Getting started with React Router

Introduction

One of the simple definition of routing is navigation between pages. Routing is provided by many JavaScript frameworks especially React. React is a JavaScript library for building user interfaces.

Introducing Routing in React

React provides several libraries for routing. React community provides several routing solutions available here. Let’s take a look at the React routing libraries download statistics over time:

Compare npm package download statistics over time: aviator vs component-router vs director vs finch vs react-router vs router5

React Router is the popular routing library for React.

Introducing React Router

Built and maintained by React Training team, React Router is a powerful routing library. React Router 4 is the latest version and was divided into four packages:

  • react-router: the core of React Router;
  • react-router-dom: the dom version designed for browsers or web apps;
  • react-router-native: the native version designed for react-native mobile apps;
  • react-router-config: all static route configuration helpers.

What you’ll learn

You’re here to learn about routing in <a href="https://www.dunebook.com/react-examples-best-websites-built-using-react/" target="_blank">React</a> applications, and, in this post, we are going to cover the basics of Routing in React applications. The methods of routing we will explore are:

  • Basic Routing
  • Nested Routes
  • URL Parameters
  • 404 Pages
  • Redirects (Authentication)

Let’s create a simple app to illustrate React Router basics.

We will be using a lot of components which is part of a sample application to explain routing. Take a look at this app:

Where does that come from? 😄

npx create-react-app remote-tools-app
cd remote-tools-app
npm install --save bootstrap
npm install react-router-dom

We installed bootstrap package to make the app look pretty and react-router-dom package. I do not display the complete source code of the files but only the important parts for the understanding of this article. You can access the source code at the end of this article.

The first thing to do is to import BrowserRouter for browser-based projects. Just surround your app with that component. So your app is ready to use React Router.

import { BrowserRouter } from 'react-router-dom';

ReactDOM.render(
    <BrowserRouter>
        <App />
    <BrowserRouter>,
    document.getElementById('root'));

One of the elements that allow us to navigate between pages remains the links. React Router allows you to create components to navigate between pages. For example,

<Link to="/"> Remote tools </Link>

The <Link> component has an attribute called to which is similar to the href attribute.

Once a link is created in your application, it is important to match a link with a React component. Say hello to <Route> component:

<Header />
  <Switch>
    <Route exact path="/" component={Home} />
  <Switch/>
<Footer />

You can simply read the code above like this: switch the <Home> component between Header and Footer components when the path is /. What would become something like below:

<Header /> 
  <Home></Home>
<Footer />

Otherwise, we would have:

<Header /> 
<Footer />

Do you know when we have the case above? When a path does not exist for example (remember page not found errors).

You can handle those cases with React Router too.

<Header /> 
  <Switch> 
    <Route exact path="/" component={Home} /> 
    <Route component={NotFound} /> </Switch>
<Footer />

If the path “/” match display Home component. If not, display <NotFound> component.

When creating applications, you often need to add restrictions: authorization, authentication, etc. For example, you want to prevent <Collection> component from being displayed only for logged users. React Router allows you to create a <PrivateRoute> component:

<Header /> 
  <Switch> 
    <Route exact path="/" component={Home} /> 
    <Route path="/login" component={Login} />
    <PrivateRoute authed={false} path="/collections" component={Collection} /> </Switch>
    <Route component={NotFound} /> 
  </Switch>
<Footer />

React Router lets you create a <PrivateRoute> component. Let’s look at this below:

import React from 'react'
import {
  Route,
  Redirect
} from 'react-router-dom'
 
function PrivateRoute({component: Component, authed, ...rest}) {
  return (
    <Route
      {...rest}
      render={(props) => authed === true
        ? <Component {...props} />
        : <Redirect to="/login" />
      }
  )
}
export default PrivateRoute 

Simple. It is a component that returns a <Route> component based on parameters, including the authed attribute. We use <Redirect> component which allows a redirection if the condition is not fulfilled.

If you want to see if the route is protected, change the authed parameter from false to true and see the result.

At this point, our app is about almost done. We still need to add nested routes.

<Header /> 
  <Switch> 
    <Route exact path="/" component={Home} />
    <Route path="/login" component={Login} />
    <Route path="/products/:product" component={Product} />
    <PrivateRoute authed={false} path="/collections" component={Collection} /> </Switch>
    <Route component={NotFound} /> 
  </Switch>
<Footer />

It’s a <Route> component again with a path (/products/:product) and a component (Product). And you can access this parameter like below:

const Product = ({ match }) => {
  console.log(match.params.product) 
} 

Congrats! You can now play with routing in React apps. The full codebase is on Github.

