George  Koelpin

George Koelpin

1597706160

From Caching to CDN: How To Decide Which Way to Go

For content creators and web developers who are seeking to speed up their web pages, learn more about whether CDNs or caching works for you.

In an attempt to speed up their websites, owners are ready to take various measures. When we talk about the speed of a website, most often we mean the speed of its content loading. There are two effective methods to improve the load time — data caching and using a content delivery network (CDN).

Both methods are good in their own way and are used by a variety of web resources. Our article aims to compare them in terms of speed of data load. Our task is not to point you in the right direction, but to provide enough details so that you make an informed choice.

What Is Caching and How Does It Work?

At its core, data caching is the process of storing information from a website on a computer for a specific period of time. Usually, caching employs the part of RAM that is not used. This process starts automatically after the user loads the website page for the first time. Saving content (images, banners, videos, text, and so on) has a positive effect on the speed of its load. And this, in turn, accelerates the speed of site loading. The user no longer needs to wait until they access the source server and receive a response.

This process makes sense not only in terms of improving the user experience but also from the perspective of improving the website’s rank in search engines. For example, Google ranks fast sites higher. Demand for improved caching has resulted in various widgets hitting the market. They promise to make the caching process faster and better. However, often, this only leads to slower loading.

Of course, cached content isn’t stored forever. Usually, owners of web resources set specific caching options, including how long the data should be kept. This is done to free up the RAM space for more recent data.

What Is CDN and How Does It Work?

The way you see information on a website involves several processes. It all starts with your request for data when entering the site. The request travels to the server on which the website is running. The site receives a response from the server and the information appears in front of your eyes. Fast websites ensure that this process is maintained in a second. However, the speed of content loading is affected not only by how well-optimized the site is but also by the physical distance between the user and the server. For example, if you are located in Warsaw and the website's server is in Tokyo, then the request processing may take a longer time (~ 3-4 seconds). Therefore, using CDN image hosting, you can significantly reduce this time.

At its core, CDN is a network of third-party cache servers distributed around the world. They store cached data from multiple websites. Simply put, using a CDN, the website allows its content to be stored in several places around the globe. Expanding on the case above, the request from Warsaw won’t go to Tokyo and back. Instead, it will be sent to a server in Berlin, for example. The distance is reduced significantly and site loads faster (less than a second).

#performance #caching #cdn #website speed #data caching #go

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

From Caching to CDN: How To Decide Which Way to Go

Jason Staurt

1633357429

CDN is a platform for servers distributed over various geographical locations that helps in reducing the delays in loading a web page. Content delivery network virtually reduces the physical distance between the user and the server this what is cdn really means.

George  Koelpin

George Koelpin

1597706160

From Caching to CDN: How To Decide Which Way to Go

For content creators and web developers who are seeking to speed up their web pages, learn more about whether CDNs or caching works for you.

In an attempt to speed up their websites, owners are ready to take various measures. When we talk about the speed of a website, most often we mean the speed of its content loading. There are two effective methods to improve the load time — data caching and using a content delivery network (CDN).

Both methods are good in their own way and are used by a variety of web resources. Our article aims to compare them in terms of speed of data load. Our task is not to point you in the right direction, but to provide enough details so that you make an informed choice.

What Is Caching and How Does It Work?

At its core, data caching is the process of storing information from a website on a computer for a specific period of time. Usually, caching employs the part of RAM that is not used. This process starts automatically after the user loads the website page for the first time. Saving content (images, banners, videos, text, and so on) has a positive effect on the speed of its load. And this, in turn, accelerates the speed of site loading. The user no longer needs to wait until they access the source server and receive a response.

This process makes sense not only in terms of improving the user experience but also from the perspective of improving the website’s rank in search engines. For example, Google ranks fast sites higher. Demand for improved caching has resulted in various widgets hitting the market. They promise to make the caching process faster and better. However, often, this only leads to slower loading.

Of course, cached content isn’t stored forever. Usually, owners of web resources set specific caching options, including how long the data should be kept. This is done to free up the RAM space for more recent data.

What Is CDN and How Does It Work?

The way you see information on a website involves several processes. It all starts with your request for data when entering the site. The request travels to the server on which the website is running. The site receives a response from the server and the information appears in front of your eyes. Fast websites ensure that this process is maintained in a second. However, the speed of content loading is affected not only by how well-optimized the site is but also by the physical distance between the user and the server. For example, if you are located in Warsaw and the website's server is in Tokyo, then the request processing may take a longer time (~ 3-4 seconds). Therefore, using CDN image hosting, you can significantly reduce this time.

At its core, CDN is a network of third-party cache servers distributed around the world. They store cached data from multiple websites. Simply put, using a CDN, the website allows its content to be stored in several places around the globe. Expanding on the case above, the request from Warsaw won’t go to Tokyo and back. Instead, it will be sent to a server in Berlin, for example. The distance is reduced significantly and site loads faster (less than a second).

#performance #caching #cdn #website speed #data caching #go

Fannie  Zemlak

Fannie Zemlak

1599854400

What's new in the go 1.15

Go announced Go 1.15 version on 11 Aug 2020. Highlighted updates and features include Substantial improvements to the Go linker, Improved allocation for small objects at high core counts, X.509 CommonName deprecation, GOPROXY supports skipping proxies that return errors, New embedded tzdata package, Several Core Library improvements and more.

