James  Price

James Price

1619643960

Fine-Tuning BERT with HuggingFace and PyTorch Lightning for Multilabel Text Classification | Train

Learn how to create a model that uses BERT to classify toxic comments. Use PyTorch Lightning to train and evaluate it. We’ll look at the history of the training progress using TensorBoard!

In the end, we’ll build a simple function that ties everything together and classifies toxic text.

🔣 GitHub: https://github.com/curiousily/Getting…

Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/VenelinValkovBG/featured

#pytorch #python

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Fine-Tuning BERT with HuggingFace and PyTorch Lightning for Multilabel Text Classification | Train
James  Price

James Price

1619643960

Fine-Tuning BERT with HuggingFace and PyTorch Lightning for Multilabel Text Classification | Train

Learn how to create a model that uses BERT to classify toxic comments. Use PyTorch Lightning to train and evaluate it. We’ll look at the history of the training progress using TensorBoard!

In the end, we’ll build a simple function that ties everything together and classifies toxic text.

🔣 GitHub: https://github.com/curiousily/Getting…

Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/VenelinValkovBG/featured

#pytorch #python

Navigating Between DOM Nodes in JavaScript

In the previous chapters you've learnt how to select individual elements on a web page. But there are many occasions where you need to access a child, parent or ancestor element. See the JavaScript DOM nodes chapter to understand the logical relationships between the nodes in a DOM tree.

DOM node provides several properties and methods that allow you to navigate or traverse through the tree structure of the DOM and make changes very easily. In the following section we will learn how to navigate up, down, and sideways in the DOM tree using JavaScript.

Accessing the Child Nodes

You can use the firstChild and lastChild properties of the DOM node to access the first and last direct child node of a node, respectively. If the node doesn't have any child element, it returns null.

Example

<div id="main">
    <h1 id="title">My Heading</h1>
    <p id="hint"><span>This is some text.</span></p>
</div>

<script>
var main = document.getElementById("main");
console.log(main.firstChild.nodeName); // Prints: #text

var hint = document.getElementById("hint");
console.log(hint.firstChild.nodeName); // Prints: SPAN
</script>

Note: The nodeName is a read-only property that returns the name of the current node as a string. For example, it returns the tag name for element node, #text for text node, #comment for comment node, #document for document node, and so on.

If you notice the above example, the nodeName of the first-child node of the main DIV element returns #text instead of H1. Because, whitespace such as spaces, tabs, newlines, etc. are valid characters and they form #text nodes and become a part of the DOM tree. Therefore, since the <div> tag contains a newline before the <h1> tag, so it will create a #text node.

To avoid the issue with firstChild and lastChild returning #text or #comment nodes, you could alternatively use the firstElementChild and lastElementChild properties to return only the first and last element node, respectively. But, it will not work in IE 9 and earlier.

Example

<div id="main">
    <h1 id="title">My Heading</h1>
    <p id="hint"><span>This is some text.</span></p>
</div>

<script>
var main = document.getElementById("main");
alert(main.firstElementChild.nodeName); // Outputs: H1
main.firstElementChild.style.color = "red";

var hint = document.getElementById("hint");
alert(hint.firstElementChild.nodeName); // Outputs: SPAN
hint.firstElementChild.style.color = "blue";
</script>

Similarly, you can use the childNodes property to access all child nodes of a given element, where the first child node is assigned index 0. Here's an example:

Example

<div id="main">
    <h1 id="title">My Heading</h1>
    <p id="hint"><span>This is some text.</span></p>
</div>

<script>
var main = document.getElementById("main");

// First check that the element has child nodes 
if(main.hasChildNodes()) {
    var nodes = main.childNodes;
    
    // Loop through node list and display node name
    for(var i = 0; i < nodes.length; i++) {
        alert(nodes[i].nodeName);
    }
}
</script>

The childNodes returns all child nodes, including non-element nodes like text and comment nodes. To get a collection of only elements, use children property instead.