#reactjs #javascript

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Getting started with React Router
Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1598839687

How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

If you are undertaking a mobile app development for your start-up or enterprise, you are likely wondering whether to use React Native. As a popular development framework, React Native helps you to develop near-native mobile apps. However, you are probably also wondering how close you can get to a native app by using React Native. How native is React Native?

In the article, we discuss the similarities between native mobile development and development using React Native. We also touch upon where they differ and how to bridge the gaps. Read on.

A brief introduction to React Native

Let’s briefly set the context first. We will briefly touch upon what React Native is and how it differs from earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is a popular JavaScript framework that Facebook has created. You can use this open-source framework to code natively rendering Android and iOS mobile apps. You can use it to develop web apps too.

Facebook has developed React Native based on React, its JavaScript library. The first release of React Native came in March 2015. At the time of writing this article, the latest stable release of React Native is 0.62.0, and it was released in March 2020.

Although relatively new, React Native has acquired a high degree of popularity. The “Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019” report identifies it as the 8th most loved framework. Facebook, Walmart, and Bloomberg are some of the top companies that use React Native.

The popularity of React Native comes from its advantages. Some of its advantages are as follows:

  • Performance: It delivers optimal performance.
  • Cross-platform development: You can develop both Android and iOS apps with it. The reuse of code expedites development and reduces costs.
  • UI design: React Native enables you to design simple and responsive UI for your mobile app.
  • 3rd party plugins: This framework supports 3rd party plugins.
  • Developer community: A vibrant community of developers support React Native.

Why React Native is fundamentally different from earlier hybrid frameworks

Are you wondering whether React Native is just another of those hybrid frameworks like Ionic or Cordova? It’s not! React Native is fundamentally different from these earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is very close to native. Consider the following aspects as described on the React Native website:

  • Access to many native platforms features: The primitives of React Native render to native platform UI. This means that your React Native app will use many native platform APIs as native apps would do.
  • Near-native user experience: React Native provides several native components, and these are platform agnostic.
  • The ease of accessing native APIs: React Native uses a declarative UI paradigm. This enables React Native to interact easily with native platform APIs since React Native wraps existing native code.

Due to these factors, React Native offers many more advantages compared to those earlier hybrid frameworks. We now review them.

#android app #frontend #ios app #mobile app development #benefits of react native #is react native good for mobile app development #native vs #pros and cons of react native #react mobile development #react native development #react native experience #react native framework #react native ios vs android #react native pros and cons #react native vs android #react native vs native #react native vs native performance #react vs native #why react native #why use react native

Shubham Ankit

Shubham Ankit

1657081614

How to Automate Excel with Python | Python Excel Tutorial (OpenPyXL)

How to Automate Excel with Python

In this article, We will show how we can use python to automate Excel . A useful Python library is Openpyxl which we will learn to do Excel Automation

What is OPENPYXL

Openpyxl is a Python library that is used to read from an Excel file or write to an Excel file. Data scientists use Openpyxl for data analysis, data copying, data mining, drawing charts, styling sheets, adding formulas, and more.

Workbook: A spreadsheet is represented as a workbook in openpyxl. A workbook consists of one or more sheets.

Sheet: A sheet is a single page composed of cells for organizing data.

Cell: The intersection of a row and a column is called a cell. Usually represented by A1, B5, etc.

Row: A row is a horizontal line represented by a number (1,2, etc.).

Column: A column is a vertical line represented by a capital letter (A, B, etc.).

Openpyxl can be installed using the pip command and it is recommended to install it in a virtual environment.

pip install openpyxl

CREATE A NEW WORKBOOK

We start by creating a new spreadsheet, which is called a workbook in Openpyxl. We import the workbook module from Openpyxl and use the function Workbook() which creates a new workbook.

from openpyxl
import Workbook
#creates a new workbook
wb = Workbook()
#Gets the first active worksheet
ws = wb.active
#creating new worksheets by using the create_sheet method

ws1 = wb.create_sheet("sheet1", 0) #inserts at first position
ws2 = wb.create_sheet("sheet2") #inserts at last position
ws3 = wb.create_sheet("sheet3", -1) #inserts at penultimate position

#Renaming the sheet
ws.title = "Example"

#save the workbook
wb.save(filename = "example.xlsx")

READING DATA FROM WORKBOOK

We load the file using the function load_Workbook() which takes the filename as an argument. The file must be saved in the same working directory.

