduler.singleton(max_work_threads: 77)
Rufus::Scheduler.singleton(max_work_threads: 277) # no effect

The .s is a shortcut for .singleton.

Rufus::Scheduler.s.every '10s' { puts "hello, world!" }

advanced lock schemes

As seen above, rufus-scheduler proposes the :lockfile system out of the box. If in a group of schedulers only one is supposed to run, the lockfile mechanism prevents schedulers that have not set/created the lockfile from running.

There are situations where this is not sufficient.

By overriding #lock and #unlock, one can customize how schedulers lock.

This example was provided by Eric Lindvall:

class ZookeptScheduler < Rufus::Scheduler

  def initialize(zookeeper, opts={})
    @zk = zookeeper
    super(opts)
  end

  def lock
    @zk_locker = @zk.exclusive_locker('scheduler')
    @zk_locker.lock # returns true if the lock was acquired, false else
  end

  def unlock
    @zk_locker.unlock
  end

  def confirm_lock
    return false if down?
    @zk_locker.assert!
  rescue ZK::Exceptions::LockAssertionFailedError => e
    # we've lost the lock, shutdown (and return false to at least prevent
    # this job from triggering
    shutdown
    false
  end
end

This uses a zookeeper to make sure only one scheduler in a group of distributed schedulers runs.

The methods #lock and #unlock are overridden and #confirm_lock is provided, to make sure that the lock is still valid.

The #confirm_lock method is called right before a job triggers (if it is provided). The more generic callback #on_pre_trigger is called right after #confirm_lock.

:scheduler_lock and :trigger_lock

(introduced in rufus-scheduler 3.0.9).

Another way of prodiving #lock, #unlock and #confirm_lock to a rufus-scheduler is by using the :scheduler_lock and :trigger_lock options.

See :trigger_lock and :scheduler_lock.

The scheduler lock may be used to prevent a scheduler from starting, while a trigger lock prevents individual jobs from triggering (the scheduler goes on scheduling).

One has to be careful with what goes in #confirm_lock or in a trigger lock, as it gets called before each trigger.

Warning: you may think you're heading towards "high availability" by using a trigger lock and having lots of schedulers at hand. It may be so if you limit yourself to scheduling the same set of jobs at scheduler startup. But if you add schedules at runtime, they stay local to their scheduler. There is no magic that propagates the jobs to all the schedulers in your pack.

parsing cronlines and time strings

(Please note that fugit does the heavy-lifting parsing work for rufus-scheduler).

Rufus::Scheduler provides a class method .parse to parse time durations and cron strings. It's what it's using when receiving schedules. One can use it directly (no need to instantiate a Scheduler).

require 'rufus-scheduler'

Rufus::Scheduler.parse('1w2d')
  # => 777600.0
Rufus::Scheduler.parse('1.0w1.0d')
  # => 777600.0

Rufus::Scheduler.parse('Sun Nov 18 16:01:00 2012').strftime('%c')
  # => 'Sun Nov 18 16:01:00 2012'

Rufus::Scheduler.parse('Sun Nov 18 16:01:00 2012 Europe/Berlin').strftime('%c %z')
  # => 'Sun Nov 18 15:01:00 2012 +0000'

Rufus::Scheduler.parse(0.1)
  # => 0.1

Rufus::Scheduler.parse('* * * * *')
  # => #<Fugit::Cron:0x00007fb7a3045508
  #      @original="* * * * *", @cron_s=nil,
  #      @seconds=[0], @minutes=nil, @hours=nil, @monthdays=nil, @months=nil,
  #      @weekdays=nil, @zone=nil, @timezone=nil>

It returns a number when the input is a duration and a Fugit::Cron instance when the input is a cron string.

It will raise an ArgumentError if it can't parse the input.

Beyond .parse, there are also .parse_cron and .parse_duration, for finer granularity.

