How to Build a Twitter Sentiment Analysis Python Program? [Step-by-Step Tutorial]

As companies are becoming increasingly data-driven, a Machine Learning technique called ‘Sentiment Analysis’ is gaining immense popularity day by day. It analyses the digital data/text through Natural Language Processing (NLP) to find the polarity (positive, negative, neutral), feelings, and emotions (angry, happy, sad, etc.) expressed in the text.

Since Twitter is one of the most comprehensive sources of live, public conversation worldwide, business firms, political groups, etc. are interested in performing ‘Sentiment Analysis’ of tweets to understand the emotions/opinions of the target market or for studying competitors’ market. Although they are ready to use programs for the purpose but to achieve predictions with a high level of accuracy, specific to particular criteria and domains, the best way is to create a customized Twitter Sentiment Analysis Python model or program.

#artificial intelligence #python #sentiment analysing using python #sentiment analysis

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

How to Build a Twitter Sentiment Analysis Python Program? [Step-by-Step Tutorial]

How to Build a Twitter Sentiment Analysis Python Program? [Step-by-Step Tutorial]

As companies are becoming increasingly data-driven, a Machine Learning technique called ‘Sentiment Analysis’ is gaining immense popularity day by day. It analyses the digital data/text through Natural Language Processing (NLP) to find the polarity (positive, negative, neutral), feelings, and emotions (angry, happy, sad, etc.) expressed in the text.

Since Twitter is one of the most comprehensive sources of live, public conversation worldwide, business firms, political groups, etc. are interested in performing ‘Sentiment Analysis’ of tweets to understand the emotions/opinions of the target market or for studying competitors’ market. Although they are ready to use programs for the purpose but to achieve predictions with a high level of accuracy, specific to particular criteria and domains, the best way is to create a customized Twitter Sentiment Analysis Python model or program.

#artificial intelligence #python #sentiment analysing using python #sentiment analysis

August  Larson

August Larson

1624930726

Automating WhatsApp Web with Alright and Python

Alright is a python wrapper that helps you automate WhatsApp web using python, giving you the capability to send messages, images, video, and files to both saved and unsaved contacts without having to rescan the QR code every time.

Why Alright?

I was looking for a way to control and automate WhatsApp web with Python; I came across some very nice libraries and wrappers implementations, including:

  1. pywhatkit
  2. pywhatsapp
  3. PyWhatsapp
  4. WebWhatsapp-Wrapper

So I tried

pywhatkit, a well crafted to be used, but its implementations require you to open a new browser tab and scan QR code every time you send a message, no matter if it’s the same person, which was a deal-breaker for using it.

I then tried

pywhatsapp,which is based onyowsupand require you to do some registration withyowsupbefore using it of which after a bit of googling, I got scared of having my number blocked. So I went for the next option.

I then went for WebWhatsapp-Wrapper. It has some good documentation and recent commits so I had hoped it is going to work. But It didn’t for me, and after having a couple of errors, I abandoned it to look for the next alternative.

PyWhatsapp by shauryauppal, which was more of a CLI tool than a wrapper, surprisingly worked. Its approach allows you to dynamically send WhatsApp messages to unsaved contacts without rescanning QR-code every time.

So what I did is refactoring the implementation of that tool to be more of a wrapper to easily allow people to run different scripts on top of it. Instead of just using it as a tool, I then thought of sharing the codebase with people who might struggle to do this as I did.

#python #python-programming #python-tutorials #python-programming-lists #selenium #python-dev-tips #python-developers #programming #web-monetization

Biju Augustian

Biju Augustian

1574339477

Python Programming Tutorials For Beginners

Description
Hello and welcome to brand new series of wiredwiki. In this series i will teach you guys all you need to know about python. This series is designed for beginners but that doesn’t means that i will not talk about the advanced stuff as well.

As you may all know by now that my approach of teaching is very simple and straightforward.In this series i will be talking about the all the things you need to know to jump start you python programming skills. This series is designed for noobs who are totally new to programming, so if you don’t know any thing about

programming than this is the way to go guys Here is the links to all the videos that i will upload in this whole series.

In this video i will talk about all the basic introduction you need to know about python, which python version to choose, how to install python, how to get around with the interface, how to code your first program. Than we will talk about operators, expressions, numbers, strings, boo leans, lists, dictionaries, tuples and than inputs in python. With

Lots of exercises and more fun stuff, let’s get started.

Download free Exercise files.

Dropbox: https://bit.ly/2AW7FYF

Who is the target audience?

