Christa  Stehr

Christa Stehr

1602949560

Altostra CLI Introduction

Altostra is a developer-first platform, and as such, it’s important to us to provide developers with a CLI to carry out whatever task they need to, right from their terminal.

The Altostra CLI has three primary functions. First and foremost, to be the main tool developers use while working on projects. Then, to serve the automation needs for processes such as CI/CD and scripting. To complete the Altostra experience, provide management capabilities of projects, deployments, environments and policies right in the terminal.

Setting Up

Before installing the Altostra CLI, make sure you have Node.js installed.

The Altostra CLI is available as an NPM package:

$ npm install -g @altostra/cli

Logging in

The CLI requires access to your Altostra account for many of the operations you will use it for. So, let’s login first:

$ alto login

The login process is straightforward. It opens a login page in a browser — if you have logged in to the Altostra Web Console already, you’ll be logged in automatically.

Look around

Let’s now do some common operations to get familiar with the Altostra CLI.

What can you do

Let’s first see what the CLI has to offer:

$ alto --help

For brevity, I’m omitting the output of the command. Go ahead and run it in your terminal to see the full list of commands. You can also read the CLI documentation.

You can quickly access the Altostra docs by running:

$ alto docs

#aws #development #cloud #cli #serverless

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Altostra CLI Introduction

WP-cli: WP-CLI Framework

WP-CLI

WP-CLI is the command-line interface for WordPress. You can update plugins, configure multisite installations and much more, without using a web browser.

Using

WP-CLI provides a command-line interface for many actions you might perform in the WordPress admin. For instance, wp plugin install --activate (doc) lets you install and activate a WordPress plugin:

$ wp plugin install user-switching --activate
Installing User Switching (1.0.9)
Downloading installation package from https://downloads.wordpress.org/plugin/user-switching.1.0.9.zip...
Unpacking the package...
Installing the plugin...
Plugin installed successfully.
Activating 'user-switching'...
Plugin 'user-switching' activated.
Success: Installed 1 of 1 plugins.

WP-CLI also includes commands for many things you can't do in the WordPress admin. For example, wp transient delete --all (doc) lets you delete one or all transients:

$ wp transient delete --all
Success: 34 transients deleted from the database.

For a more complete introduction to using WP-CLI, read the Quick Start guide. Or, catch up with shell friends to learn about helpful command line utilities.

Already feel comfortable with the basics? Jump into the complete list of commands for detailed information on managing themes and plugins, importing and exporting data, performing database search-replace operations and more.

Installing

Downloading the Phar file is our recommended installation method for most users. Should you need, see also our documentation on alternative installation methods (Composer, Homebrew, Docker).

Before installing WP-CLI, please make sure your environment meets the minimum requirements:

  • UNIX-like environment (OS X, Linux, FreeBSD, Cygwin); limited support in Windows environment
  • PHP 5.6 or later
  • WordPress 3.7 or later. Versions older than the latest WordPress release may have degraded functionality

Once you've verified requirements, download the wp-cli.phar file using wget or curl:

curl -O https://raw.githubusercontent.com/wp-cli/builds/gh-pages/phar/wp-cli.phar

Next, check the Phar file to verify that it's working:

php wp-cli.phar --info

To use WP-CLI from the command line by typing wp, make the file executable and move it to somewhere in your PATH. For example:

chmod +x wp-cli.phar
sudo mv wp-cli.phar /usr/local/bin/wp

If WP-CLI was installed successfully, you should see something like this when you run wp --info:

$ wp --info
OS:     Linux 5.10.60.1-microsoft-standard-WSL2 #1 SMP Wed Aug 25 23:20:18 UTC 2021 x86_64
Shell:  /usr/bin/zsh
PHP binary:     /usr/bin/php8.1
PHP version:    8.1.0
php.ini used:   /etc/php/8.1/cli/php.ini
MySQL binary:   /usr/bin/mysql
MySQL version:  mysql  Ver 8.0.27-0ubuntu0.20.04.1 for Linux on x86_64 ((Ubuntu))
SQL modes:
WP-CLI root dir:        /home/wp-cli/
WP-CLI vendor dir:      /home/wp-cli/vendor
WP_CLI phar path:
WP-CLI packages dir:    /home/wp-cli/.wp-cli/packages/
WP-CLI global config:
WP-CLI project config:  /home/wp-cli/wp-cli.yml
WP-CLI version: 2.7.0

Updating

You can update WP-CLI with wp cli update (doc), or by repeating the installation steps.

