Dylan  Iqbal

Dylan Iqbal

1560837426

Securing RESTful API with Spring Boot, Security, and Data MongoDB

A comprehensive step by step tutorial on securing or authentication RESTful API with Spring Boot, Security, and Data MongoDB. Previously, we have shown you how to securing Spring Boot, MVC and MongoDB web application. In this tutorial, the secure endpoint will restrict the access from an unauthorized request. Every request to secure endpoint should bring authorization token with it. Of course, there will be an endpoint for login which will get authorization token after successful login.

Table of Contents:

  • Generate a New Spring Boot Gradle Project
  • Create Product, User and Role Model or Entity Classes
  • Create Product, User and Role Repository Interfaces
  • Create a Custom User Details Service
  • Configure Spring Boot Security Rest
  • Create Product and Authentication Controllers
  • Run and Test Spring Boot Security Rest using Postman

The following software, tools, and frameworks are required for this tutorial:

  • Generate a New Spring Boot Gradle Project
  • Create Product, User and Role Model or Entity Classes
  • Create Product, User and Role Repository Interfaces
  • Create a Custom User Details Service
  • Configure Spring Boot Security Rest
  • Create Product and Authentication Controllers
  • Run and Test Spring Boot Security Rest using Postman

We assume that you already installed all required software, tools, and frameworks. So, we will not cover how to install that software, tools, and frameworks.

1. Generate a New Spring Boot Gradle Project

To create or generate a new Spring Boot Application or Project, simply go to Spring Initializer. Fill all required fields as below then click on Generate Project button.

The project will automatically be downloaded as a Zip file. Next, extract the zipped project to your java projects folder. On the project folder root, you will find build.gradle file for register dependencies, initially it looks like this.

buildscript {
    ext {
        springBootVersion = '2.1.2.RELEASE'
    }
    repositories {
        mavenCentral()
    }
    dependencies {
        classpath("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-gradle-plugin:${springBootVersion}")
    }
}

apply plugin: 'java'
apply plugin: 'org.springframework.boot'
apply plugin: 'io.spring.dependency-management'

group = 'com.djamware'
version = '0.0.1-SNAPSHOT'
sourceCompatibility = '1.8'

repositories {
    mavenCentral()
}

dependencies {
    implementation 'org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-data-mongodb'
    implementation 'org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-security'
    implementation 'org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-web'
    testImplementation 'org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-test'
    testImplementation 'org.springframework.security:spring-security-test'
}

Now, you can work with the source code of this Spring Boot Project using your own IDE or Text Editor. We are using Spring Tool Suite (STS). In STS, import the extracted zipped file as Existing Gradle Project.

Next, we have to add the JWT library to the build.gradle as the dependency. Open and edit build.gradle then add this line to dependencies after other implementation.

implementation 'io.jsonwebtoken:jjwt:0.9.1'

Next, compile the Gradle Project by type this command from Terminal or CMD.

./gradlew compile

Or you can compile directly from STS by right-clicking the project name then choose Gradle -> Refresh Gradle Project. Next, open and edit src/main/resources/application.properties then add these lines.

spring.data.mongodb.database=springmongodb
spring.data.mongodb.host=localhost
spring.data.mongodb.port=27017

2. Create Product, User and Role Model or Entity Classes

We will be creating all required models or entities for products, user and role. In STS, right-click the project name -> New -> Class. Fill the package with com.djamware.SecurityRest.models, the name with Product, and leave other fields and checkbox as default then click Finish Button.

Next, open and edit src/main/java/com/djamware/SecurityRest/models/Product.java then add this annotation above the class name that will point to MongoDB collection.

@Document(collection = "products")

Inside Product class, add these variables.

@Id
String id;
String prodName;
String prodDesc;
Double prodPrice;
String prodImage;

Add constructors after the variable or fields.

public Product() {
}

public Product(String prodName, String prodDesc, Double prodPrice, String prodImage) {
    super();
    this.prodName = prodName;
    this.prodDesc = prodDesc;
    this.prodPrice = prodPrice;
    this.prodImage = prodImage;
}

Generate or create Getter and Setter for each field.

public String getId() {
    return id;
}

public void setId(String id) {
    this.id = id;
}

public String getProdName() {
    return prodName;
}

public void setProdName(String prodName) {
    this.prodName = prodName;
}

public String getProdDesc() {
    return prodDesc;
}

public void setProdDesc(String prodDesc) {
    this.prodDesc = prodDesc;
}

public Double getProdPrice() {
    return prodPrice;
}

public void setProdPrice(Double prodPrice) {
    this.prodPrice = prodPrice;
}

public String getProdImage() {
    return prodImage;
}

public void setProdImage(String prodImage) {
    this.prodImage = prodImage;
}

Using STS you can organize imports automatically from the menu Source -> Organize Imports then you can see the imports after the package name.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.models;

import org.springframework.data.annotation.Id;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.mapping.Document;

