Fredy  Larson

Fredy Larson

1599098100

Open Service Mesh: a Service Mesh Implementation from Microsoft

Microsoft has released open service mesh (OSM), an alpha service mesh implementation compliant with the SMI specification. OSM covers standard features of a service mesh like canary releases, secure communication, and application insights, similar to other service mesh implementations like Istio, Linkerd, or Consul. Additionally, the OSM team is in the process of donating the project to the CNCF.

OSM is a new option in the service mesh space and other similar projects like Istio, Linkerd, Consul, or Kuma. OSM is a service mesh open-source project initiated by Microsoft. It’s implementing the service mesh interface (SMI), a set of standard and portable APIs to deploy a service mesh in Kubernetes. When users configure a service mesh through SMI specification, they don’t need to be specific about which service implementation they’re running in the cluster.

Additionally, OSM comes with standard and basic service mesh features like canary releases, secure service communication, and application insights. In this alpha release, OSM comes with the ability to configure traffic shifting policies, secure communication within services through mTLS, grained access control policies, application metrics, external certificate managers, and inject the sidecar Envoy proxy automatically. Moreover, similar to other projects like Istio, OSM uses Envoy as a sidecar proxy for communicating with other services in the mesh. However, in the OSM project repository, they mention that any xDS (service discovery protocol) compatible reverse-proxy might be used or to use advanced Envoy features.

When a user creates a pod, OSM intercepts the API through a mutate webhook to inject the Envoy sidecar proxy, and an init container uses iptables to ensure that all the traffic flows through Envoy. OSM handles access control rules, routing policies, encrypts communication, and collects metrics that, by default, can be seen in Grafana and Zipkin. Users can find more details about each of the architecture components of OSM on the project’s design page. But at a high level, the below image represents the OSM components and interactions:

#service mesh #microservices #grafana #open source #cloud native computing foundation #kubernetes #microsoft #envoy #devops #architecture & design #development #news

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Open Service Mesh: a Service Mesh Implementation from Microsoft
Fannie  Zemlak

Fannie Zemlak

1597494060

Open Service Mesh — Microsoft’s SMI based Open Source Service Mesh Implementation

Microsoft’s Open Service Mesh is an SMI-compliant, lightweight service mesh being run as an open source project. Backed by service-mesh partners including HashiCorp, Solo.io, and Buoyant, Microsoft introduced the Service Mesh Interface last year with the goal of helping end users and software vendors work with the myriad choices presented by service mesh technology by providing a set of specification standards. OSM can be considered as a reference implementation of SMI, one that builds on existing service mesh components and concepts.

Open Service Mesh data plane is architecturally based on the Envoy proxy and implements the go-control-plane xDS v3 API. However, despite the fact that Envoy comes with OSM by default, using standard interfaces allows it to be integrated with other reverse proxies (compatible with xDS).

SMI follows in the footsteps of existing Kubernetes resources, like Ingress and Network Policy, which also do not provide an implementation where required interfaces to interact with Kubernetes are facilitated for providers to plug their products. The SMI specification instead defines a set of common APIs that allow mesh providers to deliver their own implementations. This means mesh providers can either use SMI APIs directly or build operators to translate SMI to native APIs.

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SMI Implementation

With OSM, users can use SMI and Envoy on Kubernetes and get a simplified service-mesh implementation. The SMI ecosystem already has multiple providers like Istio, Linkerd, Consul Connect, now Open Service Mesh etc. some of them have implemented SMI compatibility using adaptors (Istio, Consul Connect) and others (OSM, Linkerd etc.) consume the SMI APIs directly.

OSM implementation is very similar to Linkerd which also directly consumes SMI APIs without any need for an adaptor like Istio, but one key difference is that OSM uses Envoy for its proxy and communication bus, whereas Linkerd uses linkerd2-proxy (rust based — lighter than Envoy).

Architecture & Components

OSM control plane comprise four core components. All these four components are implemented as a single controller entity (Kubernetes pod/deployment), this is much lighter in weight when compared with older versions of Istio where there are 4 control plane components (Istio-1.6 introduced istiod which unifies all the control plane components into one binary).