If WP-CLI is owned by root or another system user, you'll need to run sudo wp cli update.

Want to live life on the edge? Run wp cli update --nightly to use the latest nightly build of WP-CLI. The nightly build is more or less stable enough for you to use in your development environment, and always includes the latest and greatest WP-CLI features.

Tab completions

WP-CLI also comes with a tab completion script for Bash and ZSH. Just download wp-completion.bash and source it from ~/.bash_profile:

source /FULL/PATH/TO/wp-completion.bash

Don't forget to run source ~/.bash_profile afterwards.

If using zsh for your shell, you may need to load and start bashcompinit before sourcing. Put the following in your .zshrc:

autoload bashcompinit
bashcompinit
source /FULL/PATH/TO/wp-completion.bash

Support

WP-CLI's maintainers and contributors have limited availability to address general support questions. The current version of WP-CLI is the only officially supported version.

When looking for support, please first search for your question in these venues:

If you didn't find an answer in one of the venues above, you can:

  • Join the #cli channel in the WordPress.org Slack to chat with whomever might be available at the time. This option is best for quick questions.
  • Post a new thread in the WordPress.org support forum and tag it 'WP-CLI' so it's seen by the community.

GitHub issues are meant for tracking enhancements to and bugs of existing commands, not general support. Before submitting a bug report, please review our best practices to help ensure your issue is addressed in a timely manner.

Please do not ask support questions on Twitter. Twitter isn't an acceptable venue for support because: 1) it's hard to hold conversations in under 280 characters, and 2) Twitter isn't a place where someone with your same question can search for an answer in a prior conversation.

Remember, libre != gratis; the open source license grants you the freedom to use and modify, but not commitments of other people's time. Please be respectful, and set your expectations accordingly.

Extending

A command is the atomic unit of WP-CLI functionality. wp plugin install (doc) is one command. wp plugin activate (doc) is another.

WP-CLI supports registering any callable class, function, or closure as a command. It reads usage details from the callback's PHPdoc. WP_CLI::add_command() (doc) is used for both internal and third-party command registration.

/**
 * Delete an option from the database.
 *
 * Returns an error if the option didn't exist.
 *
 * ## OPTIONS
 *
 * <key>
 * : Key for the option.
 *
 * ## EXAMPLES
 *
 *     $ wp option delete my_option
 *     Success: Deleted 'my_option' option.
 */
$delete_option_cmd = function( $args ) {
    list( $key ) = $args;

    if ( ! delete_option( $key ) ) {
        WP_CLI::error( "Could not delete '$key' option. Does it exist?" );
    } else {
        WP_CLI::success( "Deleted '$key' option." );
    }
};
WP_CLI::add_command( 'option delete', $delete_option_cmd );

WP-CLI comes with dozens of commands. It's easier than it looks to create a custom WP-CLI command. Read the commands cookbook to learn more. Browse the internal API docs to discover a variety of helpful functions you can use in your custom WP-CLI command.

Contributing

We appreciate you taking the initiative to contribute to WP-CLI. It’s because of you, and the community around you, that WP-CLI is such a great project.

Contributing isn’t limited to just code. We encourage you to contribute in the way that best fits your abilities, by writing tutorials, giving a demo at your local meetup, helping other users with their support questions, or revising our documentation.

Read through our contributing guidelines in the handbook for a thorough introduction to how you can get involved. Following these guidelines helps to communicate that you respect the time of other contributors on the project. In turn, they’ll do their best to reciprocate that respect when working with you, across timezones and around the world.

Leadership

WP-CLI has one project maintainer: schlessera.

On occasion, we grant write access to contributors who have demonstrated, over a period of time, that they are capable and invested in moving the project forward.

Read the governance document in the handbook for more operational details about the project.

Credits

Besides the libraries defined in composer.json, we have used code or ideas from the following projects:

Download Details:

Author: WP-cli
Source Code: https://github.com/wp-cli/wp-cli 
License: MIT license

#php #cli #wordpress 

Christa  Stehr

Christa Stehr

1602949560

Altostra CLI Introduction

Altostra is a developer-first platform, and as such, it’s important to us to provide developers with a CLI to carry out whatever task they need to, right from their terminal.

The Altostra CLI has three primary functions. First and foremost, to be the main tool developers use while working on projects. Then, to serve the automation needs for processes such as CI/CD and scripting. To complete the Altostra experience, provide management capabilities of projects, deployments, environments and policies right in the terminal.

Setting Up

Before installing the Altostra CLI, make sure you have Node.js installed.