There is an interesting helper method named .to_duration_hash:

require 'rufus-scheduler'

Rufus::Scheduler.to_duration_hash(60)
  # => { :m => 1 }
Rufus::Scheduler.to_duration_hash(62.127)
  # => { :m => 1, :s => 2, :ms => 127 }

Rufus::Scheduler.to_duration_hash(62.127, drop_seconds: true)
  # => { :m => 1 }

cronline notations specific to rufus-scheduler

first Monday, last Sunday et al

To schedule something at noon every first Monday of the month:

scheduler.cron('00 12 * * mon#1') do
  # ...
end

To schedule something at noon the last Sunday of every month:

scheduler.cron('00 12 * * sun#-1') do
  # ...
end
#
# OR
#
scheduler.cron('00 12 * * sun#L') do
  # ...
end

Such cronlines can be tested with scripts like:

require 'rufus-scheduler'

Time.now
  # => 2013-10-26 07:07:08 +0900
Rufus::Scheduler.parse('* * * * mon#1').next_time.to_s
  # => 2013-11-04 00:00:00 +0900

L (last day of month)

L can be used in the "day" slot:

In this example, the cronline is supposed to trigger every last day of the month at noon:

require 'rufus-scheduler'
Time.now
  # => 2013-10-26 07:22:09 +0900
Rufus::Scheduler.parse('00 12 L * *').next_time.to_s
  # => 2013-10-31 12:00:00 +0900

negative day (x days before the end of the month)

It's OK to pass negative values in the "day" slot:

scheduler.cron '0 0 -5 * *' do
  # do it at 00h00 5 days before the end of the month...
end

Negative ranges (-10--5-: 10 days before the end of the month to 5 days before the end of the month) are OK, but mixed positive / negative ranges will raise an ArgumentError.

Negative ranges with increments (-10---2/2) are accepted as well.

Descending day ranges are not accepted (10-8 or -8--10 for example).

a note about timezones

Cron schedules and at schedules support the specification of a timezone.

scheduler.cron '0 22 * * 1-5 America/Chicago' do
  # the job...
end

scheduler.at '2013-12-12 14:00 Pacific/Samoa' do
  puts "it's tea time!"
end

# or even

Rufus::Scheduler.parse("2013-12-12 14:00 Pacific/Saipan")
  # => #<Rufus::Scheduler::ZoTime:0x007fb424abf4e8 @seconds=1386820800.0, @zone=#<TZInfo::DataTimezone: Pacific/Saipan>, @time=nil>

I get "zotime.rb:41:in `initialize': cannot determine timezone from nil"

For when you see an error like:

rufus-scheduler/lib/rufus/scheduler/zotime.rb:41:
  in `initialize':
    cannot determine timezone from nil (etz:nil,tnz:"中国标准时间",tzid:nil)
      (ArgumentError)
    from rufus-scheduler/lib/rufus/scheduler/zotime.rb:198:in `new'
    from rufus-scheduler/lib/rufus/scheduler/zotime.rb:198:in `now'
    from rufus-scheduler/lib/rufus/scheduler.rb:561:in `start'
    ...

It may happen on Windows or on systems that poorly hint to Ruby which timezone to use. It should be solved by setting explicitly the ENV['TZ'] before the scheduler instantiation:

ENV['TZ'] = 'Asia/Shanghai'
scheduler = Rufus::Scheduler.new
scheduler.every '2s' do
  puts "#{Time.now} Hello #{ENV['TZ']}!"
end

On Rails you might want to try with:

ENV['TZ'] = Time.zone.name # Rails only
scheduler = Rufus::Scheduler.new
scheduler.every '2s' do
  puts "#{Time.now} Hello #{ENV['TZ']}!"
end

(Hat tip to Alexander in gh-230)

Rails sets its timezone under config/application.rb.

Rufus-Scheduler 3.3.3 detects the presence of Rails and uses its timezone setting (tested with Rails 4), so setting ENV['TZ'] should not be necessary.

