5 Simple Tips to Write Better Arrow Functions

The arrow function deserves the popularity. Its syntax is concise, binds this lexically, fits great as a callback.
In this post, you’ll read 5 best practices to get even more benefits from the arrow functions.

#functional-programming #web-development #coding #programming #javascript

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5 Simple Tips to Write Better Arrow Functions
Vincent Lab

Vincent Lab

1605017502

The Difference Between Regular Functions and Arrow Functions in JavaScript

Other then the syntactical differences. The main difference is the way the this keyword behaves? In an arrow function, the this keyword remains the same throughout the life-cycle of the function and is always bound to the value of this in the closest non-arrow parent function. Arrow functions can never be constructor functions so they can never be invoked with the new keyword. And they can never have duplicate named parameters like a regular function not using strict mode.

Here are a few code examples to show you some of the differences
this.name = "Bob";

const person = {
name: “Jon”,

<span style="color: #008000">// Regular function</span>
func1: <span style="color: #0000ff">function</span> () {
    console.log(<span style="color: #0000ff">this</span>);
},

<span style="color: #008000">// Arrow function</span>
func2: () =&gt; {
    console.log(<span style="color: #0000ff">this</span>);
}

}

person.func1(); // Call the Regular function
// Output: {name:“Jon”, func1:[Function: func1], func2:[Function: func2]}

person.func2(); // Call the Arrow function
// Output: {name:“Bob”}

The new keyword with an arrow function
const person = (name) => console.log("Your name is " + name);
const bob = new person("Bob");
// Uncaught TypeError: person is not a constructor

If you want to see a visual presentation on the differences, then you can see the video below:

#arrow functions #javascript #regular functions #arrow functions vs normal functions #difference between functions and arrow functions

Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1619518440

top 30 Python Tips and Tricks for Beginners

Welcome to my Blog , In this article, you are going to learn the top 10 python tips and tricks.

1) swap two numbers.

2) Reversing a string in Python.

3) Create a single string from all the elements in list.

4) Chaining Of Comparison Operators.

5) Print The File Path Of Imported Modules.

6) Return Multiple Values From Functions.

7) Find The Most Frequent Value In A List.

8) Check The Memory Usage Of An Object.

#python #python hacks tricks #python learning tips #python programming tricks #python tips #python tips and tricks #python tips and tricks advanced #python tips and tricks for beginners #python tips tricks and techniques #python tutorial #tips and tricks in python #tips to learn python #top 30 python tips and tricks for beginners

What You Can Learn about Setting from Classic Sitcoms

Giving your novel a strong sense of place is vital to doing your part to engage the readers without confusing or frustrating them. Setting is a big part of this (though not the whole enchilada — there is also social context and historic period), and I often find writing students and consulting clients erring on one of two extremes.

**Either: **Every scene is set in a different, elaborately-described place from the last. This leads to confusion (and possibly exhaustion and impatience) for the reader, because they have no sense of what they need to actually pay attention to for later and what’s just…there. Are the details of that forest in chapter 2 important? Will I ever be back in this castle again? Is there a reason for this character to be in this particular room versus the one she was in the last time I saw her? Who knows!

Or: There are few or no clues at all as to where the characters are in a scene. What’s in the room? Are they even in a room? Are there other people in th — ope, yes, there are, someone just materialized, what is happening? This all leads to the dreaded “brains in jars” syndrome. That is, characters are only their thoughts and words, with no grounding in the space-time continuum. No one seems to be in a place, in a body, at a time of day.

Everything aspect of writing a novel comes with its difficulties, and there are a lot of moving pieces to manage and deploy in the right balance. When you’re a newer writer, especially, there’s something to be said for keeping things simple until you have a handle on how to manage the arc and scope of a novel-length work. And whether you tend to overdo settings or underdo them, you can learn something from TV, especially classic sitcoms.

Your basic “live studio audience” sitcoms are performed and filmed on sets built inside studios vs. on location. This helps keep production expenses in check and helps the viewer feel at home — there’s a reliable and familiar container to hold the story of any given episode. The writers on the show don’t have to reinvent the wheel with every script.

Often, a show will have no more than two or three basic sets that are used episode to episode, and then a few other easily-understood sets (characters’ workplaces, restaurants, streets scenes) are also used regularly but not every episode.

#creative-writing #writing-exercise #writing-craft #writing #writing-tips #machine learning

5 Simple Tips to Write Better Arrow Functions

The arrow function deserves the popularity. Its syntax is concise, binds this lexically, fits great as a callback.
In this post, you’ll read 5 best practices to get even more benefits from the arrow functions.

#functional-programming #web-development #coding #programming #javascript

JavaScript: The Good Parts of Arrow Functions

When I was at a coding boot camp learning about JavaScript and ES6, everyone in class seemed to have some level of confusion around normal function declarations and the new ES6 arrow function declarations. Common questions we had included:

  • When should we use normal functions or arrow functions?
  • What are the differences between normal functions and arrow functions?
  • Are we able to use one or the other in all situations for consistency?

After doing some research, I found that normal functions and arrow functions are actually not interchangeable in certain circumstances. Apart from the syntax, normal functions and arrow functions have another major difference: the way they bind the this keyword in JavaScript.

Let’s look at a very simple example. Suppose we have a simple JavaScript object:

const obj1 = {
	  fullName: 'Object 1',
	  color: 'red',
	  print: function() {
	    console.log(`${this.fullName} is ${this.color}`);
	  }
	};

	obj1.print(); // Object 1 is red
view raw
object1.js hosted with ❤ by GitHub

We have a print method on obj1 that logs a string to the console. The result is what we have expected, that this in the print method refers to obj1 itself.

Now let’s create another object with a slightly different print method:

const obj2 = {
	  fullName: 'Object 2',
	  color: 'blue',
	  print: function() {
	    setTimeout(function() {
	      console.log(`${this.fullName} is ${this.color}`);
	    }, 1000);
	  }
	};

	obj2.print(); // undefined is undefined
view raw
object2.js hosted with ❤ by GitHub

Now the print method will only log the resulting string after one second due to setTimeout . But why is it logging undefined is undefined instead of Object 2 is blue ?

#es2015 #javascript #es6 #javascript-tips #arrow-functions #function