Alisha  Larkin

Alisha Larkin

1624712880

Adding Azure Architecture Icons To MS Visio

Microsoft publishes and updates enterprise architecture icons on a routine basis. Earlier, these used to be images that can be easily used in tools like Visio, PowerPoint, etc. to create relevant architecture diagrams for solutions. Microsoft has shifted from providing Visio stencils in favor of more application generic Scalable Vector Graphic (SVG) icons for Azure services and configuration items.

SVG’s can easily be imported into Visio and due to the file format supporting faster scaling with no loss of image quality these icons work great. Like most others, I was also doing a drag and drop of the SVG Icon that I needed in Visio until renaming all icons to longer hyphenated strings and numbers caused me to look for an easier way to do this instead of doing a complex search and then drag and drop.

In order to make all your Azure architecture icons available within the Visio, we just need to follow the below-mentioned simple set of steps.

Step 1 - Download the latest Azure Icon Stencil

Step 2 - Unzip Icons & Move them

Step 3 - Configuring Visio

** Step 4 - Testing Visio**

#ms visio #azure #architecture #icons

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Adding Azure Architecture Icons To MS Visio
Alisha  Larkin

Alisha Larkin

1624712880

Adding Azure Architecture Icons To MS Visio

Microsoft publishes and updates enterprise architecture icons on a routine basis. Earlier, these used to be images that can be easily used in tools like Visio, PowerPoint, etc. to create relevant architecture diagrams for solutions. Microsoft has shifted from providing Visio stencils in favor of more application generic Scalable Vector Graphic (SVG) icons for Azure services and configuration items.

SVG’s can easily be imported into Visio and due to the file format supporting faster scaling with no loss of image quality these icons work great. Like most others, I was also doing a drag and drop of the SVG Icon that I needed in Visio until renaming all icons to longer hyphenated strings and numbers caused me to look for an easier way to do this instead of doing a complex search and then drag and drop.

In order to make all your Azure architecture icons available within the Visio, we just need to follow the below-mentioned simple set of steps.

Step 1 - Download the latest Azure Icon Stencil

Step 2 - Unzip Icons & Move them

Step 3 - Configuring Visio

** Step 4 - Testing Visio**

#ms visio #azure #architecture #icons

Ron  Cartwright

Ron Cartwright

1600624800

Getting Started With Azure Event Grid Viewer

In the last article, we had a look at how to start with Azure DevOps: Getting Started With Audit Streaming With Event Grid

In the article, we will go to the next step to create a subscription and use webhook event handlers to view those logs in our Azure web application.

#cloud #tutorial #azure #event driven architecture #realtime #signalr #webhook #azure web services #azure event grid #azure #azure event grid #serverless architecture #application integration

Eric  Bukenya

Eric Bukenya

1624713540

Learn NoSQL in Azure: Diving Deeper into Azure Cosmos DB

This article is a part of the series – Learn NoSQL in Azure where we explore Azure Cosmos DB as a part of the non-relational database system used widely for a variety of applications. Azure Cosmos DB is a part of Microsoft’s serverless databases on Azure which is highly scalable and distributed across all locations that run on Azure. It is offered as a platform as a service (PAAS) from Azure and you can develop databases that have a very high throughput and very low latency. Using Azure Cosmos DB, customers can replicate their data across multiple locations across the globe and also across multiple locations within the same region. This makes Cosmos DB a highly available database service with almost 99.999% availability for reads and writes for multi-region modes and almost 99.99% availability for single-region modes.

In this article, we will focus more on how Azure Cosmos DB works behind the scenes and how can you get started with it using the Azure Portal. We will also explore how Cosmos DB is priced and understand the pricing model in detail.

How Azure Cosmos DB works

As already mentioned, Azure Cosmos DB is a multi-modal NoSQL database service that is geographically distributed across multiple Azure locations. This helps customers to deploy the databases across multiple locations around the globe. This is beneficial as it helps to reduce the read latency when the users use the application.

As you can see in the figure above, Azure Cosmos DB is distributed across the globe. Let’s suppose you have a web application that is hosted in India. In that case, the NoSQL database in India will be considered as the master database for writes and all the other databases can be considered as a read replicas. Whenever new data is generated, it is written to the database in India first and then it is synchronized with the other databases.

Consistency Levels

While maintaining data over multiple regions, the most common challenge is the latency as when the data is made available to the other databases. For example, when data is written to the database in India, users from India will be able to see that data sooner than users from the US. This is due to the latency in synchronization between the two regions. In order to overcome this, there are a few modes that customers can choose from and define how often or how soon they want their data to be made available in the other regions. Azure Cosmos DB offers five levels of consistency which are as follows:

  • Strong
  • Bounded staleness
  • Session
  • Consistent prefix
  • Eventual

In most common NoSQL databases, there are only two levels – Strong and EventualStrong being the most consistent level while Eventual is the least. However, as we move from Strong to Eventual, consistency decreases but availability and throughput increase. This is a trade-off that customers need to decide based on the criticality of their applications. If you want to read in more detail about the consistency levels, the official guide from Microsoft is the easiest to understand. You can refer to it here.