The Altostra CLI is available as an NPM package:

$ npm install -g @altostra/cli

Logging in

The CLI requires access to your Altostra account for many of the operations you will use it for. So, let’s login first:

$ alto login

The login process is straightforward. It opens a login page in a browser — if you have logged in to the Altostra Web Console already, you’ll be logged in automatically.

Look around

Let’s now do some common operations to get familiar with the Altostra CLI.

What can you do

Let’s first see what the CLI has to offer:

$ alto --help

For brevity, I’m omitting the output of the command. Go ahead and run it in your terminal to see the full list of commands. You can also read the CLI documentation.

You can quickly access the Altostra docs by running:

$ alto docs

#aws #development #cloud #cli #serverless

Cayla  Erdman

Cayla Erdman

1594369800

Introduction to Structured Query Language SQL pdf

SQL stands for Structured Query Language. SQL is a scripting language expected to store, control, and inquiry information put away in social databases. The main manifestation of SQL showed up in 1974, when a gathering in IBM built up the principal model of a social database. The primary business social database was discharged by Relational Software later turning out to be Oracle.

Models for SQL exist. In any case, the SQL that can be utilized on every last one of the major RDBMS today is in various flavors. This is because of two reasons:

1. The SQL order standard is genuinely intricate, and it isn’t handy to actualize the whole standard.

2. Every database seller needs an approach to separate its item from others.

Right now, contrasts are noted where fitting.

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Exploring the New GitHub CLI

Github just released it’s own Command-Line Interface (CLI) so developers can now do everyday GitHub tasks from the terminal. Yay! This means no more squiggling around the UI. With this new CLI, you can now view, create, clone, or fork repositories, create, view, and edit gists, you can also work with pull requests and issues right from the terminal.

Isn’t that awesome?

The motive behind this CLI is to move all of the developer workflow right to the terminal where we were already working with git. Now you might ask, _will it replace the git CLI? _The answer is no. The CLI is meant to integrate well with git, which means your trusty old git isn’t going anywhere. Rather this was one of the motives behind the creation of the GitHub CLI, bringing all your tools to one place to avoid context switching.

_But wait! doesn’t something like this already exists? Yes, yes it does. A GitHub wrapper called _hubwhich is an open-source extension to command-line git, maintained by a GitHub employee, that lets you do everyday GitHub tasks without ever leaving the terminal. Sounds pretty familiar eh? Hub already offers a lot of the things that the Github CLI brings to the table.

So why is GitHub Reinventing the Wheel?

The GitHub team mentions that the primary reason they didn’t build on top of hub was that they didn’t want to wrestle with the 10 odd years of design decisions that hub went through which weren’t really focused on GitHub workflows. They also_ didn’t want to change hub significantly_ because that might upset the already established user base which used hub on a daily basis. They addressed this in a lot more detail in their docs.

So enough talk, let’s see how it actually works. By the end of this article, you should be well on your way to integrating the GitHub CLI in your workflow.

Installation

The first step is installing the CLI. To do that simply follow the install instructions for your operating system given on their official page

#github #cli #cli-tools #open-source #terminal #shell #git #git-workflow

Seamus  Quitzon

Seamus Quitzon

1598240760

Useful command of Angular CLI

I made a small list of commands which use a lot in Angular CLI and I want to share my list with you.

First of all, we need to install Angular CLI.

npm install -g @angular/cli

This command we need to write in terminal or console.

When cli is installed we need to create our first project:

ng new name-of-project

This command will create an empty project for us. If want to use in our project SCSS files instead of CSS,we must write:

ng new name-of-project --style=scss

After project creation, we need to install all packages which contains in packege.json.

npm intall

Now packages are installed and we can run our project:

ng serve

If we want to run and open our project in browser we should use:

ng serve --open 

By default Angular run project on port:4200, if we want to set another port:

ng serve --port=4222

Also we can use both those option in one command:

ng serve --open --port=4222 

Setting the watch option false will stop automatic rebuilds when you change code:

ng serve --watch=false

When running ng serve, the compiled output is served from memory, not from disk. This means that the application being served is not located on disk in the dist folder.

ng serve --poll 1000

Sometimes could be very useful to build project in production mode:

ng build --prod

Also we could use Ahead of Time Compilation which compiles your app at build time:

ng build --prod --aot

It is time to start developing our project, that means we need to create a new component, class, module, or something else. Angular CLI can help us with that:

ng generate component name-of-component

#angular-cli #angular #cli #front-end-development