First time Python programmers
Students and Teachers
IT pros who want to learn to code
Aspiring data scientists who want to add Python to their tool arsenal
Basic knowledge
Students should be comfortable working in the PC or Mac operating system
What will you learn
know basic programming concept and skill
build 6 text-based application using python
be able to learn other programming languages
be able to build sophisticated system using python in the future

To know more:

#python #Python Programming #Python Programming Tutorials #Python Programming Tutorials For Beginners

Dylan  Iqbal

Dylan Iqbal

1561523460

Matplotlib Cheat Sheet: Plotting in Python

This Matplotlib cheat sheet introduces you to the basics that you need to plot your data with Python and includes code samples.

Data visualization and storytelling with your data are essential skills that every data scientist needs to communicate insights gained from analyses effectively to any audience out there. 

For most beginners, the first package that they use to get in touch with data visualization and storytelling is, naturally, Matplotlib: it is a Python 2D plotting library that enables users to make publication-quality figures. But, what might be even more convincing is the fact that other packages, such as Pandas, intend to build more plotting integration with Matplotlib as time goes on.

However, what might slow down beginners is the fact that this package is pretty extensive. There is so much that you can do with it and it might be hard to still keep a structure when you're learning how to work with Matplotlib.   

DataCamp has created a Matplotlib cheat sheet for those who might already know how to use the package to their advantage to make beautiful plots in Python, but that still want to keep a one-page reference handy. Of course, for those who don't know how to work with Matplotlib, this might be the extra push be convinced and to finally get started with data visualization in Python. 

You'll see that this cheat sheet presents you with the six basic steps that you can go through to make beautiful plots. 

Check out the infographic by clicking on the button below:

Python Matplotlib cheat sheet

With this handy reference, you'll familiarize yourself in no time with the basics of Matplotlib: you'll learn how you can prepare your data, create a new plot, use some basic plotting routines to your advantage, add customizations to your plots, and save, show and close the plots that you make.

What might have looked difficult before will definitely be more clear once you start using this cheat sheet! Use it in combination with the Matplotlib Gallery, the documentation.

Matplotlib 

Matplotlib is a Python 2D plotting library which produces publication-quality figures in a variety of hardcopy formats and interactive environments across platforms.

Prepare the Data 

1D Data 

>>> import numpy as np
>>> x = np.linspace(0, 10, 100)
>>> y = np.cos(x)
>>> z = np.sin(x)

2D Data or Images 

>>> data = 2 * np.random.random((10, 10))
>>> data2 = 3 * np.random.random((10, 10))
>>> Y, X = np.mgrid[-3:3:100j, -3:3:100j]
>>> U = 1 X** 2 + Y
>>> V = 1 + X Y**2
>>> from matplotlib.cbook import get_sample_data
>>> img = np.load(get_sample_data('axes_grid/bivariate_normal.npy'))

Create Plot

>>> import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

Figure 

>>> fig = plt.figure()
>>> fig2 = plt.figure(figsize=plt.figaspect(2.0))

Axes 

>>> fig.add_axes()
>>> ax1 = fig.add_subplot(221) #row-col-num
>>> ax3 = fig.add_subplot(212)
>>> fig3, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2,ncols=2)
>>> fig4, axes2 = plt.subplots(ncols=3)

Save Plot 

>>> plt.savefig('foo.png') #Save figures
>>> plt.savefig('foo.png',  transparent=True) #Save transparent figures

Show Plot

>>> plt.show()

Plotting Routines 

1D Data 

>>> fig, ax = plt.subplots()
>>> lines = ax.plot(x,y) #Draw points with lines or markers connecting them
>>> ax.scatter(x,y) #Draw unconnected points, scaled or colored
>>> axes[0,0].bar([1,2,3],[3,4,5]) #Plot vertical rectangles (constant width)
>>> axes[1,0].barh([0.5,1,2.5],[0,1,2]) #Plot horiontal rectangles (constant height)
>>> axes[1,1].axhline(0.45) #Draw a horizontal line across axes
>>> axes[0,1].axvline(0.65) #Draw a vertical line across axes
>>> ax.fill(x,y,color='blue') #Draw filled polygons
>>> ax.fill_between(x,y,color='yellow') #Fill between y values and 0

2D Data 

>>> fig, ax = plt.subplots()
>>> im = ax.imshow(img, #Colormapped or RGB arrays
      cmap= 'gist_earth', 
      interpolation= 'nearest',
      vmin=-2,
      vmax=2)
>>> axes2[0].pcolor(data2) #Pseudocolor plot of 2D array
>>> axes2[0].pcolormesh(data) #Pseudocolor plot of 2D array
>>> CS = plt.contour(Y,X,U) #Plot contours
>>> axes2[2].contourf(data1) #Plot filled contours
>>> axes2[2]= ax.clabel(CS) #Label a contour plot

Vector Fields 

>>> axes[0,1].arrow(0,0,0.5,0.5) #Add an arrow to the axes
>>> axes[1,1].quiver(y,z) #Plot a 2D field of arrows
>>> axes[0,1].streamplot(X,Y,U,V) #Plot a 2D field of arrows