Azure Cosmos DB Pricing Model

Now that we have some idea about working with the NoSQL database – Azure Cosmos DB on Azure, let us try to understand how the database is priced. In order to work with any cloud-based services, it is essential that you have a sound knowledge of how the services are charged, otherwise, you might end up paying something much higher than your expectations.

If you browse to the pricing page of Azure Cosmos DB, you can see that there are two modes in which the database services are billed.

  • Database Operations – Whenever you execute or run queries against your NoSQL database, there are some resources being used. Azure terms these usages in terms of Request Units or RU. The amount of RU consumed per second is aggregated and billed
  • Consumed Storage – As you start storing data in your database, it will take up some space in order to store that data. This storage is billed per the standard SSD-based storage across any Azure locations globally

Let’s learn about this in more detail.

#azure #azure cosmos db #nosql #azure #nosql in azure #azure cosmos db

Ruthie  Bugala

Ruthie Bugala

1620435660

How to set up Azure Data Sync between Azure SQL databases and on-premises SQL Server

In this article, you learn how to set up Azure Data Sync services. In addition, you will also learn how to create and set up a data sync group between Azure SQL database and on-premises SQL Server.

In this article, you will see:

  • Overview of Azure SQL Data Sync feature
  • Discuss key components
  • Comparison between Azure SQL Data sync with the other Azure Data option
  • Setup Azure SQL Data Sync
  • More…

Azure Data Sync

Azure Data Sync —a synchronization service set up on an Azure SQL Database. This service synchronizes the data across multiple SQL databases. You can set up bi-directional data synchronization where data ingest and egest process happens between the SQL databases—It can be between Azure SQL database and on-premises and/or within the cloud Azure SQL database. At this moment, the only limitation is that it will not support Azure SQL Managed Instance.

#azure #sql azure #azure sql #azure data sync #azure sql #sql server

Cody  Osinski

Cody Osinski

1623284580

Hybrid Identity Solution with Azure AD and Azure AD B2C

I am going to retire the current stack of technologies used in this blog in favor of more recent technologies, mainly because I currently author this blog using Windows Live Writer which is outdated and has lost the love of community. I am also taking this opportunity to create a new technology stack that is much more modular and allows me to focus only on writing. I am also learning cool new stuff which might be useful to all of us. I am super happy with a few components that I currently use and I would be reusing the things that are working well. The entire source code of this blog is available in my GitHub repository from where you can happily copy and paste stuff. You can also read about how I built the existing blog framework (v1) here. Of course, I would write about how I chose components for my new blogging platform and how you can set one up yourself, so stay tuned (even better, subscribe).

September 8, 2016: This activity is now complete and you are reading this post on my new blogging platform.

Azure Access Control Service is dead (well almost). Azure AD B2C is out, up and running and supports many of the common social accounts and even using new credentials. Both the Azure AD and Azure AD B2C use OAuth 2.0 mechanism to authorize access to resources of users. At this point some of you may want to understand…

What is OAuth 2.0?

If you like reading loads of text, here is what Microsoft’s documentation recommends that you read. For the rest of us, including me, we will use OAuth 2.0 playground to understand what OAuth is. For this activity you will require an account with Google and an interest in YouTube. We will use OAuth based flow to fetch the content that is displayed on your YouTube homepage.

There are four parties in the OAuth flow, namely:

  1. Resource Owner: In our experiment this is you. The Resource Owner or user grants permission to an application to access his\her content (YouTube feed data). The access of application is limited to the scope of authorization (e.g. read only, write only, read-write etc.)
  2. Authorization Server: This server stores the identity information of the Resource Owner, which in our case is Google’s identity server. It accepts user credentials and passes two tokens to the application.
  3. Access Token: The token which the application can use to access the Resource Owner’s content.
  4. Refresh Token: The token that the application can use to get a fresh Access Token before or when the Access Token expires. The Refresh Token may have a lifetime after which it becomes invalid. Once that happens, the user would be required to authenticate himself\herself again.
  5. Client/Application: The Client is the application that wants to access the Resource Owner’s data. Before it may do so, it must be authorized by the Resource Owner and the authorization must be validated by the Authorization Server.
  6. Resource Server: This the application that trusts the Authorization Server and will honor requests that are sent with Access Tokens by the application. This in our case is YouTube. Resource Owner can limit the authorization granted to the client by specifying the Scope. You must have seen the application of Scope in Facebook’s ability for users to authorize a variety of different functions to the client (“access basic information”, “post on wall”, etc.).

#azure ad b2c #azure ad