As Go promise for maintaining backward compatibility. After upgrading to the latest Go 1.15 version, almost all existing Golang applications or programs continue to compile and run as older Golang version.

#go #golang #go 1.15 #go features #go improvement #go package #go new features

davis mike

1626331037

Caching In WordPress: What You Need to Learn?

WordPress caching has nothing new to showcase in this context. WordPress websites also run on a specific server system and you have to make sure these servers work well for user engagement. So caching can help your website server work effectively to serve too many visitors collectively. The commonly requested items can be converted into varied copies that the website server doesn’t want to showcase every time to every website visitor. Classification of Caching is usually divided into two kinds. The Client-Side Caching & the Server Side Caching. Where client-side caching has nothing to do with your website, Server Side Caching is usually its opposite. Read more on https://bit.ly/3rbqvVh

#caching plugins #server side caching #client side caching #wordpress websites #wordpress caching

What is Distributed Caching

In this tutorial we are going to learn about what a cache is ? when we are going to use?, and How to use it? in a detailed manner.

So first of all,

What is a Cache?

Imagine that you have a system like this. Client Application request for some results from the server and the server asks those details form the Database. Then Database pullout the results to the Application server. Without pulling data from the Database all the time we can maintain another database/server to store data called Cache. Here there are 2 scenarios that you might want to use a cache.

  • When you requesting for a commonly used data, and every time we ask for those data we need to provide from the Database. Instead of this, you can save those commonly used data in a cache (in-memory cache). Here we can reduce network calls.
  • When you are doing a calculation by getting data from the database. You can reduce the number of calculations here. Store the result in cache and get the value from the cache without doing recomputations all the time. (Example: Assume you have a Student Management System and you need to calculate the average marks for a particular exam for a particular student. Store Average value in cache memory with key-value pair.)
  • We have all servers and they are hitting the database. It’s going to be a lot of loads. Instead of getting one cache, we can use more caches as a distributed system for Avoid load in the Database.

Can we store all the data in the cache?

No! We can’t store all the data in the cache because of multiple reasons.

  • The hardware that we use to make cache memories is much more expensive than a normal database.
  • If you store a ton of data on cache the search time will increase compared to the database.

So that now you know we can store infinite data on the database and we need to store the most valuable data in the cache.

When do you load data into the cache? When do you evict data from the cache?

Loading or Evicting data from the cache is called a Policy. So the cache performance depends on your cache policy. There are a number of policies you can have. The Most popular one is LRU(Least Recently Used).

**LRU **— you can add recently used entries to the bottom of the cache and least recently used entries go to the bottom. If you want to add new entries but the cache is almost full, then you can evict(kick) out those least recently used data.

Image for post

Some other Policies are,

  • Least Recently Used (LRU)
  • First In First Out (FIFO)
  • Random

#distributed-cache #caching-server #redis #caching

Zander  Herzog

Zander Herzog

1596793260

Secure HTTPS servers in Go

In this article, we are going to look at some of the basic APIs of the http package to create and initialize HTTPS servers in Go.

Image for post

(source: unsplash.com)

In the “Simple Hello World Server” lesson, we learned about net/http package, how to create routes and how [ServeMux](https://golang.org/pkg/net/http/#ServeMux) works. In the “Running multiple HTTP servers” lesson, we learned about [Server](https://golang.org/pkg/net/http/#Server) structure and how to run multiple HTTP servers concurrently.

In this lesson, we are going to create an HTTPS server using both Go’s standard server configuration and custom configuration (using [_Server_](https://golang.org/pkg/net/http/#Server) structure). But before this, we need to know what HTTPS really is?

HTTPS is a big topic of discussion in itself. Hence while writing this lesson, I published an article just on “How HTTPS works?”. I advise you to read this lesson first before continuing this article. In this article, I’ve also described the encryption paradigm and SSL certificates generation process.


If we recall the simplest HTTP server example from previous lessons, we only need http.``[ListenAndServe](https://golang.org/pkg/net/http/#ListenAndServe) function to start an HTTP server and http.``[HandleFunc](https://golang.org/pkg/net/http/#HandleFunc) to register a response handler for a particular endpoint.

Image for post

(https://play.golang.org/p/t3sOenOYAzS)

In the example above, when we run the command go run server.go , it will start an HTTP server on port 9000. By visiting http://localhost:9000 URL in a browser, you will be able to see a Hello World! message on the screen.

Image for post

(http://localhost:9000)

As we know, the nil argument to ListenAndServe() call invokes Go to use the [DefaultServeMux](https://golang.org/pkg/net/http/#DefaultServeMux) response multiplexer, which is the default instance of ServeMux structure provided globally by the Go. The HandleFunc() call adds a response handler for a specific route on the multiplexer instance.

The http.ListenAndServe() call uses the Go’s standard HTTP server configuration, however, in the previous lesson, how we can customize a server using [Server](https://golang.org/pkg/net/http/#Server) structure type.

To start an HTTPS server, all we need do is to call ServerAndListenTLS method with some configuration. Just like ServeAndListen method, this method is available on both the http package and the Server structure.

The http.``[ServeAndListenTLS](https://golang.org/pkg/net/http/#ListenAndServeTLS) method uses the Go’s standard server implementation, however, both [Server](https://golang.org/pkg/net/http/#Server) instance and Server.``[ServeAndListenTLS](https://golang.org/pkg/net/http/#Server.ListenAndServeTLS) method can be configured for our needs.

#go-programming-language #go #golang-tutorial #go-programming #golang