You can do the same way as the above step for User and Role class. Here’s the User class looks like.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.models;

import java.util.Set;

import org.springframework.data.annotation.Id;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.index.IndexDirection;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.index.Indexed;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.mapping.DBRef;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.mapping.Document;

@Document(collection = "users")
public class User {

    @Id
    private String id;
    @Indexed(unique = true, direction = IndexDirection.DESCENDING, dropDups = true)
    private String email;
    private String password;
    private String fullname;
    private boolean enabled;
    @DBRef
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;private Set<Role> roles;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public String getId() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return id;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setId(String id) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.id = id;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public String getEmail() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return email;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setEmail(String email) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.email = email;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public String getPassword() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return password;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setPassword(String password) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.password = password;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public String getFullname() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return fullname;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setFullname(String fullname) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.fullname = fullname;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public boolean isEnabled() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return enabled;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setEnabled(boolean enabled) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.enabled = enabled;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public Set<Role> getRoles() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return roles;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setRoles(Set<Role> roles) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.roles = roles;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}

}

And the Role class will be like this.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.models;

import org.springframework.data.annotation.Id;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.index.IndexDirection;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.index.Indexed;
import org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.mapping.Document;

@Document(collection = "roles")
public class Role {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@Id
&nbsp; &nbsp; private String id;
&nbsp; &nbsp; @Indexed(unique = true, direction = IndexDirection.DESCENDING, dropDups = true)

&nbsp; &nbsp; private String role;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public String getId() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return id;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setId(String id) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.id = id;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public String getRole() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return role;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setRole(String role) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.role = role;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}

}

3. Create Product, User and Role Repository Interfaces

Next steps to create Product, User, and Role Repository Interfaces. From the STS, right-click the project name -> New -> Interface then fill all required fields and checkboxes as below before click Finish button.

Next, open and edit src/main/java/com/djamware/SecurityRest/repositories/ProductRepository.java then add extends to MongoDB CRUD Repository.

public interface ProductRepository extends CrudRepository<Product, String> {

}

Inside the class name add this method.

@Override
void delete(Product deleted);

Organize all required imports.

import org.springframework.data.repository.CrudRepository;
import com.djamware.SecurityRest.models.Product;

The same way can be applied to User and Role repositories. So, the User Repository Interface will look like this.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.repositories;

import org.springframework.data.mongodb.repository.MongoRepository;
import com.djamware.SecurityRest.models.User;

public interface UserRepository extends MongoRepository<User, String> {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;User findByEmail(String email);
}

And the Role Repository Interface will look like this.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.repositories;

import org.springframework.data.mongodb.repository.MongoRepository;
import com.djamware.SecurityRest.models.Role;

public interface RoleRepository extends MongoRepository<Role, String> {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;Role findByRole(String role);
}

4. Create a Custom User Details Service

To implements authentication using existing User and Role from MongoDB, we have to create a custom user details service. From the STS, right-click the project name -> New -> Class File then fill all required fields and checkboxes as below before clicking the finish button.

Next, open and edit src/main/java/com/djamware/SecurityRest/services/CustomUserDetailsService.java then give an annotation above the class name and implement the Spring Security User Details Service.

@Service
public class CustomUserDetailsService implements UserDetailsService {
}

Next, inject all required beans at the first line of the class bracket.

@Autowired
private UserRepository userRepository;

@Autowired
private RoleRepository roleRepository;

@Autowired
private PasswordEncoder bCryptPasswordEncoder;

Add a method to find a user by email field.

public User findUserByEmail(String email) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; return userRepository.findByEmail(email);
}

Add a method to save a new user.

public void saveUser(User user) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; user.setPassword(bCryptPasswordEncoder.encode(user.getPassword()));
&nbsp; &nbsp; user.setEnabled(true);
&nbsp; &nbsp; Role userRole = roleRepository.findByRole("ADMIN");
&nbsp; &nbsp; user.setRoles(new HashSet<>(Arrays.asList(userRole)));
&nbsp; &nbsp; userRepository.save(user);
}

Override the Spring Security User Details to load User by email.

@Override
public UserDetails loadUserByUsername(String email) throws UsernameNotFoundException {

&nbsp; &nbsp; User user = userRepository.findByEmail(email);
&nbsp; &nbsp; if(user != null) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; List<GrantedAuthority> authorities = getUserAuthority(user.getRoles());
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return buildUserForAuthentication(user, authorities);
&nbsp; &nbsp; } else {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; throw new UsernameNotFoundException("username not found");
&nbsp; &nbsp; }
}

Add a method to get a set of Roles that related to a user.

private List<GrantedAuthority> getUserAuthority(Set<Role> userRoles) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; Set<GrantedAuthority> roles = new HashSet<>();
&nbsp; &nbsp; userRoles.forEach((role) -> {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; roles.add(new SimpleGrantedAuthority(role.getRole()));
&nbsp; &nbsp; });

