How To Deploy Containers to Azure ACI using Docker CLI and Compose

Running containers in the cloud can be hard and confusing. There are so many options to choose from and then understanding how all the different clouds work from virtual networks to security. Not to mention orchestrators. It’s a learning curve to say the least.

At Docker we are making the Developer Experience (DX) more simple. As an extension of that we want to provide the same beloved Docker experience that developers use daily and integrate it with the cloud. Microsoft’s Azure ACI provided an awesome platform to do just that.

In this tutorial, we take a look at running single containers and multiple containers with Compose in Azure ACI. We’ll walk you through setting up your docker context and even simplifying logging into Azure. At the end of this tutorial, you will be able to use familiar Docker commands to deploy your applications into your own Azure ACI account.

Prerequisites

To complete this tutorial, you will need:

Run Docker Container on ACI

The integration with Azure ACI is very similar to working with local containers. The development teams have thought very deeply about the developer experience and have tried to make the UX for working with ACI as close as possible to working with local containers.

Let’s run a simple Nginx web server on Azure ACI.

Log into Azure

You do not need to have the Azure CLI installed on your machine to run Docker images in ACI. Docker takes care of everything.

The first thing you need to do is to login to Azure.

$ docker login azure

This will open a browser window which will allow you to login to Azure.

Select your account and login. Once you are logged in, you can close the browser window.

#engineering #aci #azure #containers #docker #microsoft

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How To Deploy Containers to Azure ACI using Docker CLI and Compose

How To Deploy Containers to Azure ACI using Docker CLI and Compose

Running containers in the cloud can be hard and confusing. There are so many options to choose from and then understanding how all the different clouds work from virtual networks to security. Not to mention orchestrators. It’s a learning curve to say the least.

At Docker we are making the Developer Experience (DX) more simple. As an extension of that we want to provide the same beloved Docker experience that developers use daily and integrate it with the cloud. Microsoft’s Azure ACI provided an awesome platform to do just that.

In this tutorial, we take a look at running single containers and multiple containers with Compose in Azure ACI. We’ll walk you through setting up your docker context and even simplifying logging into Azure. At the end of this tutorial, you will be able to use familiar Docker commands to deploy your applications into your own Azure ACI account.

Prerequisites

To complete this tutorial, you will need:

Run Docker Container on ACI

The integration with Azure ACI is very similar to working with local containers. The development teams have thought very deeply about the developer experience and have tried to make the UX for working with ACI as close as possible to working with local containers.

Let’s run a simple Nginx web server on Azure ACI.

Log into Azure

You do not need to have the Azure CLI installed on your machine to run Docker images in ACI. Docker takes care of everything.

The first thing you need to do is to login to Azure.

$ docker login azure

This will open a browser window which will allow you to login to Azure.

Select your account and login. Once you are logged in, you can close the browser window.

#engineering #aci #azure #containers #docker #microsoft

Christa  Stehr

Christa Stehr

1602964260

50+ Useful Kubernetes Tools for 2020 - Part 2

Introduction

Last year, we provided a list of Kubernetes tools that proved so popular we have decided to curate another list of some useful additions for working with the platform—among which are many tools that we personally use here at Caylent. Check out the original tools list here in case you missed it.

According to a recent survey done by Stackrox, the dominance Kubernetes enjoys in the market continues to be reinforced, with 86% of respondents using it for container orchestration.

(State of Kubernetes and Container Security, 2020)

And as you can see below, more and more companies are jumping into containerization for their apps. If you’re among them, here are some tools to aid you going forward as Kubernetes continues its rapid growth.

(State of Kubernetes and Container Security, 2020)

#blog #tools #amazon elastic kubernetes service #application security #aws kms #botkube #caylent #cli #container monitoring #container orchestration tools #container security #containers #continuous delivery #continuous deployment #continuous integration #contour #developers #development #developments #draft #eksctl #firewall #gcp #github #harbor #helm #helm charts #helm-2to3 #helm-aws-secret-plugin #helm-docs #helm-operator-get-started #helm-secrets #iam #json #k-rail #k3s #k3sup #k8s #keel.sh #keycloak #kiali #kiam #klum #knative #krew #ksniff #kube #kube-prod-runtime #kube-ps1 #kube-scan #kube-state-metrics #kube2iam #kubeapps #kubebuilder #kubeconfig #kubectl #kubectl-aws-secrets #kubefwd #kubernetes #kubernetes command line tool #kubernetes configuration #kubernetes deployment #kubernetes in development #kubernetes in production #kubernetes ingress #kubernetes interfaces #kubernetes monitoring #kubernetes networking #kubernetes observability #kubernetes plugins #kubernetes secrets #kubernetes security #kubernetes security best practices #kubernetes security vendors #kubernetes service discovery #kubernetic #kubesec #kubeterminal #kubeval #kudo #kuma #microsoft azure key vault #mozilla sops #octant #octarine #open source #palo alto kubernetes security #permission-manager #pgp #rafay #rakess #rancher #rook #secrets operations #serverless function #service mesh #shell-operator #snyk #snyk container #sonobuoy #strongdm #tcpdump #tenkai #testing #tigera #tilt #vert.x #wireshark #yaml

Mikel  Okuneva

Mikel Okuneva

1602317778

Ever Wondered Why We Use Containers In DevOps?

At some point we’ve all said the words, “But it works on my machine.” It usually happens during testing or when you’re trying to get a new project set up. Sometimes it happens when you pull down changes from an updated branch.

Every machine has different underlying states depending on the operating system, other installed programs, and permissions. Getting a project to run locally could take hours or even days because of weird system issues.