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OSM Architecture — Components

OSM Data Plane — Uses Envoy as reverse-proxy by default — similar to most other Service Mesh providers (Linkerd is unique in this case which uses ultralight transparent proxy written in Rust). While by default OSM ships with Envoy, the design utilizes interfaces (An interface type in Go is kind of definition. It defines and describes the exact methods that some other type must have), which enable integrations with any xDS compatible reverse-proxy. The dynamic configuration of all the proxies is handled by OSM controller using Envoy xDS go-control-plane.

#service-mesh #istio-service-mesh #kubernetes #azure #microsoft

Fredy  Larson

Fredy Larson

1599098100

Open Service Mesh: a Service Mesh Implementation from Microsoft

Microsoft has released open service mesh (OSM), an alpha service mesh implementation compliant with the SMI specification. OSM covers standard features of a service mesh like canary releases, secure communication, and application insights, similar to other service mesh implementations like Istio, Linkerd, or Consul. Additionally, the OSM team is in the process of donating the project to the CNCF.

OSM is a new option in the service mesh space and other similar projects like Istio, Linkerd, Consul, or Kuma. OSM is a service mesh open-source project initiated by Microsoft. It’s implementing the service mesh interface (SMI), a set of standard and portable APIs to deploy a service mesh in Kubernetes. When users configure a service mesh through SMI specification, they don’t need to be specific about which service implementation they’re running in the cluster.

Additionally, OSM comes with standard and basic service mesh features like canary releases, secure service communication, and application insights. In this alpha release, OSM comes with the ability to configure traffic shifting policies, secure communication within services through mTLS, grained access control policies, application metrics, external certificate managers, and inject the sidecar Envoy proxy automatically. Moreover, similar to other projects like Istio, OSM uses Envoy as a sidecar proxy for communicating with other services in the mesh. However, in the OSM project repository, they mention that any xDS (service discovery protocol) compatible reverse-proxy might be used or to use advanced Envoy features.

When a user creates a pod, OSM intercepts the API through a mutate webhook to inject the Envoy sidecar proxy, and an init container uses iptables to ensure that all the traffic flows through Envoy. OSM handles access control rules, routing policies, encrypts communication, and collects metrics that, by default, can be seen in Grafana and Zipkin. Users can find more details about each of the architecture components of OSM on the project’s design page. But at a high level, the below image represents the OSM components and interactions:

#service mesh #microservices #grafana #open source #cloud native computing foundation #kubernetes #microsoft #envoy #devops #architecture & design #development #news

Roberta  Ward

Roberta Ward

1598169240

From Service Mess to Service Mesh

Introduction

Over the last 10 years, the rapid adoption of microservices architecture has resulted in enterprises with hundreds or (sometimes even thousands) of services. With the growth of containerization technologies like Docker and Kubernetes, microservice patterns have seen the strongest growth; resulting in a complex dependency matrix between these micro-services. For teams to monitor, support, and to maintain these services is becoming a challenge so most enterprises have invested in some kind of microservices management tool.

This article will explore some of the common aspects of microservice management. Then we’ll take a closer look at the centralized gateway pattern, as well as its limitations (most enterprises have started with or currently still use this pattern). Then we will look into a new pattern called “Service Mesh” which has gained a lot of attention in the last 3–4 years. Often this pattern is also referred to as the “Side Car Proxy”. So lets get started!

Micro-Services Management

As enterprises start building more and more microservices, it’s becoming clear that some of the aspects of microservices are common across all microservices. So it makes sense to provide a common platform for managing these common aspects. Below are some of the key common aspects:

Service Registration and Discovery: A commonplace to register, document, search and discover microservices

Service Version Management: Ability to run multiple versions of a microservice.

**Authentication and Authorization: **Handle authentication and authorization including Mutual TLS (MTLS) between services.

Service Observability: Ability to monitor end to end traffic between services, response times, and quickly identify failures and bottlenecks.

**Rate Limiting: **Define threshold limits that traffic services can handle.

Circuit Breaker: Ability to configure and introduce a circuit breaker in case of failure scenarios (to avoid flooding downstream services with requests).

**Retry Logic: **Ability to configure and introduce retry logic dynamically in services.

So it’s a good idea to build these concerns as part of a common framework or service management tool. As a result, micro-service development teams don’t have to build these aspects in the service itself.

#service-mesh #istio-service-mesh #microservices #gateway-service #envoy-proxy

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