Ida  Nader

Ida Nader

1595155980

Getting Started with Material UI

Material UI is a Material Design library made for React.

It’s a set of React components that have Material Design styles.

In this article, we’ll look at how to get started with Material Design.

Installation

We can install the package by running:

npm install @material-ui/core

with NPM or:

yarn add @material-ui/core

to install it with Yarn.

We can also add the Roboto font by writing:

<link rel="stylesheet" href="https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Roboto:300,400,500,700&display=swap" />

in our HTML.

Material design icons can be added with:

<link rel="stylesheet" href="https://fonts.googleapis.com/icon?family=Material+Icons" />

We can then get started by using some components from the package.

Box

We can make our layout with the Box component.

For example, we can write:

import React from "react";
import Box from "@material-ui/core/Box";
import Button from "@material-ui/core/Button";

export default function App() {
  return (
    <Box component="span" m={1}>
      <Button>foo</Button>
    </Box>
  );
}

to add the Box component for layout with a button inside.

component specifies which component to render as.

We can use clone to call React.cloneElement to clone elements:

import React from "react";
import Box from "@material-ui/core/Box";
import Button from "@material-ui/core/Button";

export default function App() {
  return (
    <Box color="text.primary" clone>
      <Button>foo</Button>
    </Box>
  );
}

#technology #javascript #web-development #software-development #programming #material ui

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Getting Started with Material UI
Shubham Ankit

Shubham Ankit

1657081614

How to Automate Excel with Python | Python Excel Tutorial (OpenPyXL)

How to Automate Excel with Python

In this article, We will show how we can use python to automate Excel . A useful Python library is Openpyxl which we will learn to do Excel Automation

What is OPENPYXL

Openpyxl is a Python library that is used to read from an Excel file or write to an Excel file. Data scientists use Openpyxl for data analysis, data copying, data mining, drawing charts, styling sheets, adding formulas, and more.

Workbook: A spreadsheet is represented as a workbook in openpyxl. A workbook consists of one or more sheets.

Sheet: A sheet is a single page composed of cells for organizing data.

Cell: The intersection of a row and a column is called a cell. Usually represented by A1, B5, etc.

Row: A row is a horizontal line represented by a number (1,2, etc.).

Column: A column is a vertical line represented by a capital letter (A, B, etc.).

Openpyxl can be installed using the pip command and it is recommended to install it in a virtual environment.

pip install openpyxl

CREATE A NEW WORKBOOK

We start by creating a new spreadsheet, which is called a workbook in Openpyxl. We import the workbook module from Openpyxl and use the function Workbook() which creates a new workbook.

from openpyxl
import Workbook
#creates a new workbook
wb = Workbook()
#Gets the first active worksheet
ws = wb.active
#creating new worksheets by using the create_sheet method

ws1 = wb.create_sheet("sheet1", 0) #inserts at first position
ws2 = wb.create_sheet("sheet2") #inserts at last position
ws3 = wb.create_sheet("sheet3", -1) #inserts at penultimate position

#Renaming the sheet
ws.title = "Example"

#save the workbook
wb.save(filename = "example.xlsx")

READING DATA FROM WORKBOOK

We load the file using the function load_Workbook() which takes the filename as an argument. The file must be saved in the same working directory.

#loading a workbook
wb = openpyxl.load_workbook("example.xlsx")

 

GETTING SHEETS FROM THE LOADED WORKBOOK

 

#getting sheet names
wb.sheetnames
result = ['sheet1', 'Sheet', 'sheet3', 'sheet2']

#getting a particular sheet
sheet1 = wb["sheet2"]

#getting sheet title
sheet1.title
result = 'sheet2'

#Getting the active sheet
sheetactive = wb.active
result = 'sheet1'

 

ACCESSING CELLS AND CELL VALUES

 

#get a cell from the sheet
sheet1["A1"] <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A1 >

  #get the cell value
ws["A1"].value 'Segment'

#accessing cell using row and column and assigning a value
d = ws.cell(row = 4, column = 2, value = 10)
d.value
10

 

ITERATING THROUGH ROWS AND COLUMNS

 

#looping through each row and column
for x in range(1, 5):
  for y in range(1, 5):
  print(x, y, ws.cell(row = x, column = y)
    .value)

#getting the highest row number
ws.max_row
701

#getting the highest column number
ws.max_column
19

There are two functions for iterating through rows and columns.