The worst part is that this can also happen in production. If the server is configured differently than what you’re running locally, your changes might not work as you expect and cause problems for users. There’s a way around all of these common issues using containers.

What is a container

A container is a piece of software that packages code and its dependencies so that the application can run in any computing environment. They basically create a little unit that you can put on any operating system and reliably and consistently run the application. You don’t have to worry about any of those underlying system issues creeping in later.

Although containers were already used in Linux for years, they became more popular in recent years. Most of the time when people are talking about containers, they’re referring to Docker containers. These containers are built from images that include all of the dependencies needed to run an application.

When you think of containers, virtual machines might also come to mind. They are very similar, but the big difference is that containers virtualize the operating system instead of the hardware. That’s what makes them so easy to run on all of the operating systems consistently.

What containers have to do with DevOps

Since we know how odd happenings occur when you move code from one computing environment to another, this is also a common issue with moving code to the different environments in our DevOps process. You don’t want to have to deal with system differences between staging and production. That would require more work than it should.

Once you have an artifact built, you should be able to use it in any environment from local to production. That’s the reason we use containers in DevOps. It’s also invaluable when you’re working with microservices. Docker containers used with something like Kubernetes will make it easier for you to handle larger systems with more moving pieces.

#devops #containers #containers-devops #devops-containers #devops-tools #devops-docker #docker #docker-image

Nat  Kutch

Nat Kutch

1595494260

NET Core app using Docker, Azure DevOps, Azure Container Registry

This is a guide on how to use Azure DevOps to build and then publish a docker image as an Azure App Service, using Azure Container Registry.

Prerequisites

This guide assumes basic knowledge in Docker and more specifically how to create a Dockerfile. This docker cheat sheet provides a ready Dockerfile with explanations, plus an easy way to create your own Dockerfile from within Visual Studio. The guide also requires an account on Azure and Azure DevOps. The code is hosted in Azure DevOps, but almost any -accessible from Azure DevOps- version control system will do.

In the process that follows, we setup three things mainly; An Azure Container Registry to hold the Docker Image, an Azure DevOps Pipeline to build and push the image to the registry, and and Azure App Service that will continuously pull the image from the registry.

Steps to setup Azure Container Registry

In order to setup an Azure Container Registry, you will of course need to visit portal.azure.com first. After signing in, follow the next three steps to setup and configure Azure Container Registry correctly:

Step 1

Use the convenient search bar on top to search for “Container Registry“. Once the results are in, click on the left side on the “Container Registry” result, as shown here:

Azure Container Registry - Search

Step 2

Once you clicked on the correct result, the “Create Container Registry” form will appear and a few selections have to be made. The minimum changes required here, are to select the Subscription and Resource group you wish (you can also create a new recourse), and to write the Registry name you prefer. Change the Location and SKU if needed and click Create once done.

Azure Container Registry - Create

The Registry name is part of the Login Server for your Azure Container Registry. In this example it will be registryaspnetcoredockerdemo.azurecr.io.

Step 3

Enable the Admin user for this Container Registry. Although the admin account is designed for a single user to access the registry, mainly for testing purposes, in order to be able to use the current registry from an App Service and select image source and Continuous Deployment, the Admin user must be enabled. Find this resource and go to Access Keys to enable the Admin user, as shown below:

Azure Container Registry - Enable Admin User

Read more information about the Admin Account in Microsoft Docs

#azure #docker #azure app service #azure devops #devops

Compose CLI ACI Integration Now Available

Today we are pleased to announce that we have reached a major milestone, reaching GA and our V1 of both the Compose CLI and the ACI integration.

In May we announced the partnership between Docker and Microsoft to make it easier to deploy containerized applications from the Desktop to the cloud with Azure Container Instances (ACI). We are happy to let you know that all users of Docker Desktop now have the ACI experience available to them by default, allowing them to easily use existing Docker commands to deploy and manage containers running in ACI.

As part of this I want to also call out a thank you to the MSFT team who have worked with us to make this all happen! That is a big thank you to Mike Morton, Karol Zadora-Przylecki, Brandon Waterloo, MacKenzie Olson, and Paul Yuknewicz.

**Getting started with Docker and ACI **

As a new starter, to get going all you will need to do is upgrade your existing Docker Desktop to the latest stable version (2.5.0.0 or later), store your image on Docker Hub so you can deploy it (you can get started with Hub here) and then lastly you will need to create an ACI context to deploy it to.

We have done a few blog posts now on the different types of things you can achieve with the ACI integration.

If you have other questions on the experience or would like some other guides then drop us a message in the Compose CLI repo so we can update our docs.

**What’s new in V1.0 **

Since the last release of the CLI we have added a few new commands to make it easier to manage your working environment and also make it simpler for you to understand what you can clear up to save you money on resources you are not using.

To start we have add a volume inspect command alongside the volume create to allow you better management of your volumes:

We are also very excited by our new top level prune command to allow you to better clear up your ACI working environment and manage your costs.

docker prune --help

We have also added in a couple of interesting flags in here, we have the —dry-run flag to let you see what would be cleared up:

(OK I am not running a great deal here!)

As you can see, this also lets you know the amount of compute resources you will be reclamining as well. At the end of a development session being able to do a force prune allows you to remove ‘all the things you have run’, giving you the confidence you won’t have left something running and get an unexpected bill.

Lastly we have started to add a few more flags in based on your feedback, a couple of examples of these are the addition of the --format json and --quiet in commands ps, context ls, compose ls, compose ps, volume ls to output json or single IDs.

We are really excited about the new experience we have built with ACI, if you have any feedback on the experience or have ideas for other backends for the Compose CLI please let us know via our Public Roadmap

The Original Article can be found on docker.com

#Products #ACI #Compose #containers #docker #Microsoft