&nbsp; &nbsp; List<GrantedAuthority> grantedAuthorities = new ArrayList<>(roles);
&nbsp; &nbsp; return grantedAuthorities;
}

Add a method for authentication purpose.

private UserDetails buildUserForAuthentication(User user, List<GrantedAuthority> authorities) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; return new org.springframework.security.core.userdetails.User(user.getEmail(), user.getPassword(), authorities);
}

5. Configure Spring Boot Security Rest

Now, the main purpose of this tutorial is configuring Spring Security Rest. First, we have to create a bean for JWT token generation and validation. Right-click the project name -> New -> Class File. Fill the package name as com.djamware.SecurityRest.configs and the Class name as JwtTokenProvider then click the Finish button. Next, open and edit that newly created class file then give it an annotation above the class name.

@Component
public class JwtTokenProvider {
}

 

 

Add variables and injected bean inside the class bracket at the top lines.

@Value("${security.jwt.token.secret-key:secret}")
private String secretKey = "secret";

@Value("${security.jwt.token.expire-length:3600000}")
private long validityInMilliseconds = 3600000; // 1h

@Autowired
private CustomUserDetailsService userDetailsService;

Add a method for initialization.

@PostConstruct
protected void init() {
&nbsp; &nbsp; secretKey = Base64.getEncoder().encodeToString(secretKey.getBytes());
}

Add a method to create a JWT token.

public String createToken(String username, Set<Role> set) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; Claims claims = Jwts.claims().setSubject(username);
&nbsp; &nbsp; claims.put("roles", set);
&nbsp; &nbsp; Date now = new Date();
&nbsp; &nbsp; Date validity = new Date(now.getTime() + validityInMilliseconds);
&nbsp; &nbsp; return Jwts.builder()//
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .setClaims(claims)//
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .setIssuedAt(now)//
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .setExpiration(validity)//
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .signWith(SignatureAlgorithm.HS256, secretKey)//
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .compact();
}

Add a method to load User by username.

public Authentication getAuthentication(String token) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; UserDetails userDetails = this.userDetailsService.loadUserByUsername(getUsername(token));
&nbsp; &nbsp; return new UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken(userDetails, "", userDetails.getAuthorities());
}

Add a method to get the username by JWT token.

public String getUsername(String token) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; return Jwts.parser().setSigningKey(secretKey).parseClaimsJws(token).getBody().getSubject();
}

Add a method to resolve JWT token from request headers of Authorization that has a Bearer prefix.

public String resolveToken(HttpServletRequest req) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; String bearerToken = req.getHeader("Authorization");
&nbsp; &nbsp; if (bearerToken != null && bearerToken.startsWith("Bearer ")) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return bearerToken.substring(7, bearerToken.length());
&nbsp; &nbsp; }
&nbsp; &nbsp; return null;
}

Add a method to validate a JWT token.

public boolean validateToken(String token) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; try {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Jws<Claims> claims = Jwts.parser().setSigningKey(secretKey).parseClaimsJws(token);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; if (claims.getBody().getExpiration().before(new Date())) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return false;
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; }
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return true;
&nbsp; &nbsp; } catch (JwtException | IllegalArgumentException e) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; throw new JwtException("Expired or invalid JWT token");
&nbsp; &nbsp; }
}

Finally, organize imports like below.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.configs;

import java.util.Base64;
import java.util.Date;
import java.util.Set;

import javax.annotation.PostConstruct;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletRequest;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Value;
import org.springframework.security.authentication.UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken;
import org.springframework.security.core.Authentication;
import org.springframework.security.core.userdetails.UserDetails;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Component;

import com.djamware.SecurityRest.models.Role;
import com.djamware.SecurityRest.services.CustomUserDetailsService;

import io.jsonwebtoken.Claims;
import io.jsonwebtoken.Jws;
import io.jsonwebtoken.JwtException;
import io.jsonwebtoken.Jwts;
import io.jsonwebtoken.SignatureAlgorithm;

Next, create a JWT filter class with the name JwtTokenFilter in configs package that extends Spring GenericFilterBean. Replace all Java codes with these lines of codes.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.configs;

import java.io.IOException;

import javax.servlet.FilterChain;
import javax.servlet.ServletException;
import javax.servlet.ServletRequest;
import javax.servlet.ServletResponse;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletRequest;

import org.springframework.security.core.Authentication;
import org.springframework.security.core.context.SecurityContextHolder;
import org.springframework.web.filter.GenericFilterBean;

public class JwtTokenFilter extends GenericFilterBean {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;private JwtTokenProvider jwtTokenProvider;

&nbsp; &nbsp; public JwtTokenFilter(JwtTokenProvider jwtTokenProvider) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; this.jwtTokenProvider = jwtTokenProvider;
&nbsp; &nbsp; }