#loading a workbook
wb = openpyxl.load_workbook("example.xlsx")

 

GETTING SHEETS FROM THE LOADED WORKBOOK

 

#getting sheet names
wb.sheetnames
result = ['sheet1', 'Sheet', 'sheet3', 'sheet2']

#getting a particular sheet
sheet1 = wb["sheet2"]

#getting sheet title
sheet1.title
result = 'sheet2'

#Getting the active sheet
sheetactive = wb.active
result = 'sheet1'

 

ACCESSING CELLS AND CELL VALUES

 

#get a cell from the sheet
sheet1["A1"] <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A1 >

  #get the cell value
ws["A1"].value 'Segment'

#accessing cell using row and column and assigning a value
d = ws.cell(row = 4, column = 2, value = 10)
d.value
10

 

ITERATING THROUGH ROWS AND COLUMNS

 

#looping through each row and column
for x in range(1, 5):
  for y in range(1, 5):
  print(x, y, ws.cell(row = x, column = y)
    .value)

#getting the highest row number
ws.max_row
701

#getting the highest column number
ws.max_column
19

There are two functions for iterating through rows and columns.

Iter_rows() => returns the rows
Iter_cols() => returns the columns {
  min_row = 4, max_row = 5, min_col = 2, max_col = 5
} => This can be used to set the boundaries
for any iteration.

Example:

#iterating rows
for row in ws.iter_rows(min_row = 2, max_col = 3, max_row = 3):
  for cell in row:
  print(cell) <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.B2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.C2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A3 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.B3 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.C3 >

  #iterating columns
for col in ws.iter_cols(min_row = 2, max_col = 3, max_row = 3):
  for cell in col:
  print(cell) <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A3 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.B2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.B3 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.C2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.C3 >

To get all the rows of the worksheet we use the method worksheet.rows and to get all the columns of the worksheet we use the method worksheet.columns. Similarly, to iterate only through the values we use the method worksheet.values.


Example:

for row in ws.values:
  for value in row:
  print(value)

 

WRITING DATA TO AN EXCEL FILE

Writing to a workbook can be done in many ways such as adding a formula, adding charts, images, updating cell values, inserting rows and columns, etc… We will discuss each of these with an example.

 

CREATING AND SAVING A NEW WORKBOOK

 

#creates a new workbook
wb = openpyxl.Workbook()

#saving the workbook
wb.save("new.xlsx")

 

ADDING AND REMOVING SHEETS

 

#creating a new sheet
ws1 = wb.create_sheet(title = "sheet 2")

#creating a new sheet at index 0
ws2 = wb.create_sheet(index = 0, title = "sheet 0")

#checking the sheet names
wb.sheetnames['sheet 0', 'Sheet', 'sheet 2']

#deleting a sheet
del wb['sheet 0']

#checking sheetnames
wb.sheetnames['Sheet', 'sheet 2']

 

ADDING CELL VALUES

 

#checking the sheet value
ws['B2'].value
null

#adding value to cell
ws['B2'] = 367

#checking value
ws['B2'].value
367

 

ADDING FORMULAS

 

We often require formulas to be included in our Excel datasheet. We can easily add formulas using the Openpyxl module just like you add values to a cell.
 

For example:

import openpyxl
from openpyxl
import Workbook

wb = openpyxl.load_workbook("new1.xlsx")
ws = wb['Sheet']

ws['A9'] = '=SUM(A2:A8)'

wb.save("new2.xlsx")

The above program will add the formula (=SUM(A2:A8)) in cell A9. The result will be as below.

image

 

MERGE/UNMERGE CELLS

Two or more cells can be merged to a rectangular area using the method merge_cells(), and similarly, they can be unmerged using the method unmerge_cells().

For example:
Merge cells

#merge cells B2 to C9
ws.merge_cells('B2:C9')
ws['B2'] = "Merged cells"

Adding the above code to the previous example will merge cells as below.

image

UNMERGE CELLS

 

#unmerge cells B2 to C9
ws.unmerge_cells('B2:C9')

The above code will unmerge cells from B2 to C9.

INSERTING AN IMAGE

To insert an image we import the image function from the module openpyxl.drawing.image. We then load our image and add it to the cell as shown in the below example.