Example

<div id="main">
    <h1 id="title">My Heading</h1>
    <p id="hint"><span>This is some text.</span></p>
</div>

<script>
var main = document.getElementById("main");

// First check that the element has child nodes 
if(main.hasChildNodes()) {
    var nodes = main.children;
    
    // Loop through node list and display node name
    for(var i = 0; i < nodes.length; i++) {
        alert(nodes[i].nodeName);
    }
}
</script>

#javascript 

James  Price

James Price

1619661960

Fine-Tuning BERT with HuggingFace and PyTorch Lightning for Multilabel Text Classification | Dataset

Learn how to use BERT to classify toxic comments from raw text. You’ll learn how to prepare a custom dataset, tokenize the text using the Transformers library by HuggingFace. We’ll have a look at PyTorch Lightning and create a data module for our dataset.

🔣 GitHub: https://github.com/curiousily/Getting…

Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/VenelinValkovBG/featured

#pytorch #python

Fine-tuning BERT and RoBERTa for high accuracy text classification in PyTorch

As of the time of writing this piece, state-of-the-art results on NLP and NLU tasks are obtained with Transformer models. There is a trend of performance improvement as models become deeper and larger, GPT 3 comes to mind. Training small versions of such models from scratch takes a significant amount of time, even with GPU. This problem can be solved via pre-training when a model is trained on a large text corpus using a high-performance cluster. Later it can be fine-tuned for a specific task in a much shorter amount of time. During fine tuning stage, additional layers can be added to the model for specific tasks, which can be different from those for which the model was initially trained. This technique is related to transfer learning, a concept applied to areas of machine learning beyond NLP (see here and here for a quick intro).

In this post, I would like to share my experience of fine-tuning BERT and RoBERTa, available from the transformers library by Hugging Face, for a document classification task. Both models share a transformer architecture, which consists of at least two distinct blocks — encoder and decoder. Both encoder and decoder consist of multiple layers based around Attention mechanism. Encoder processed the input token sequence into a vector of floating point numbers — a hidden state, which is picked up by the decoder. It is the hidden state that encompasses the information content of the input sequence. This enables to represent an entire sequence of tokens with a single dense vector of float point numbers. Two texts or documents, which have similar meaning are represented by closely aligned vectors. Comparing vectors using a metric of choice, for example, cosine similarity, enables to quantify the similarity of original text pieces.

#machine-learning #nlp #data-science #text-classification #pytorch

Vern  Greenholt

Vern Greenholt

1595046000

How to fine-tune BERT on text classification task?

BERT (Bidirectional Encoder Representations from Transformers) is a transformer-based architecture released in the paper Attention Is All You Need**_” in the year 2016 by Google. The BERT model got published in the year 2019 in the paper — “BERT: Pre-training of Deep Bidirectional Transformers for Language Understanding”. _**When it was released, it showed the state of the art results on GLUE benchmark.

Introduction

First, I will tell a little bit about the Bert architecture, and then will move on to the code on how to use is for the text classification task.

The BERT architecture is a multi-layer bidirectional transformer’s encoder described in the paper BERT: Pre-training of Deep Bidirectional Transformers for Language Understanding.

There are two different architecture’s proposed in the paper. **BERT_base **and **BERT_large. **The BERT base architecture has L=12, H=768, A=12 and a total of around 110M parameters. Here L refers to the number of transformer blocks, H refers to the hidden size, A refers to the number of self-attention head. For BERT largeL=24, H=1024, A=16.


BERT: State of the Art NLP Model, Explained

Source:- https://www.kdnuggets.com/2018/12/bert-sota-nlp-model-explained.html

The input format of the BERT is given in the above image. I won’t get into much detail into this. You can refer the above link for a more detailed explanation.

Source Code

The code which I will be following can be cloned from the following HuggingFace’s GitHub repo -

https://github.com/huggingface/transformers/

Scripts to be used

Majorly we will be modifying and using two scripts for our text classification task. One is **_glue.py, _**and the other will be **_run_glue.py. _**The file glue.py path is “_transformers/data/processors/” _and the file run_glue.py can be found in the location “examples/text-classification/”.

#deep-learning #machine-learning #text-classification #bert #nlp #deep learning