&nbsp; &nbsp; @Override
&nbsp; &nbsp; public void doFilter(ServletRequest req, ServletResponse res, FilterChain filterChain)
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; throws IOException, ServletException {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; String token = jwtTokenProvider.resolveToken((HttpServletRequest) req);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; if (token != null && jwtTokenProvider.validateToken(token)) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Authentication auth = token != null ? jwtTokenProvider.getAuthentication(token) : null;
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; SecurityContextHolder.getContext().setAuthentication(auth);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; }
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; filterChain.doFilter(req, res);
&nbsp; &nbsp; }
}

Next, create a class with the name JwtConfigurer for JWT configuration in configs package then replace all codes with these lines of codes.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.configs;

import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.SecurityConfigurerAdapter;
import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.web.builders.HttpSecurity;
import org.springframework.security.web.DefaultSecurityFilterChain;
import org.springframework.security.web.authentication.UsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter;

public class JwtConfigurer extends SecurityConfigurerAdapter<DefaultSecurityFilterChain, HttpSecurity> {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;private JwtTokenProvider jwtTokenProvider;

&nbsp; &nbsp; public JwtConfigurer(JwtTokenProvider jwtTokenProvider) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; this.jwtTokenProvider = jwtTokenProvider;
&nbsp; &nbsp; }

&nbsp; &nbsp; @Override
&nbsp; &nbsp; public void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; JwtTokenFilter customFilter = new JwtTokenFilter(jwtTokenProvider);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; http.addFilterBefore(customFilter, UsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter.class);
&nbsp; &nbsp; }
}

Finally, we have to configure the Spring Security by creating a Java class file inside configs package with the name WebSecurityConfig. Give annotations to this class and extends Spring WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter.

@Configuration
@EnableWebSecurity
public class WebSecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {
}

Inject JWT token provider inside this class.

@Autowired
JwtTokenProvider jwtTokenProvider;

Add an override method to configure Authentication Manager Builder.

@Override
protected void configure(AuthenticationManagerBuilder auth) throws Exception {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;UserDetailsService userDetailsService = mongoUserDetails();
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;auth.userDetailsService(userDetailsService).passwordEncoder(bCryptPasswordEncoder());

}

Next, add an override method to configure Spring Security Http Security.

@Override
protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;http.httpBasic().disable().csrf().disable().sessionManagement()
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;.sessionCreationPolicy(SessionCreationPolicy.STATELESS).and().authorizeRequests()
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;.antMatchers("/api/auth/login").permitAll().antMatchers("/api/auth/register").permitAll()
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;.antMatchers("/api/products/**").hasAuthority("ADMIN").anyRequest().authenticated().and().csrf()
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;.disable().exceptionHandling().authenticationEntryPoint(unauthorizedEntryPoint()).and()
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;.apply(new JwtConfigurer(jwtTokenProvider));
}

Next, declare all required beans for this configuration.

@Bean
public PasswordEncoder bCryptPasswordEncoder() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return new BCryptPasswordEncoder();
}

@Bean
@Override
public AuthenticationManager authenticationManagerBean() throws Exception {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return super.authenticationManagerBean();
}

@Bean
public AuthenticationEntryPoint unauthorizedEntryPoint() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return (request, response, authException) -> response.sendError(HttpServletResponse.SC_UNAUTHORIZED,
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;"Unauthorized");
}

@Bean
public UserDetailsService mongoUserDetails() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return new CustomUserDetailsService();
}

6. Create Product and Authentication Controllers

Now it’s time for REST API endpoint. All RESTful API will be created from each controller. Product controller will handle CRUD endpoint of product and Authentication controller will handle login and register endpoint. Right-click project name -> New -> Class then fill the package with com.djamware.SecurityRest.controllers and the class name as ProductController. Open and edit the newly created class file then replace all codes with these lines of codes.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.controllers;

import java.util.Optional;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.PathVariable;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestBody;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMethod;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;

import com.djamware.SecurityRest.models.Product;
import com.djamware.SecurityRest.repositories.ProductRepository;

@RestController
public class ProductController {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@Autowired
&nbsp; &nbsp; ProductRepository productRepository;

&nbsp; &nbsp; @RequestMapping(method=RequestMethod.GET, value="/api/products")
&nbsp; &nbsp; public Iterable<Product> product() {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return productRepository.findAll();
&nbsp; &nbsp; }

&nbsp; &nbsp; @RequestMapping(method=RequestMethod.POST, value="/api/products")
&nbsp; &nbsp; public String save(@RequestBody Product product) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; productRepository.save(product);

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return product.getId();
&nbsp; &nbsp; }

&nbsp; &nbsp; @RequestMapping(method=RequestMethod.GET, value="/api/products/{id}")
&nbsp; &nbsp; public Optional<Product> show(@PathVariable String id) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return productRepository.findById(id);
&nbsp; &nbsp; }

