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TodoGator - Issue Tracker | Bug Tracking System For Teams On Slack

Spring: A Static Web Site Generator Written By GitHub Issues

Spring

Spring is a blog engine written by GitHub Issues, or is a simple, static web site generator. No more server and database, you can setup it in free hosting with GitHub Pages as a repository, then post the blogs in the repository Issues.

You can add some labels in your repository Issues as the blog category, and create Issues for writing blog content through Markdown.

Spring has responsive templates, looking good on mobile, tablet, and desktop.Gracefully degrading in older browsers. Compatible with Internet Explorer 10+ and all modern browsers.

Get up and running in seconds.

中文介绍

Quick start guide

For the impatient, here's how to get a Spring blog site up and running.

First of all

  • Fork the Spring repository as yours.
  • Goto your repository settings page to rename Repository Name.
  • Hosted directly on GitHub Pages from your project repository, you can take it as User or organization site or Project site(create a gh-pages branch).
  • Also, you can set up a custom domain with Pages.

Secondly

  • Open the index.html file to edit the config variables with yours below.
$.extend(spring.config, {
  // my blog title
  title: 'Spring',
  // my blog description
  desc: "A blog engine written by github issues [Fork me on GitHub](https://github.com/zhaoda/spring)",
  // my github username
  owner: 'zhaoda',
  // creator's username
  creator: 'zhaoda',
  // the repository name on github for writting issues
  repo: 'spring',
  // custom page
  pages: [
  ]
})
  • Put your domain into the CNAME file if you have.
  • Commit your change and push it.

And then

  • Goto your repository settings page to turn on the Issues feature.
  • Browser this repository's issues page, like this https://github.com/your-username/your-repo-name/issues?state=open.
  • Click the New Issue button to just write some content as a new one blog.

Finally

  • Browser this repository's GitHub Pages url, like this http://your-username.github.io/your-repo-name, you will see your Spring blog, have a test.
  • And you're done!

Custom development

Installation

  • You will need a web server installed on your system, for example, Nginx, Apache etc.
  • Configure your spring project to your local web server directory.
  • Run and browser it, like http://localhost/spring/dev.html .
  • dev.html is used to develop, index.html is used to runtime.

Folder Structure

spring/
├── css/
|    ├── boot.less  #import other less files
|    ├── github.less  #github highlight style
|    ├── home.less  #home page style
|    ├── issuelist.less #issue list widget style
|    ├── issues.less #issues page style
|    ├── labels.less #labels page style
|    ├── main.less #commo style
|    ├── markdown.less #markdown format style
|    ├── menu.less #menu panel style
|    ├── normalize.less #normalize style
|    ├── pull2refresh.less #pull2refresh widget style
|    └── side.html  #side panel style
├── dist/
|    ├── main.min.css  #css for runtime
|    └── main.min.js  #js for runtime
├── img/  #some icon, startup images
├── js/
|    ├── lib/  #some js librarys need to use
|    ├── boot.js  #boot
|    ├── home.js  #home page
|    ├── issuelist.js #issue list widget
|    ├── issues.js #issues page
|    ├── labels.js #labels page
|    ├── menu.js #menu panel
|    ├── pull2refresh.less #pull2refresh widget
|    └── side.html  #side panel
├── css/
|    ├── boot.less  #import other less files
|    ├── github.less  #github highlight style
|    ├── home.less  #home page style
|    ├── issuelist.less #issue list widget style
|    ├── issues.less #issues page style
|    ├── labels.less #labels page style
|    ├── main.less #commo style
|    ├── markdown.less #markdown format style
|    ├── menu.less #menu panel style
|    ├── normalize.less #normalize style
|    ├── pull2refresh.less #pull2refresh widget style
|    └── side.html  #side panel style
├── dev.html #used to develop
├── favicon.ico #website icon
├── Gruntfile.js #Grunt task config
├── index.html #used to runtime
└── package.json  #nodejs install config

Customization

  • Browser http://localhost/spring/dev.html, enter the development mode.
  • Changes you want to modify the source code, like css, js etc.
  • Refresh dev.html view change.

Building

  • You will need Node.js installed on your system.
  • Installation package.
bash

$ npm install

*   Run grunt task.

    ```bash
$ grunt
  • Browser http://localhost/spring/index.html, enter the runtime mode.
  • If there is no problem, commit and push the code.
  • Don't forget to merge master branch into gh-pages branch if you have.
  • And you're done! Good luck!

Report a bug

Who used

If you are using, please tell me.