Example:

import openpyxl
from openpyxl
import Workbook
from openpyxl.drawing.image
import Image

wb = openpyxl.load_workbook("new1.xlsx")
ws = wb['Sheet']
#loading the image(should be in same folder)
img = Image('logo.png')
ws['A1'] = "Adding image"
#adjusting size
img.height = 130
img.width = 200
#adding img to cell A3

ws.add_image(img, 'A3')

wb.save("new2.xlsx")

Result:

image

CREATING CHARTS

Charts are essential to show a visualization of data. We can create charts from Excel data using the Openpyxl module chart. Different forms of charts such as line charts, bar charts, 3D line charts, etc., can be created. We need to create a reference that contains the data to be used for the chart, which is nothing but a selection of cells (rows and columns). I am using sample data to create a 3D bar chart in the below example:

Example

import openpyxl
from openpyxl
import Workbook
from openpyxl.chart
import BarChart3D, Reference, series

wb = openpyxl.load_workbook("example.xlsx")
ws = wb.active

values = Reference(ws, min_col = 3, min_row = 2, max_col = 3, max_row = 40)
chart = BarChart3D()
chart.add_data(values)
ws.add_chart(chart, "E3")
wb.save("MyChart.xlsx")

Result
image


How to Automate Excel with Python with Video Tutorial

Welcome to another video! In this video, We will cover how we can use python to automate Excel. I'll be going over everything from creating workbooks to accessing individual cells and stylizing cells. There is a ton of things that you can do with Excel but I'll just be covering the core/base things in OpenPyXl.

⭐️ Timestamps ⭐️
00:00 | Introduction
02:14 | Installing openpyxl
03:19 | Testing Installation
04:25 | Loading an Existing Workbook
06:46 | Accessing Worksheets
07:37 | Accessing Cell Values
08:58 | Saving Workbooks
09:52 | Creating, Listing and Changing Sheets
11:50 | Creating a New Workbook
12:39 | Adding/Appending Rows
14:26 | Accessing Multiple Cells
20:46 | Merging Cells
22:27 | Inserting and Deleting Rows
23:35 | Inserting and Deleting Columns
24:48 | Copying and Moving Cells
26:06 | Practical Example, Formulas & Cell Styling

📄 Resources 📄
OpenPyXL Docs: https://openpyxl.readthedocs.io/en/stable/ 
Code Written in This Tutorial: https://github.com/techwithtim/ExcelPythonTutorial 
Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/TechWithTim/featured 

#python 

Carroll  Klein

Carroll Klein

1590546900

How React Hooks can replace React Router

Looking to learn more about hookrouter and how it works? Follow along with this tutorial to learn more.

#react #react-native #react hooks #react router

How to Get Started With React Router, In-Depth Explanation With Project

What will you consider most important for any application? don’t get intrigued okay. Just take a minute to think what’s the first thing you do when visiting a website. Mostly, looking around and clicking, by clicking on something it does some actions, right? Maybe take you to another page or show you some popups and so on.

My point here is, in any application there a is a bunch of pages to show different information that you can navigate to/from. e.g. you have a portfolio site to show off yourself, how’d you do that? probably the best way is to maintain several pages/components to show different information about you. such as about meskillsprojects etc.

Let’s say, you want it to build that with React js. You’d like the visitor to learn about you, it’s important to keep things organized, you don’t want them to be confused. Keeping your app sweet and simple is the key. One way to that is to break down your app into components. e.g. keep Home to give a brief introduction about yourself, then About usProjects, etc pages to show respective info.

But you got to use some kinda navigation system, right?

So, In react you can easily implement navigation using a package called React Router.

Getting started with React Router

We’re gonna built a simple routing project with react-router-dom.

application demo

To begin with, let’s create a react application using [create-react-app](https://github.com/facebook/create-react-app).

npx create-react-app app-name
cd app-name
npm start

After that, on another tab/ctrl+c on the current tab on your terminal, install react-router-dom using this command,

npm install react-router-dom

#react-tutorial #reactjs #react-router #javascript #front-end-development #react

Monty  Boehm

Monty Boehm

1659453850

Twitter.jl: Julia Package to Access Twitter API

Twitter.jl

A Julia package for interacting with the Twitter API.

Twitter.jl is a Julia package to work with the Twitter API v1.1. Currently, only the REST API methods are supported; streaming API endpoints aren't implemented at this time.

All functions have required arguments for those parameters required by Twitter and an options keyword argument to provide a Dict{String, String} of optional parameters Twitter API documentation. Most function calls will return either a Dict or an Array <: TwitterType. Bad requests will return the response code from the API (403, 404, etc).

DataFrame methods are defined for functions returning composite types: Tweets, Places, Lists, and Users.

Authentication

Before one can make use of this package, you must create an application on the Twitter's Developer Platform.

Once your application is approved, you can access your dashboard/portal to grab your authentication credentials from the "Details" tab of the application.

Note that you will also want to ensure that your App has Read / Write OAuth access in order to post tweets. You can find out more about this on Stack Overflow.

Installation

To install this package, enter ] on the REPL to bring up Julia's package manager. Then add the package:

julia> ]
(v1.7) pkg> add Twitter

Tip: Press Ctrl+C to return to the julia> prompt.