&nbsp; &nbsp; @RequestMapping(method=RequestMethod.PUT, value="/api/products/{id}")
&nbsp; &nbsp; public Product update(@PathVariable String id, @RequestBody Product product) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;Optional<Product> prod = productRepository.findById(id);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; if(product.getProdName() != null)
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; prod.get().setProdName(product.getProdName());
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; if(product.getProdDesc() != null)
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; prod.get().setProdDesc(product.getProdDesc());
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; if(product.getProdPrice() != null)
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; prod.get().setProdPrice(product.getProdPrice());
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; if(product.getProdImage() != null)
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; prod.get().setProdImage(product.getProdImage());
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; productRepository.save(prod.get());
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return prod.get();
&nbsp; &nbsp; }

&nbsp; &nbsp; @RequestMapping(method=RequestMethod.DELETE, value="/api/products/{id}")
&nbsp; &nbsp; public String delete(@PathVariable String id) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Optional<Product> product = productRepository.findById(id);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; productRepository.delete(product.get());

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return "product deleted";
&nbsp; &nbsp; }
}

For login, we need to create a POJO to mapping required fields of User. Create a new class file with the name AuthBody inside controllers package then replace all Java codes with these lines of codes.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.controllers;

public class AuthBody {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;private String email;
&nbsp; &nbsp; private String password;

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public String getEmail() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return email;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setEmail(String email) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.email = email;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public String getPassword() {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return password;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public void setPassword(String password) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;this.password = password;
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}

}

Finally, create a controller for authentication with the name AuthController inside the controllers’ package. Open and edit that newly created file then replace all Java codes with these lines of codes.

package com.djamware.SecurityRest.controllers;

import static org.springframework.http.ResponseEntity.ok;

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.http.ResponseEntity;
import org.springframework.security.authentication.AuthenticationManager;
import org.springframework.security.authentication.BadCredentialsException;
import org.springframework.security.authentication.UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken;
import org.springframework.security.core.AuthenticationException;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.PostMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestBody;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;

import com.djamware.SecurityRest.configs.JwtTokenProvider;
import com.djamware.SecurityRest.models.User;
import com.djamware.SecurityRest.repositories.UserRepository;
import com.djamware.SecurityRest.services.CustomUserDetailsService;

@RestController
@RequestMapping("/api/auth")
public class AuthController {

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@Autowired
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;AuthenticationManager authenticationManager;

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@Autowired
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;JwtTokenProvider jwtTokenProvider;

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@Autowired
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;UserRepository users;

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@Autowired
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;private CustomUserDetailsService userService;

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@SuppressWarnings("rawtypes")
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@PostMapping("/login")
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public ResponseEntity login(@RequestBody AuthBody data) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;try {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;String username = data.getEmail();
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;authenticationManager.authenticate(new UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken(username, data.getPassword()));
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;String token = jwtTokenProvider.createToken(username, this.users.findByEmail(username).getRoles());
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;Map<Object, Object> model = new HashMap<>();
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;model.put("username", username);
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;model.put("token", token);
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return ok(model);
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;} catch (AuthenticationException e) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;throw new BadCredentialsException("Invalid email/password supplied");
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}

&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@SuppressWarnings("rawtypes")
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;@PostMapping("/register")
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;public ResponseEntity register(@RequestBody User user) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;User userExists = userService.findUserByEmail(user.getEmail());
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;if (userExists != null) {
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;throw new BadCredentialsException("User with username: " + user.getEmail() + " already exists");
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;userService.saveUser(user);
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;Map<Object, Object> model = new HashMap<>();
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;model.put("message", "User registered successfully");
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;return ok(model);
&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;}
}

7. Run and Test Spring Boot Security Rest using Postman

Before run and test the application, we have to populate a Role data first. Open and edit src/main/java/com/djamware/SecurityRest/SecurityRestApplication.java then add these lines of codes inside the initialization method.

@Bean
CommandLineRunner init(RoleRepository roleRepository) {

&nbsp; &nbsp; return args -> {

&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Role adminRole = roleRepository.findByRole("ADMIN");
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; if (adminRole == null) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Role newAdminRole = new Role();
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; newAdminRole.setRole("ADMIN");
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; roleRepository.save(newAdminRole);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; }
&nbsp; &nbsp; };

}

Next, make sure you have run the MongoDB server on your local machine then run the Gradle application using this command.

./gradlew bootRun

Or in STS just right-click the project name -> Run As -> Spring Boot App. Next, open the Postman application then change the method to GET and address to localhost:8080/api/products then click Send button.

You will see this response in the bottom panel of Postman.

{
&nbsp; &nbsp; "timestamp": "2019-03-07T13:16:34.935+0000",
&nbsp; &nbsp; "status": 401,
&nbsp; &nbsp; "error": "Unauthorized",
&nbsp; &nbsp; "message": "Unauthorized",
&nbsp; &nbsp; "path": "/api/products"
}

Next, change the method to POST then address to localhost:8080/api/auth/register then fill the body with raw data as below image then click Send button.