Download Details:
Author: zhaoda
Source Code: https://github.com/zhaoda/spring
License: MIT License

#spring #spring-framework #spring-boot #java 

TodoGator - Issue Tracker | Bug Tracking System For Teams On Slack

TodoGator is an issue tracking application for teams on Slack.​

TodoGator helps you track tasks, bugs and manage projects more efficiently. It is simple, yet packed with great features for teams to get work done faster.

Feature Highlights

Add tasks from Slack
You can add tasks to your team-mates directly from Slack using slash commands. You can also click on the menu for any message and convert it into a task. You can also update status, add priority, description etc all from Slack itself.

Custom workflow
Every team follows a different workflow when it comes to managing projects. On TodoGator, you can customize the workflow to meet your team’s needs.
Slack notifications - Whenever a new task is added or a status updated by a team member, you can get notified. This is fully customizable for each space within your workspace.

Spaces
Spaces are like projects. You can create any number of spaces to manage your projects. Within spaces, you can create any number of lists to manage your tasks.

Keyboard shortcuts
Add tasks, update priority, status, assignee etc all using keyboard shortcuts. We are adding more keyboard shortcuts to make your experience faster.

Custom colors and labels
All labels and statuses are fully customizable based on your preference.

Dark mode
If you love dark mode interfaces, we have that too.

Pricing
We have a full feature free version for upto 5 users. After that, you only pay for each additional user. Pricing is calculated on the number of users that are added to your workspace.

#issue #tracking #tool

Chet  Lubowitz

Chet Lubowitz

1595429220

How to Install Microsoft Teams on Ubuntu 20.04

Microsoft Teams is a communication platform used for Chat, Calling, Meetings, and Collaboration. Generally, it is used by companies and individuals working on projects. However, Microsoft Teams is available for macOS, Windows, and Linux operating systems available now.

In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Microsoft Teams on Ubuntu 20.04 machine. By default, Microsoft Teams package is not available in the Ubuntu default repository. However we will show you 2 methods to install Teams by downloading the Debian package from their official website, or by adding the Microsoft repository.

Install Microsoft Teams on Ubuntu 20.04

1./ Install Microsoft Teams using Debian installer file

01- First, navigate to teams app downloads page and grab the Debian binary installer. You can simply obtain the URL and pull the binary using wget;

$ VERSION=1.3.00.5153
$ wget https://packages.microsoft.com/repos/ms-teams/pool/main/t/teams/teams_${VERSION}_amd64.deb

#linux #ubuntu #install microsoft teams on ubuntu #install teams ubuntu #microsoft teams #teams #teams download ubuntu #teams install ubuntu #ubuntu install microsoft teams #uninstall teams ubuntu

Ruth  Nabimanya

Ruth Nabimanya

1620633584

System Databases in SQL Server

Introduction

In SSMS, we many of may noticed System Databases under the Database Folder. But how many of us knows its purpose?. In this article lets discuss about the System Databases in SQL Server.

System Database

Fig. 1 System Databases

There are five system databases, these databases are created while installing SQL Server.

  • Master
  • Model
  • MSDB
  • Tempdb
  • Resource
Master
  • This database contains all the System level Information in SQL Server. The Information in form of Meta data.
  • Because of this master database, we are able to access the SQL Server (On premise SQL Server)
Model
  • This database is used as a template for new databases.
  • Whenever a new database is created, initially a copy of model database is what created as new database.
MSDB
  • This database is where a service called SQL Server Agent stores its data.
  • SQL server Agent is in charge of automation, which includes entities such as jobs, schedules, and alerts.
TempDB
  • The Tempdb is where SQL Server stores temporary data such as work tables, sort space, row versioning information and etc.
  • User can create their own version of temporary tables and those are stored in Tempdb.
  • But this database is destroyed and recreated every time when we restart the instance of SQL Server.
Resource
  • The resource database is a hidden, read only database that holds the definitions of all system objects.
  • When we query system object in a database, they appear to reside in the sys schema of the local database, but in actually their definitions reside in the resource db.

#sql server #master system database #model system database #msdb system database #sql server system databases #ssms #system database #system databases in sql server #tempdb system database

Beth  Cooper

Beth Cooper

1659694200

Easy Activity Tracking for Models, Similar to Github's Public Activity

PublicActivity

public_activity provides easy activity tracking for your ActiveRecord, Mongoid 3 and MongoMapper models in Rails 3 and 4.

Simply put: it can record what happens in your application and gives you the ability to present those recorded activities to users - in a similar way to how GitHub does it.

!! WARNING: README for unreleased version below. !!

You probably don't want to read the docs for this unreleased version 2.0.