Data Distributions 

>>> ax1.hist(y) #Plot a histogram
>>> ax3.boxplot(y) #Make a box and whisker plot
>>> ax3.violinplot(z)  #Make a violin plot

Plot Anatomy & Workflow 

Plot Anatomy 

 y-axis      

                           x-axis 

Workflow 

The basic steps to creating plots with matplotlib are:

1 Prepare Data
2 Create Plot
3 Plot
4 Customized Plot
5 Save Plot
6 Show Plot

>>> import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
>>> x = [1,2,3,4]  #Step 1
>>> y = [10,20,25,30] 
>>> fig = plt.figure() #Step 2
>>> ax = fig.add_subplot(111) #Step 3
>>> ax.plot(x, y, color= 'lightblue', linewidth=3)  #Step 3, 4
>>> ax.scatter([2,4,6],
          [5,15,25],
          color= 'darkgreen',
          marker= '^' )
>>> ax.set_xlim(1, 6.5)
>>> plt.savefig('foo.png' ) #Step 5
>>> plt.show() #Step 6

Close and Clear 

>>> plt.cla()  #Clear an axis
>>> plt.clf(). #Clear the entire figure
>>> plt.close(). #Close a window

Plotting Customize Plot 

Colors, Color Bars & Color Maps 

>>> plt.plot(x, x, x, x**2, x, x** 3)
>>> ax.plot(x, y, alpha = 0.4)
>>> ax.plot(x, y, c= 'k')
>>> fig.colorbar(im, orientation= 'horizontal')
>>> im = ax.imshow(img,
            cmap= 'seismic' )

Markers 

>>> fig, ax = plt.subplots()
>>> ax.scatter(x,y,marker= ".")
>>> ax.plot(x,y,marker= "o")

Linestyles 

>>> plt.plot(x,y,linewidth=4.0)
>>> plt.plot(x,y,ls= 'solid') 
>>> plt.plot(x,y,ls= '--') 
>>> plt.plot(x,y,'--' ,x**2,y**2,'-.' ) 
>>> plt.setp(lines,color= 'r',linewidth=4.0)

Text & Annotations 

>>> ax.text(1,
           -2.1, 
           'Example Graph', 
            style= 'italic' )
>>> ax.annotate("Sine", 
xy=(8, 0),
xycoords= 'data', 
xytext=(10.5, 0),
textcoords= 'data', 
arrowprops=dict(arrowstyle= "->", 
connectionstyle="arc3"),)

Mathtext 

>>> plt.title(r '$sigma_i=15$', fontsize=20)

Limits, Legends and Layouts 

Limits & Autoscaling 

>>> ax.margins(x=0.0,y=0.1) #Add padding to a plot
>>> ax.axis('equal')  #Set the aspect ratio of the plot to 1
>>> ax.set(xlim=[0,10.5],ylim=[-1.5,1.5])  #Set limits for x-and y-axis
>>> ax.set_xlim(0,10.5) #Set limits for x-axis

Legends 

>>> ax.set(title= 'An Example Axes',  #Set a title and x-and y-axis labels
            ylabel= 'Y-Axis', 
            xlabel= 'X-Axis')
>>> ax.legend(loc= 'best')  #No overlapping plot elements

Ticks 

>>> ax.xaxis.set(ticks=range(1,5),  #Manually set x-ticks
             ticklabels=[3,100, 12,"foo" ])
>>> ax.tick_params(axis= 'y', #Make y-ticks longer and go in and out
             direction= 'inout', 
              length=10)

Subplot Spacing 

>>> fig3.subplots_adjust(wspace=0.5,   #Adjust the spacing between subplots
             hspace=0.3,
             left=0.125,
             right=0.9,
             top=0.9,
             bottom=0.1)
>>> fig.tight_layout() #Fit subplot(s) in to the figure area

Axis Spines 

>>> ax1.spines[ 'top'].set_visible(False) #Make the top axis line for a plot invisible
>>> ax1.spines['bottom' ].set_position(( 'outward',10))  #Move the bottom axis line outward

Have this Cheat Sheet at your fingertips

Original article source at https://www.datacamp.com

#matplotlib #cheatsheet #python

Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1619510796

Lambda, Map, Filter functions in python

Welcome to my Blog, In this article, we will learn python lambda function, Map function, and filter function.

Lambda function in python: Lambda is a one line anonymous function and lambda takes any number of arguments but can only have one expression and python lambda syntax is

Syntax: x = lambda arguments : expression

Now i will show you some python lambda function examples:

#python #anonymous function python #filter function in python #lambda #lambda python 3 #map python #python filter #python filter lambda #python lambda #python lambda examples #python map