You will get the response in the bottom panel of Postman.

{
&nbsp; &nbsp; "message": "User registered successfully"
}

Next, change the address to localhost:8080/api/auth/login and change the body as below then click Send button.

{ "email":"[email&nbsp;protected]", "password": "q1w2we3r4" }

You will see this response in the bottom panel of Postman.

{
&nbsp; &nbsp; "username": "[email&nbsp;protected]",
&nbsp; &nbsp; "token": "eyJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJzdWIiOiJpbmZvQGRqYW13YXJlLmNvbSIsInJvbGVzIjpbeyJpZCI6IjVjODBjNjIzYjIwMTkxNGIyYTY5N2U4ZCIsInJvbGUiOiJBRE1JTiJ9XSwiaWF0IjoxNTUxOTY0OTc3LCJleHAiOjE1NTE5Njg1Nzd9.j5CHZ_LCmeQtdxQeH9eluxVXcOsHPWV1p8WnBn0CULo"
}

Copy the token then back to the GET product. Add a header with the name Authorization and the value that paste from a token that gets by login with additional Bearer prefix (with space) as below.

Bearer eyJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJzdWIiOiJpbmZvQGRqYW13YXJlLmNvbSIsInJvbGVzIjpbeyJpZCI6IjVjODBjNjIzYjIwMTkxNGIyYTY5N2U4ZCIsInJvbGUiOiJBRE1JTiJ9XSwiaWF0IjoxNTUxOTY0OTc3LCJleHAiOjE1NTE5Njg1Nzd9.j5CHZ_LCmeQtdxQeH9eluxVXcOsHPWV1p8WnBn0CULo

You should see this response after clicking the Send button.

[
&nbsp; &nbsp; {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; "id": "5c80dc6cb20191520567b68a",
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; "prodName": "Dummy Product 1",
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; "prodDesc": "The Fresh Dummy Product in The world part 1",
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; "prodPrice": 100,
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; "prodImage": "https://dummyimage.com/600x400/000/fff"
&nbsp; &nbsp; }
]

You can test the POST product with the token in headers using the same way.

That it’s, the Securing RESTful API with Spring Boot, Security, and Data MongoDB tutorial. You can get the full source code from our GitHub.

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#java #springboot #security #mongodb #database #rest #api

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Securing RESTful API with Spring Boot, Security, and Data MongoDB

Aashik Ahamed

1552844014

Can you put the image of raw data for localhost:8080/api/auth/register POST?

Maryse  Reinger

Maryse Reinger

1625802780

Spring Data MongoDB Delete Operation |Spring Boot+Spring Data MongoDb+MongoTemplate Delete

Spring Data MongoDB - Delete document | Spring Data MongoDB Delete Operation | Spring Boot MongoDB Delete

Hello and namaste everyone,

Today, we are learning how to delete a document in spring data mongodb. We are using mongoTemplate to delete the document. Spring Data MongoDB provides different functions to delete the document. we will understand the difference between these functions and their usage.

#springDataMongoDb #springDataMongodbDelete #mongoTemplate #springBooot #javaMongodb #smartyetchFizz

Email at: smartytechfizz@gmail.om
Follow on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/smartytechfizz/

#spring data mongodb #mongodb #spring boot #spring data mongodb #mongotemplate delete

Top 10 API Security Threats Every API Team Should Know

As more and more data is exposed via APIs either as API-first companies or for the explosion of single page apps/JAMStack, API security can no longer be an afterthought. The hard part about APIs is that it provides direct access to large amounts of data while bypassing browser precautions. Instead of worrying about SQL injection and XSS issues, you should be concerned about the bad actor who was able to paginate through all your customer records and their data.

Typical prevention mechanisms like Captchas and browser fingerprinting won’t work since APIs by design need to handle a very large number of API accesses even by a single customer. So where do you start? The first thing is to put yourself in the shoes of a hacker and then instrument your APIs to detect and block common attacks along with unknown unknowns for zero-day exploits. Some of these are on the OWASP Security API list, but not all.

Insecure pagination and resource limits

Most APIs provide access to resources that are lists of entities such as /users or /widgets. A client such as a browser would typically filter and paginate through this list to limit the number items returned to a client like so:

First Call: GET /items?skip=0&take=10 
Second Call: GET /items?skip=10&take=10

However, if that entity has any PII or other information, then a hacker could scrape that endpoint to get a dump of all entities in your database. This could be most dangerous if those entities accidently exposed PII or other sensitive information, but could also be dangerous in providing competitors or others with adoption and usage stats for your business or provide scammers with a way to get large email lists. See how Venmo data was scraped

A naive protection mechanism would be to check the take count and throw an error if greater than 100 or 1000. The problem with this is two-fold:

  1. For data APIs, legitimate customers may need to fetch and sync a large number of records such as via cron jobs. Artificially small pagination limits can force your API to be very chatty decreasing overall throughput. Max limits are to ensure memory and scalability requirements are met (and prevent certain DDoS attacks), not to guarantee security.
  2. This offers zero protection to a hacker that writes a simple script that sleeps a random delay between repeated accesses.
skip = 0
while True:    response = requests.post('https://api.acmeinc.com/widgets?take=10&skip=' + skip),                      headers={'Authorization': 'Bearer' + ' ' + sys.argv[1]})    print("Fetched 10 items")    sleep(randint(100,1000))    skip += 10

How to secure against pagination attacks

To secure against pagination attacks, you should track how many items of a single resource are accessed within a certain time period for each user or API key rather than just at the request level. By tracking API resource access at the user level, you can block a user or API key once they hit a threshold such as “touched 1,000,000 items in a one hour period”. This is dependent on your API use case and can even be dependent on their subscription with you. Like a Captcha, this can slow down the speed that a hacker can exploit your API, like a Captcha if they have to create a new user account manually to create a new API key.

Insecure API key generation

Most APIs are protected by some sort of API key or JWT (JSON Web Token). This provides a natural way to track and protect your API as API security tools can detect abnormal API behavior and block access to an API key automatically. However, hackers will want to outsmart these mechanisms by generating and using a large pool of API keys from a large number of users just like a web hacker would use a large pool of IP addresses to circumvent DDoS protection.

How to secure against API key pools

The easiest way to secure against these types of attacks is by requiring a human to sign up for your service and generate API keys. Bot traffic can be prevented with things like Captcha and 2-Factor Authentication. Unless there is a legitimate business case, new users who sign up for your service should not have the ability to generate API keys programmatically. Instead, only trusted customers should have the ability to generate API keys programmatically. Go one step further and ensure any anomaly detection for abnormal behavior is done at the user and account level, not just for each API key.

Accidental key exposure

APIs are used in a way that increases the probability credentials are leaked:

  1. APIs are expected to be accessed over indefinite time periods, which increases the probability that a hacker obtains a valid API key that’s not expired. You save that API key in a server environment variable and forget about it. This is a drastic contrast to a user logging into an interactive website where the session expires after a short duration.
  2. The consumer of an API has direct access to the credentials such as when debugging via Postman or CURL. It only takes a single developer to accidently copy/pastes the CURL command containing the API key into a public forum like in GitHub Issues or Stack Overflow.
  3. API keys are usually bearer tokens without requiring any other identifying information. APIs cannot leverage things like one-time use tokens or 2-factor authentication.

If a key is exposed due to user error, one may think you as the API provider has any blame. However, security is all about reducing surface area and risk. Treat your customer data as if it’s your own and help them by adding guards that prevent accidental key exposure.

How to prevent accidental key exposure

The easiest way to prevent key exposure is by leveraging two tokens rather than one. A refresh token is stored as an environment variable and can only be used to generate short lived access tokens. Unlike the refresh token, these short lived tokens can access the resources, but are time limited such as in hours or days.

The customer will store the refresh token with other API keys. Then your SDK will generate access tokens on SDK init or when the last access token expires. If a CURL command gets pasted into a GitHub issue, then a hacker would need to use it within hours reducing the attack vector (unless it was the actual refresh token which is low probability)

Exposure to DDoS attacks

APIs open up entirely new business models where customers can access your API platform programmatically. However, this can make DDoS protection tricky. Most DDoS protection is designed to absorb and reject a large number of requests from bad actors during DDoS attacks but still need to let the good ones through. This requires fingerprinting the HTTP requests to check against what looks like bot traffic. This is much harder for API products as all traffic looks like bot traffic and is not coming from a browser where things like cookies are present.

Stopping DDoS attacks

The magical part about APIs is almost every access requires an API Key. If a request doesn’t have an API key, you can automatically reject it which is lightweight on your servers (Ensure authentication is short circuited very early before later middleware like request JSON parsing). So then how do you handle authenticated requests? The easiest is to leverage rate limit counters for each API key such as to handle X requests per minute and reject those above the threshold with a 429 HTTP response. There are a variety of algorithms to do this such as leaky bucket and fixed window counters.

Incorrect server security

APIs are no different than web servers when it comes to good server hygiene. Data can be leaked due to misconfigured SSL certificate or allowing non-HTTPS traffic. For modern applications, there is very little reason to accept non-HTTPS requests, but a customer could mistakenly issue a non HTTP request from their application or CURL exposing the API key. APIs do not have the protection of a browser so things like HSTS or redirect to HTTPS offer no protection.