Iter_rows() => returns the rows
Iter_cols() => returns the columns {
  min_row = 4, max_row = 5, min_col = 2, max_col = 5
} => This can be used to set the boundaries
for any iteration.

Example:

#iterating rows
for row in ws.iter_rows(min_row = 2, max_col = 3, max_row = 3):
  for cell in row:
  print(cell) <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.B2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.C2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A3 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.B3 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.C3 >

  #iterating columns
for col in ws.iter_cols(min_row = 2, max_col = 3, max_row = 3):
  for cell in col:
  print(cell) <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A3 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.B2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.B3 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.C2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.C3 >

To get all the rows of the worksheet we use the method worksheet.rows and to get all the columns of the worksheet we use the method worksheet.columns. Similarly, to iterate only through the values we use the method worksheet.values.


Example:

for row in ws.values:
  for value in row:
  print(value)

 

WRITING DATA TO AN EXCEL FILE

Writing to a workbook can be done in many ways such as adding a formula, adding charts, images, updating cell values, inserting rows and columns, etc… We will discuss each of these with an example.

 

CREATING AND SAVING A NEW WORKBOOK

 

#creates a new workbook
wb = openpyxl.Workbook()

#saving the workbook
wb.save("new.xlsx")

 

ADDING AND REMOVING SHEETS

 

#creating a new sheet
ws1 = wb.create_sheet(title = "sheet 2")

#creating a new sheet at index 0
ws2 = wb.create_sheet(index = 0, title = "sheet 0")

#checking the sheet names
wb.sheetnames['sheet 0', 'Sheet', 'sheet 2']

#deleting a sheet
del wb['sheet 0']

#checking sheetnames
wb.sheetnames['Sheet', 'sheet 2']

 

ADDING CELL VALUES

 

#checking the sheet value
ws['B2'].value
null

#adding value to cell
ws['B2'] = 367

#checking value
ws['B2'].value
367

 

ADDING FORMULAS

 

We often require formulas to be included in our Excel datasheet. We can easily add formulas using the Openpyxl module just like you add values to a cell.
 

For example:

import openpyxl
from openpyxl
import Workbook

wb = openpyxl.load_workbook("new1.xlsx")
ws = wb['Sheet']

ws['A9'] = '=SUM(A2:A8)'

wb.save("new2.xlsx")

The above program will add the formula (=SUM(A2:A8)) in cell A9. The result will be as below.

image

 

MERGE/UNMERGE CELLS

Two or more cells can be merged to a rectangular area using the method merge_cells(), and similarly, they can be unmerged using the method unmerge_cells().

For example:
Merge cells

#merge cells B2 to C9
ws.merge_cells('B2:C9')
ws['B2'] = "Merged cells"

Adding the above code to the previous example will merge cells as below.

image

UNMERGE CELLS

 

#unmerge cells B2 to C9
ws.unmerge_cells('B2:C9')

The above code will unmerge cells from B2 to C9.

INSERTING AN IMAGE

To insert an image we import the image function from the module openpyxl.drawing.image. We then load our image and add it to the cell as shown in the below example.

Example:

import openpyxl
from openpyxl
import Workbook
from openpyxl.drawing.image
import Image

wb = openpyxl.load_workbook("new1.xlsx")
ws = wb['Sheet']
#loading the image(should be in same folder)
img = Image('logo.png')
ws['A1'] = "Adding image"
#adjusting size
img.height = 130
img.width = 200
#adding img to cell A3

ws.add_image(img, 'A3')

wb.save("new2.xlsx")

Result:

image

CREATING CHARTS

Charts are essential to show a visualization of data. We can create charts from Excel data using the Openpyxl module chart. Different forms of charts such as line charts, bar charts, 3D line charts, etc., can be created. We need to create a reference that contains the data to be used for the chart, which is nothing but a selection of cells (rows and columns). I am using sample data to create a 3D bar chart in the below example:

Example

import openpyxl
from openpyxl
import Workbook
from openpyxl.chart
import BarChart3D, Reference, series

wb = openpyxl.load_workbook("example.xlsx")
ws = wb.active

values = Reference(ws, min_col = 3, min_row = 2, max_col = 3, max_row = 40)
chart = BarChart3D()
chart.add_data(values)
ws.add_chart(chart, "E3")
wb.save("MyChart.xlsx")

Result
image


How to Automate Excel with Python with Video Tutorial

Welcome to another video! In this video, We will cover how we can use python to automate Excel. I'll be going over everything from creating workbooks to accessing individual cells and stylizing cells. There is a ton of things that you can do with Excel but I'll just be covering the core/base things in OpenPyXl.

⭐️ Timestamps ⭐️
00:00 | Introduction
02:14 | Installing openpyxl
03:19 | Testing Installation
04:25 | Loading an Existing Workbook
06:46 | Accessing Worksheets
07:37 | Accessing Cell Values
08:58 | Saving Workbooks
09:52 | Creating, Listing and Changing Sheets
11:50 | Creating a New Workbook
12:39 | Adding/Appending Rows
14:26 | Accessing Multiple Cells
20:46 | Merging Cells
22:27 | Inserting and Deleting Rows
23:35 | Inserting and Deleting Columns
24:48 | Copying and Moving Cells
26:06 | Practical Example, Formulas & Cell Styling

📄 Resources 📄
OpenPyXL Docs: https://openpyxl.readthedocs.io/en/stable/ 
Code Written in This Tutorial: https://github.com/techwithtim/ExcelPythonTutorial 
Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/TechWithTim/featured 

#python 

Monty  Boehm

Monty Boehm

1659453850

Twitter.jl: Julia Package to Access Twitter API

Twitter.jl

A Julia package for interacting with the Twitter API.

Twitter.jl is a Julia package to work with the Twitter API v1.1. Currently, only the REST API methods are supported; streaming API endpoints aren't implemented at this time.

All functions have required arguments for those parameters required by Twitter and an options keyword argument to provide a Dict{String, String} of optional parameters Twitter API documentation. Most function calls will return either a Dict or an Array <: TwitterType. Bad requests will return the response code from the API (403, 404, etc).

DataFrame methods are defined for functions returning composite types: Tweets, Places, Lists, and Users.

Authentication

Before one can make use of this package, you must create an application on the Twitter's Developer Platform.

Once your application is approved, you can access your dashboard/portal to grab your authentication credentials from the "Details" tab of the application.

Note that you will also want to ensure that your App has Read / Write OAuth access in order to post tweets. You can find out more about this on Stack Overflow.

Installation

To install this package, enter ] on the REPL to bring up Julia's package manager. Then add the package:

julia> ]
(v1.7) pkg> add Twitter

Tip: Press Ctrl+C to return to the julia> prompt.

Usage

To run Twitter.jl, enter the following command in your Julia REPL

julia> using Twitter

Then the a global variable has to be declared with the twitterauth function. This function holds the consumer_key(API Key), consumer_secret(API Key Secret), oauth_token(Access Token), and oauth_secret(Access Token Secret) respectively.

twitterauth("6nOtpXmf...", # API Key
            "sES5Zlj096S...", # API Key Secret
            "98689850-Hj...", # Access Token
            "UroqCVpWKIt...") # Access Token Secret
  • Ensure you put your credentials in an env file to avoid pushing your secrets to the public 🙀.

Note: This package does not currently support OAuth authentication.

