Grouping AWS Lambda functions with Dashbird Project View

Grouping AWS Lambda functions with Dashbird Project View

Grouping AWS Lambda Functions with Dashbird project view. Project Views are a way to group your Lambda functions freely, to get a metrics dashboard just for this group. You should keep your Lambda functions small and solve exactly one use-case.

One of the serverless best practices is one-purpose functions. You should keep your  Lambda functions small and solve exactly one use-case. This way, you can optimize them better and keep potential  security problems contained. But creating many small functions can get overwhelming quickly. Even small projects can end up with more than 20 Lambda functions.

If your serverless systems get bigger with time and solve more and more use-cases, you tend to have multiple sub-systems that use multiple Lambda functions. This makes it rather hard to stay on top of things in terms of monitoring. You want to know what your whole system does, but you also want insight into your sub-systems. You don’t want one sub-system monitoring data to get mixed up with other sub-systems monitoring data.

As a solution to this problem, Dashbird offers Project Views.

Project Views are a way to group your Lambda functions freely, to get a metrics dashboard just for this group.

You are completely free to assign which Lambda functions will be tracked by one project view. This allows you to group by sub-systems, but it also allows you to group by purpose. You could, for example, create a project view for all your Lambda functions that integrate with third-party APIs to monitor the stability and performance of your external integrations on a cross-project.

Group Your Lambda Functions

If you look at the Dashbird app menu, you find Project Views in the Dashbird console’s sidebar.

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