Chet  Lubowitz

Chet Lubowitz

1597843500

Schema-Directives, the Right Way of Doing GraphQL Authorizations

In my last post, I tried to share a way that can be used to implement resolver specific authorization. Even though I’m using it in production, after making some changes to the approach like not using a global dictionary instead of that I’m injecting “User” object to every request context, it has been working well without giving any issues. But I find this approach not so generalized and hence not optimal. As I was new to GraphQL then I’m fine with that novice approach, but as I read more about Graphql specs and different parts of it I learned about schema-directives. With some more reading about using schema-directives with Ariadne it was evident that’s the way to do it, and hence this article.

I’ll be using this repository as a base. If you look into schemas/Query.graphql you will find the following.

directive @is_authenticated on FIELD_DEFINITION

directive @has_permission(

resource: String

permission: String

) on FIELD_DEFINITION

type Query {

“””

Get all users

“””

users(offset: Int = 0, limit: Int = 10): UsersInResp!

_@has_permission(resource: “ps_users”, permission: “read”)

“””

#python #apollo-server #ariadne #graphql-authentication #graphql

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Schema-Directives, the Right Way of Doing GraphQL Authorizations
Brain  Crist

Brain Crist

1600347600

SCHEMAS in SQL Server -MS SQL Server – Zero to Hero Query Master

Introduction

This is part 3 of “MS SQL Server- Zero to Hero” and in this article, we will be discussing about the SCHEMAS in SQL SERVER. Before getting into this article, please consider to visit previous articles in this series from below,

A glimpse of previous articles
Part 1

In part one, we learned the basics of data, database, database management system, and types of DBMS and SQL.

Part 2
  • We learned to create a database and maintain it using SQL statements.
  • Best practice methods were also mentioned.

#sql server #benefits of schemas #create schema in sql #database schemas #how to create schema in sql server #schemas #schemas in sql server #sql server schemas #what is schema in sql server

Chet  Lubowitz

Chet Lubowitz

1597843500

Schema-Directives, the Right Way of Doing GraphQL Authorizations

In my last post, I tried to share a way that can be used to implement resolver specific authorization. Even though I’m using it in production, after making some changes to the approach like not using a global dictionary instead of that I’m injecting “User” object to every request context, it has been working well without giving any issues. But I find this approach not so generalized and hence not optimal. As I was new to GraphQL then I’m fine with that novice approach, but as I read more about Graphql specs and different parts of it I learned about schema-directives. With some more reading about using schema-directives with Ariadne it was evident that’s the way to do it, and hence this article.

I’ll be using this repository as a base. If you look into schemas/Query.graphql you will find the following.

directive @is_authenticated on FIELD_DEFINITION

directive @has_permission(

resource: String

permission: String

) on FIELD_DEFINITION

type Query {

“””

Get all users

“””

users(offset: Int = 0, limit: Int = 10): UsersInResp!

_@has_permission(resource: “ps_users”, permission: “read”)

“””

#python #apollo-server #ariadne #graphql-authentication #graphql

Eleo Nona

Eleo Nona

1603077202

Authorization in GraphQL - Schema Directive vs. GraphQL Shield

This blog also assumes that you are familiar with GraphQL Schema Directives. If not, I recommend reading this Apollo documentation on Schema Directive.

Let’s say we have a basic Blogs application in which an User hasMany Posts and each Post in turn hasMany Comments.

Below is the gist containing the basic GraphQL schema of this application.

const typeDefs = gql`
  input PostInputType {
    id: Int!
    title: String!
    description: String
  }
  type CommentType {
    id: Int!
    comment: String!
  }
  type PostType {
    id: Int!
    title: String
    description: String
    comments: [CommentType]
  }
  type UserType {
    id: Int
    name: String
    email: String
    posts: [PostType]
  }
  type Query {
    users: [UserType]
    posts: [PostType]
  }
`;

#authorization #graphql #javascript #optimization #apollo-server

Delbert  Ferry

Delbert Ferry

1623299446

Three ways to represent your GraphQL schema

The schema is what enables GraphQL to have such a variety of useful developer tools including auto-completing query explorers like GraphiQL and GraphQL playground, editor and IDE integrations, query validation tools, code generation, automatic mocking and more. But in order to use these tools, you first need to acquire the schema from your API and convert it to the appropriate format for the tool.

#graphql #graphql schema

Delbert  Ferry

Delbert Ferry

1622037600

GraphQL schema delegation

Schema stitching and delegation

Schema delegation is often used together with schema stitching. Schema stitching is a process of combining multiple GraphQL schemas together. It simplifies the creation of a gateway schema — especially when there are multiple services. Schema stitching automatically sets up delegation for root fields that already exist in the stitched-together schemas. New root fields (as well as any new non-root fields) require new resolvers.

#graphql #schema delegation #schema