Code examples

See runtests.jl for example function calls.

using Twitter, Test
using JSON, OAuth

# set debugging
ENV["JULIA_DEBUG"]=Twitter

twitterauth(ENV["CONSUMER_KEY"], ENV["CONSUMER_SECRET"], ENV["ACCESS_TOKEN"], ENV["ACCESS_TOKEN_SECRET"])

#get_mentions_timeline
mentions_timeline_default = get_mentions_timeline()
tw = mentions_timeline_default[1]
tw_df = DataFrame(mentions_timeline_default)
@test 0 <= length(mentions_timeline_default) <= 20
@test typeof(mentions_timeline_default) == Vector{Tweets}
@test typeof(tw) == Tweets
@test size(tw_df)[2] == 30

#get_user_timeline
user_timeline_default = get_user_timeline(screen_name = "randyzwitch")
@test typeof(user_timeline_default) == Vector{Tweets}

#get_home_timeline
home_timeline_default = get_home_timeline()
@test typeof(home_timeline_default) == Vector{Tweets}

#get_single_tweet_id
get_tweet_by_id = get_single_tweet_id(id = "434685122671939584")
@test typeof(get_tweet_by_id) == Tweets

#get_search_tweets
duke_tweets = get_search_tweets(q = "#Duke", count = 200)
@test typeof(duke_tweets) <: Dict

#test sending/deleting direct messages
#commenting out because Twitter API changed. Come back to fix
# send_dm = post_direct_messages_send(text = "Testing from Julia, this might disappear later $(time())", screen_name = "randyzwitch")
# get_single_dm = get_direct_messages_show(id = send_dm.id)
# destroy = post_direct_messages_destroy(id = send_dm.id)
# @test typeof(send_dm) == Tweets
# @test typeof(get_single_dm) == Tweets
# @test typeof(destroy) == Tweets

#creating/destroying friendships
add_friend = post_friendships_create(screen_name = "kyrieirving")

unfollow = post_friendships_destroy(screen_name = "kyrieirving")
unfollow_df = DataFrame(unfollow)
@test typeof(add_friend) == Users
@test typeof(unfollow) == Users
@test size(unfollow_df)[2] == 40

# create a cursor for follower ids
follow_cursor_test = get_followers_ids(screen_name = "twitter", count = 10_000)
@test length(follow_cursor_test["ids"]) == 10_000

# create a cursor for friend ids - use barackobama because he follows a lot of accounts!
friend_cursor_test = get_friends_ids(screen_name = "BarackObama", count = 10_000)
@test length(friend_cursor_test["ids"]) == 10_000

# create a test for home timelines
home_t = get_home_timeline(count = 2)
@test length(home_t) > 1

# TEST of cursoring functionality on user timelines
user_t = get_user_timeline(screen_name = "stefanjwojcik", count = 400)
@test length(user_t) == 400
# get the minimum ID of the tweets returned (the earliest)
minid = minimum(x.id for x in user_t);

# now iterate until you hit that tweet: should return 399
# WARNING: current versions of julia cannot use keywords in macros? read here: https://github.com/JuliaLang/julia/pull/29261
# eventually replace since_id = minid
tweets_since = get_user_timeline(screen_name = "stefanjwojcik", count = 400, since_id = 1001808621053898752, include_rts=1)

@test length(tweets_since)>=399

# testing get_mentions_timeline
mentions = get_mentions_timeline(screen_name = "stefanjwojcik", count = 300) 
@test length(mentions) >= 50 #sometimes API doesn't return number requested (twitter API specifies count is the max returned, may be much lower)
@test Tweets<:typeof(mentions[1])

# testing retweets_of_me
my_rts = get_retweets_of_me(count = 300)
@test Tweets<:typeof(my_rts[1])

Want to contribute?

Contributions are welcome! Kindly refer to the contribution guidelines.

Linux: Build Status 

CodeCov: codecov

Author: Randyzwitch
Source Code: https://github.com/randyzwitch/Twitter.jl 
License: View license

#julia #api #twitter 

UI Designer Vs UI Developer

Comparing UI Designers to UI Developers
User interface (UI) designers and developers are directly responsible for the consumer base’s experience using an application or software program. Designers specifically deal with the visual aspects of the program, while developers deal with the overall performance and functionality of the software.
To get in depth knowledge on UI, enrich your skills on UI online training Course

Responsibilities of UI Designers vs. UI Developers
UI designers and developers work in tandem to create a program or application that is easy to understand and operate by their customers or clients. Though there may be some occasional overlap in the duties within the workplace, their designated duties are quite clear and are dependent on the other. UI developers are responsible for the coding and programming in the conception of an application, specifically with regard to how the software operates at the hands of the user. UI designers are in charge of applying their understanding of the program operations to create a visual experience that is most compatible to the program’s functionality.