How to ensure proper SSL

Test your SSL implementation over at Qualys SSL Test or similar tool. You should also block all non-HTTP requests which can be done within your load balancer. You should also remove any HTTP headers scrub any error messages that leak implementation details. If your API is used only by your own apps or can only be accessed server-side, then review Authoritative guide to Cross-Origin Resource Sharing for REST APIs

Incorrect caching headers

APIs provide access to dynamic data that’s scoped to each API key. Any caching implementation should have the ability to scope to an API key to prevent cross-pollution. Even if you don’t cache anything in your infrastructure, you could expose your customers to security holes. If a customer with a proxy server was using multiple API keys such as one for development and one for production, then they could see cross-pollinated data.

#api management #api security #api best practices #api providers #security analytics #api management policies #api access tokens #api access #api security risks #api access keys

Wilford  Pagac

Wilford Pagac

1594289280

What is REST API? An Overview | Liquid Web

What is REST?

The REST acronym is defined as a “REpresentational State Transfer” and is designed to take advantage of existing HTTP protocols when used for Web APIs. It is very flexible in that it is not tied to resources or methods and has the ability to handle different calls and data formats. Because REST API is not constrained to an XML format like SOAP, it can return multiple other formats depending on what is needed. If a service adheres to this style, it is considered a “RESTful” application. REST allows components to access and manage functions within another application.

REST was initially defined in a dissertation by Roy Fielding’s twenty years ago. He proposed these standards as an alternative to SOAP (The Simple Object Access Protocol is a simple standard for accessing objects and exchanging structured messages within a distributed computing environment). REST (or RESTful) defines the general rules used to regulate the interactions between web apps utilizing the HTTP protocol for CRUD (create, retrieve, update, delete) operations.

What is an API?

An API (or Application Programming Interface) provides a method of interaction between two systems.

What is a RESTful API?

A RESTful API (or application program interface) uses HTTP requests to GET, PUT, POST, and DELETE data following the REST standards. This allows two pieces of software to communicate with each other. In essence, REST API is a set of remote calls using standard methods to return data in a specific format.

The systems that interact in this manner can be very different. Each app may use a unique programming language, operating system, database, etc. So, how do we create a system that can easily communicate and understand other apps?? This is where the Rest API is used as an interaction system.

When using a RESTful API, we should determine in advance what resources we want to expose to the outside world. Typically, the RESTful API service is implemented, keeping the following ideas in mind:

  • Format: There should be no restrictions on the data exchange format
  • Implementation: REST is based entirely on HTTP
  • Service Definition: Because REST is very flexible, API can be modified to ensure the application understands the request/response format.
  • The RESTful API focuses on resources and how efficiently you perform operations with it using HTTP.

The features of the REST API design style state:

  • Each entity must have a unique identifier.
  • Standard methods should be used to read and modify data.
  • It should provide support for different types of resources.
  • The interactions should be stateless.

For REST to fit this model, we must adhere to the following rules:

  • Client-Server Architecture: The interface is separate from the server-side data repository. This affords flexibility and the development of components independently of each other.
  • Detachment: The client connections are not stored on the server between requests.
  • Cacheability: It must be explicitly stated whether the client can store responses.
  • Multi-level: The API should work whether it interacts directly with a server or through an additional layer, like a load balancer.

#tutorials #api #application #application programming interface #crud #http #json #programming #protocols #representational state transfer #rest #rest api #rest api graphql #rest api json #rest api xml #restful #soap #xml #yaml

Quartz Scheduler using Rest API with Spring Boot and MongoDB

This article demonstrates how to implement and manage Quartz Scheduler using Rest API with Spring Boot and MongoDB

Introduction

Quartz is a job scheduling library that can be integrated into a wide variety of Java applications. Quartz is generally used for enterprise-class applications to support process workflow, system management actions and to provide timely services within the applications And quartz supports clustering.

MongoDB is a cross-platform document-oriented database program. Classified as a NoSQL database program, MongoDB uses JSON-like documents with optional schemas. MongoDB is developed by MongoDB Inc. and licensed under the Server Side Public License.

#spring-boot #quartz #quartz-scheduler #rest-api #mongodb #quartz scheduler using rest api with spring boot and mongodb

An API-First Approach For Designing Restful APIs | Hacker Noon

I’ve been working with Restful APIs for some time now and one thing that I love to do is to talk about APIs.

So, today I will show you how to build an API using the API-First approach and Design First with OpenAPI Specification.

First thing first, if you don’t know what’s an API-First approach means, it would be nice you stop reading this and check the blog post that I wrote to the Farfetchs blog where I explain everything that you need to know to start an API using API-First.

Preparing the ground

Before you get your hands dirty, let’s prepare the ground and understand the use case that will be developed.

Tools

If you desire to reproduce the examples that will be shown here, you will need some of those items below.

  • NodeJS
  • OpenAPI Specification
  • Text Editor (I’ll use VSCode)
  • Command Line

Use Case

To keep easy to understand, let’s use the Todo List App, it is a very common concept beyond the software development community.

#api #rest-api #openai #api-first-development #api-design #apis #restful-apis #restful-api