For the stable 1.5.X readme see: https://github.com/chaps-io/public_activity/blob/1-5-stable/README.md

About

Here is a simple example showing what this gem is about:

Example usage

Tutorials

Screencast

Ryan Bates made a great screencast describing how to integrate Public Activity.

Tutorial

A great step-by-step guide on implementing activity feeds using public_activity by Ilya Bodrov.

Online demo

You can see an actual application using this gem here: http://public-activity-example.herokuapp.com/feed

The source code of the demo is hosted here: https://github.com/pokonski/activity_blog

Setup

Gem installation

You can install public_activity as you would any other gem:

gem install public_activity

or in your Gemfile:

gem 'public_activity'

Database setup

By default public_activity uses Active Record. If you want to use Mongoid or MongoMapper as your backend, create an initializer file in your Rails application with the corresponding code inside:

For Mongoid:

# config/initializers/public_activity.rb
PublicActivity.configure do |config|
  config.orm = :mongoid
end

For MongoMapper:

# config/initializers/public_activity.rb
PublicActivity.configure do |config|
  config.orm = :mongo_mapper
end

(ActiveRecord only) Create migration for activities and migrate the database (in your Rails project):

rails g public_activity:migration
rake db:migrate

Model configuration

Include PublicActivity::Model and add tracked to the model you want to keep track of:

For ActiveRecord:

class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked
end

For Mongoid:

class Article
  include Mongoid::Document
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked
end

For MongoMapper:

class Article
  include MongoMapper::Document
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked
end

And now, by default create/update/destroy activities are recorded in activities table. This is all you need to start recording activities for basic CRUD actions.

Optional: If you don't need #tracked but still want the comfort of #create_activity, you can include only the lightweight Common module instead of Model.

Custom activities

You can trigger custom activities by setting all your required parameters and triggering create_activity on the tracked model, like this:

@article.create_activity key: 'article.commented_on', owner: current_user

See this entry http://rubydoc.info/gems/public_activity/PublicActivity/Common:create_activity for more details.

Displaying activities

To display them you simply query the PublicActivity::Activity model:

# notifications_controller.rb
def index
  @activities = PublicActivity::Activity.all
end

And in your views:

<%= render_activities(@activities) %>

Note: render_activities is an alias for render_activity and does the same.

Layouts

You can also pass options to both activity#render and #render_activity methods, which are passed deeper to the internally used render_partial method. A useful example would be to render activities wrapped in layout, which shares common elements of an activity, like a timestamp, owner's avatar etc:

<%= render_activities(@activities, layout: :activity) %>

The activity will be wrapped with the app/views/layouts/_activity.html.erb layout, in the above example.

Important: please note that layouts for activities are also partials. Hence the _ prefix.

Locals

Sometimes, it's desirable to pass additional local variables to partials. It can be done this way:

<%= render_activity(@activity, locals: {friends: current_user.friends}) %>

Note: Before 1.4.0, one could pass variables directly to the options hash for #render_activity and access it from activity parameters. This functionality is retained in 1.4.0 and later, but the :locals method is preferred, since it prevents bugs from shadowing variables from activity parameters in the database.

Activity views

public_activity looks for views in app/views/public_activity.

For example, if you have an activity with :key set to "activity.user.changed_avatar", the gem will look for a partial in app/views/public_activity/user/_changed_avatar.html.(|erb|haml|slim|something_else).

Hint: the "activity." prefix in :key is completely optional and kept for backwards compatibility, you can skip it in new projects.

If you would like to fallback to a partial, you can utilize the fallback parameter to specify the path of a partial to use when one is missing:

<%= render_activity(@activity, fallback: 'default') %>

When used in this manner, if a partial with the specified :key cannot be located it will use the partial defined in the fallback instead. In the example above this would resolve to public_activity/_default.html.(|erb|haml|slim|something_else).

If a view file does not exist then ActionView::MisingTemplate will be raised. If you wish to fallback to the old behaviour and use an i18n based translation in this situation you can specify a :fallback parameter of text to fallback to this mechanism like such:

<%= render_activity(@activity, fallback: :text) %>

i18n

Translations are used by the #text method, to which you can pass additional options in form of a hash. #render method uses translations when view templates have not been provided. You can render pure i18n strings by passing {display: :i18n} to #render_activity or #render.

Translations should be put in your locale .yml files. To render pure strings from I18n Example structure:

activity:
  article:
    create: 'Article has been created'
    update: 'Someone has edited the article'
    destroy: 'Some user removed an article!'

This structure is valid for activities with keys "activity.article.create" or "article.create". As mentioned before, "activity." part of the key is optional.