UI Designers
User interface designers are tasked with understanding the programming language of the application in creation so that they can conceptualize and craft visual aspects that will facilitate usage of the program. They are expected to understand computer programming as well as graphic design due to the demands of their work, since they are in charge of incorporating their designs into the program correctly. Their designs are implemented into the layout, which is typically drafted by the developers, while the style of their designs is contingent on the guidelines given by the directors. Once these designs are finished, they must implement them into the program and run a demo of it for the developers and directors to ensure they met the needs and expectations of the project while ensuring there aren’t any bugs caused from their designs. Get more skills from UI Training

Other responsibilities of UI designers are as follows:

  • Make drafts in graphic design and editing software
  • Select fonts and determine color schemes, for consistency
  • Proficiency in programming codes such as Java or CSS
  • Create storyboards and test runs of animated, visual concepts

UI Developers
User interface developers are responsible for the functional aspects of a software application, coding and programming throughout all stages of development with the clients and potential users of the application in mind. They usually begin the process by incorporating the clients’ expressed needs into a layout that is modified as progress is made. Once they get the general functions working, the designers will incorporate their visual conceptions into the layout to ensure that the first draft is operational. If there are any bugs or malfunctions to fix, the developers must troubleshoot and patch the application. While doing these tasks, they must take detailed notes of all the progress made to streamline any future updates made to the program, functionally or aesthetically. Learn more from ui design course

UI developers will also be responsible for:

  • Utilizing research data to improve or build onto the design of the application
  • Suggesting any software updates to improve functionality
  • Constructing diagrams that will aide other developers and programmers on the project
  • Performing test runs of the application

#ui design course #ui training #online ui training #ui online course #ui online training #advanced ui design course

UX designer ? UI designer ? UI Developer ?

The UX designer is someone who thinks about what should the user flow be like, which page should lead to which page, when should a confirm popup appear or not appear, should there be a listing page before or after a create-new page, should there be an address field in the page or geolocation is enough to serve the purpose? After brainstorming through each of these and several other questions, the UX designer comes up with something known as wireframes, which in simple terms is just a blueprint of the website/app.
This is image title

To get in-Depth knowledge on UI Design you can enroll for a live demo on UI online training

The UI designer then takes the wireframes and makes them beautiful, also ensuring that the workflow of the product is communicated well to the user. He will add the pixel level details to the wireframes. What should be the font used, what should be the background image, do we need a background image, what should be the foreground color, how big should be the submit button, does it make more sense to have the menu at the bottom of the screen, what should the logo look like? The job of a UI designer is answering all these and thereafter delivering static mockups, using may be Photoshop, Invision and many other design tools.

The UI developer is the one who puts these static mockups in “real code”. They might need skills like HTML CSS , precompilers(like sass or less) , UI frameworks (like bootstrap or foundation), or xml layouts( in case of android UI) or a combined knowledge of all of them with Javascript (in case of react, react native). The result is a beautiful set of screens/pages which can be actually rendered in a browser or a mobile device.Learn more from ui design course

#ui online course #ui design course #ui training #online ui training #ui courses online #ui design classes online

Raleigh  Hayes

Raleigh Hayes

1625509560

Material UI Tutorial | Getting Started

Hello! Today we are having a quick look at material-ui. This is my go-to styling solution for React, it’s super flexible and really easy to use. I hope you enjoy it :)

Useful Links:
GitHub: https://github.com/redhwannacef/youtube-tutorials/tree/master/material-ui-tutorial
Material UI: https://material-ui.com/

Music:
https://youtu.be/7H7fTZmgHbE
Huge thank you to Harris Heller for providing copyright-free music.


Hey everyone! My name is Redhwan Nacef (Red for short). In this channel, I’m hoping to share my thoughts on software engineering, coding, management, and all things tech. I hope you enjoy!

#material ui #material