The value can be determined thanks to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_tz_database_time_zones.

Use a "continent/city" identifier (for example "Asia/Shanghai"). Do not use an abbreviation (not "CST") and do not use a local time zone name (not "中国标准时间" nor "Eastern Standard Time" which, for instance, points to a time zone in America and to another one in Australia...).

If the error persists (and especially on Windows), try to add the tzinfo-data to your Gemfile, as in:

gem 'tzinfo-data'

or by manually requiring it before requiring rufus-scheduler (if you don't use Bundler):

require 'tzinfo/data'
require 'rufus-scheduler'

so Rails?

Yes, I know, all of the above is boring and you're only looking for a snippet to paste in your Ruby-on-Rails application to schedule...

Here is an example initializer:

#
# config/initializers/scheduler.rb

require 'rufus-scheduler'

# Let's use the rufus-scheduler singleton
#
s = Rufus::Scheduler.singleton


# Stupid recurrent task...
#
s.every '1m' do

  Rails.logger.info "hello, it's #{Time.now}"
  Rails.logger.flush
end

And now you tell me that this is good, but you want to schedule stuff from your controller.

Maybe:

class ScheController < ApplicationController

  # GET /sche/
  #
  def index

    job_id =
      Rufus::Scheduler.singleton.in '5s' do
        Rails.logger.info "time flies, it's now #{Time.now}"
      end

    render text: "scheduled job #{job_id}"
  end
end

The rufus-scheduler singleton is instantiated in the config/initializers/scheduler.rb file, it's then available throughout the webapp via Rufus::Scheduler.singleton.

Warning: this works well with single-process Ruby servers like Webrick and Thin. Using rufus-scheduler with Passenger or Unicorn requires a bit more knowledge and tuning, gently provided by a bit of googling and reading, see Faq above.

avoid scheduling when running the Ruby on Rails console

(Written in reply to gh-186)

If you don't want rufus-scheduler to trigger anything while running the Ruby on Rails console, running for tests/specs, or running from a Rake task, you can insert a conditional return statement before jobs are added to the scheduler instance:

#
# config/initializers/scheduler.rb

require 'rufus-scheduler'

return if defined?(Rails::Console) || Rails.env.test? || File.split($PROGRAM_NAME).last == 'rake'
  #
  # do not schedule when Rails is run from its console, for a test/spec, or
  # from a Rake task

# return if $PROGRAM_NAME.include?('spring')
  #
  # see https://github.com/jmettraux/rufus-scheduler/issues/186

s = Rufus::Scheduler.singleton

s.every '1m' do
  Rails.logger.info "hello, it's #{Time.now}"
  Rails.logger.flush
end

(Beware later version of Rails where Spring takes care pre-running the initializers. Running spring stop or disabling Spring might be necessary in some cases to see changes to initializers being taken into account.)

rails server -d

(Written in reply to https://github.com/jmettraux/rufus-scheduler/issues/165 )

There is the handy rails server -d that starts a development Rails as a daemon. The annoying thing is that the scheduler as seen above is started in the main process that then gets forked and daemonized. The rufus-scheduler thread (and any other thread) gets lost, no scheduling happens.

I avoid running -d in development mode and bother about daemonizing only for production deployment.

These are two well crafted articles on process daemonization, please read them:

If, anyway, you need something like rails server -d, why not try bundle exec unicorn -D instead? In my (limited) experience, it worked out of the box (well, had to add gem 'unicorn' to Gemfile first).

executor / reloader

You might benefit from wraping your scheduled code in the executor or reloader. Read more here: https://guides.rubyonrails.org/threading_and_code_execution.html

support

see getting help above.


Author: jmettraux
Source code: https://github.com/jmettraux/rufus-scheduler
License: MIT license

#ruby 

jackson ella

jackson ella

1619108620

What are the reasons for transfers failed on Cash App? -To Fix This Issue

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