Testing

For RSpec you can first disable public_activity and add require helper methods in the rails_helper.rb with:

#rails_helper.rb
require 'public_activity/testing'

PublicActivity.enabled = false

In your specs you can then blockwise decide whether to turn public_activity on or off.

# file_spec.rb
PublicActivity.with_tracking do
  # your test code goes here
end

PublicActivity.without_tracking do
  # your test code goes here
end

Documentation

For more documentation go here

Common examples

Set the Activity's owner to current_user by default

You can set up a default value for :owner by doing this:

  1. Include PublicActivity::StoreController in your ApplicationController like this:
class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
  include PublicActivity::StoreController
end
  1. Use Proc in :owner attribute for tracked class method in your desired model. For example:
class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  tracked owner: Proc.new{ |controller, model| controller.current_user }
end

Note: current_user applies to Devise, if you are using a different authentication gem or your own code, change the current_user to a method you use.

Disable tracking for a class or globally

If you need to disable tracking temporarily, for example in tests or db/seeds.rb then you can use PublicActivity.enabled= attribute like below:

# Disable p_a globally
PublicActivity.enabled = false

# Perform some operations that would normally be tracked by p_a:
Article.create(title: 'New article')

# Switch it back on
PublicActivity.enabled = true

You can also disable public_activity for a specific class:

# Disable p_a for Article class
Article.public_activity_off

# p_a will not do anything here:
@article = Article.create(title: 'New article')

# But will be enabled for other classes:
# (creation of the comment will be recorded if you are tracking the Comment class)
@article.comments.create(body: 'some comment!')

# Enable it again for Article:
Article.public_activity_on

Create custom activities

Besides standard, automatic activities created on CRUD actions on your model (deactivatable), you can post your own activities that can be triggered without modifying the tracked model. There are a few ways to do this, as PublicActivity gives three tiers of options to be set.

Instant options

Because every activity needs a key (otherwise: NoKeyProvided is raised), the shortest and minimal way to post an activity is:

@user.create_activity :mood_changed
# the key of the action will be user.mood_changed
@user.create_activity action: :mood_changed # this is exactly the same as above

Besides assigning your key (which is obvious from the code), it will take global options from User class (given in #tracked method during class definition) and overwrite them with instance options (set on @user by #activity method). You can read more about options and how PublicActivity inherits them for you here.

Note the action parameter builds the key like this: "#{model_name}.#{action}". You can read further on options for #create_activity here.

To provide more options, you can do:

@user.create_activity action: 'poke', parameters: {reason: 'bored'}, recipient: @friend, owner: current_user

In this example, we have provided all the things we could for a standard Activity.

Use custom fields on Activity

Besides the few fields that every Activity has (key, owner, recipient, trackable, parameters), you can also set custom fields. This could be very beneficial, as parameters are a serialized hash, which cannot be queried easily from the database. That being said, use custom fields when you know that you will set them very often and search by them (don't forget database indexes :) ).

Set owner and recipient based on associations

class Comment < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked owner: :commenter, recipient: :commentee

  belongs_to :commenter, :class_name => "User"
  belongs_to :commentee, :class_name => "User"
end

Resolve parameters from a Symbol or Proc

class Post < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked only: [:update], parameters: :tracked_values
  
  def tracked_values
   {}.tap do |hash|
     hash[:tags] = tags if tags_changed?
   end
  end
end

Setup

Skip this step if you are using ActiveRecord in Rails 4 or Mongoid

The first step is similar in every ORM available (except mongoid):

PublicActivity::Activity.class_eval do
  attr_accessible :custom_field
end

place this code under config/initializers/public_activity.rb, you have to create it first.

To be able to assign to that field, we need to move it to the mass assignment sanitizer's whitelist.

Migration

If you're using ActiveRecord, you will also need to provide a migration to add the actual field to the Activity. Taken from our tests:

class AddCustomFieldToActivities < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    change_table :activities do |t|
      t.string :custom_field
    end
  end
end

Assigning custom fields

Assigning is done by the same methods that you use for normal parameters: #tracked, #create_activity. You can just pass the name of your custom variable and assign its value. Even better, you can pass it to #tracked to tell us how to harvest your data for custom fields so we can do that for you.

class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked custom_field: proc {|controller, model| controller.some_helper }
end

Help

If you need help with using public_activity please visit our discussion group and ask a question there:

https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!forum/public-activity

Please do not ask general questions in the Github Issues.


Author: public-activity
Source code: https://github.com/public-activity/public_activity
License: MIT license

#ruby  #ruby-on-rails