Usage

To run Twitter.jl, enter the following command in your Julia REPL

julia> using Twitter

Then the a global variable has to be declared with the twitterauth function. This function holds the consumer_key(API Key), consumer_secret(API Key Secret), oauth_token(Access Token), and oauth_secret(Access Token Secret) respectively.

twitterauth("6nOtpXmf...", # API Key
            "sES5Zlj096S...", # API Key Secret
            "98689850-Hj...", # Access Token
            "UroqCVpWKIt...") # Access Token Secret
  • Ensure you put your credentials in an env file to avoid pushing your secrets to the public 🙀.

Note: This package does not currently support OAuth authentication.

Code examples

See runtests.jl for example function calls.

using Twitter, Test
using JSON, OAuth

# set debugging
ENV["JULIA_DEBUG"]=Twitter

twitterauth(ENV["CONSUMER_KEY"], ENV["CONSUMER_SECRET"], ENV["ACCESS_TOKEN"], ENV["ACCESS_TOKEN_SECRET"])

#get_mentions_timeline
mentions_timeline_default = get_mentions_timeline()
tw = mentions_timeline_default[1]
tw_df = DataFrame(mentions_timeline_default)
@test 0 <= length(mentions_timeline_default) <= 20
@test typeof(mentions_timeline_default) == Vector{Tweets}
@test typeof(tw) == Tweets
@test size(tw_df)[2] == 30

#get_user_timeline
user_timeline_default = get_user_timeline(screen_name = "randyzwitch")
@test typeof(user_timeline_default) == Vector{Tweets}

#get_home_timeline
home_timeline_default = get_home_timeline()
@test typeof(home_timeline_default) == Vector{Tweets}

#get_single_tweet_id
get_tweet_by_id = get_single_tweet_id(id = "434685122671939584")
@test typeof(get_tweet_by_id) == Tweets

#get_search_tweets
duke_tweets = get_search_tweets(q = "#Duke", count = 200)
@test typeof(duke_tweets) <: Dict

#test sending/deleting direct messages
#commenting out because Twitter API changed. Come back to fix
# send_dm = post_direct_messages_send(text = "Testing from Julia, this might disappear later $(time())", screen_name = "randyzwitch")
# get_single_dm = get_direct_messages_show(id = send_dm.id)
# destroy = post_direct_messages_destroy(id = send_dm.id)
# @test typeof(send_dm) == Tweets
# @test typeof(get_single_dm) == Tweets
# @test typeof(destroy) == Tweets

#creating/destroying friendships
add_friend = post_friendships_create(screen_name = "kyrieirving")

unfollow = post_friendships_destroy(screen_name = "kyrieirving")
unfollow_df = DataFrame(unfollow)
@test typeof(add_friend) == Users
@test typeof(unfollow) == Users
@test size(unfollow_df)[2] == 40

# create a cursor for follower ids
follow_cursor_test = get_followers_ids(screen_name = "twitter", count = 10_000)
@test length(follow_cursor_test["ids"]) == 10_000

# create a cursor for friend ids - use barackobama because he follows a lot of accounts!
friend_cursor_test = get_friends_ids(screen_name = "BarackObama", count = 10_000)
@test length(friend_cursor_test["ids"]) == 10_000

# create a test for home timelines
home_t = get_home_timeline(count = 2)
@test length(home_t) > 1

# TEST of cursoring functionality on user timelines
user_t = get_user_timeline(screen_name = "stefanjwojcik", count = 400)
@test length(user_t) == 400
# get the minimum ID of the tweets returned (the earliest)
minid = minimum(x.id for x in user_t);

# now iterate until you hit that tweet: should return 399
# WARNING: current versions of julia cannot use keywords in macros? read here: https://github.com/JuliaLang/julia/pull/29261
# eventually replace since_id = minid
tweets_since = get_user_timeline(screen_name = "stefanjwojcik", count = 400, since_id = 1001808621053898752, include_rts=1)

@test length(tweets_since)>=399

# testing get_mentions_timeline
mentions = get_mentions_timeline(screen_name = "stefanjwojcik", count = 300) 
@test length(mentions) >= 50 #sometimes API doesn't return number requested (twitter API specifies count is the max returned, may be much lower)
@test Tweets<:typeof(mentions[1])

# testing retweets_of_me
my_rts = get_retweets_of_me(count = 300)
@test Tweets<:typeof(my_rts[1])

Want to contribute?

Contributions are welcome! Kindly refer to the contribution guidelines.

Linux: Build Status 

CodeCov: codecov

Author: Randyzwitch
Source Code: https://github.com/randyzwitch/Twitter.jl 
License: View license

#julia #api #twitter