TFLearn: Deep learning library featuring a higher-level API for TensorFlow

TFLearn

TFlearn is a modular and transparent deep learning library built on top of Tensorflow. It was designed to provide a higher-level API to TensorFlow in order to facilitate and speed-up experimentations, while remaining fully transparent and compatible with it.

TFLearn features include:

  • Easy-to-use and understand high-level API for implementing deep neural networks, with tutorial and examples.
  • Fast prototyping through highly modular built-in neural network layers, regularizers, optimizers, metrics...
  • Full transparency over Tensorflow. All functions are built over tensors and can be used independently of TFLearn.
  • Powerful helper functions to train any TensorFlow graph, with support of multiple inputs, outputs and optimizers.
  • Easy and beautiful graph visualization, with details about weights, gradients, activations and more...
  • Effortless device placement for using multiple CPU/GPU.

The high-level API currently supports most of recent deep learning models, such as Convolutions, LSTM, BiRNN, BatchNorm, PReLU, Residual networks, Generative networks... In the future, TFLearn is also intended to stay up-to-date with latest deep learning techniques.

Note: Latest TFLearn (v0.5) is only compatible with TensorFlow v2.0 and over.

Overview

# Classification
tflearn.init_graph(num_cores=8, gpu_memory_fraction=0.5)

net = tflearn.input_data(shape=[None, 784])
net = tflearn.fully_connected(net, 64)
net = tflearn.dropout(net, 0.5)
net = tflearn.fully_connected(net, 10, activation='softmax')
net = tflearn.regression(net, optimizer='adam', loss='categorical_crossentropy')

model = tflearn.DNN(net)
model.fit(X, Y)
# Sequence Generation
net = tflearn.input_data(shape=[None, 100, 5000])
net = tflearn.lstm(net, 64)
net = tflearn.dropout(net, 0.5)
net = tflearn.fully_connected(net, 5000, activation='softmax')
net = tflearn.regression(net, optimizer='adam', loss='categorical_crossentropy')

model = tflearn.SequenceGenerator(net, dictionary=idx, seq_maxlen=100)
model.fit(X, Y)
model.generate(50, temperature=1.0)

There are many more examples available here.

Compatibility

TFLearn is based on the original tensorflow v1 graph API. When using TFLearn, make sure to import tensorflow that way:

import tflearn
import tensorflow.compat.v1 as tf

Installation

TensorFlow Installation

TFLearn requires Tensorflow (version 2.0+) to be installed.

To install TensorFlow, simply run:

pip install tensorflow

or, with GPU-support:

pip install tensorflow-gpu

For more details see TensorFlow installation instructions

TFLearn Installation

To install TFLearn, the easiest way is to run

For the bleeding edge version (recommended):

pip install git+https://github.com/tflearn/tflearn.git

For the latest stable version:

pip install tflearn

Otherwise, you can also install from source by running (from source folder):

python setup.py install

Getting Started

See Getting Started with TFLearn to learn about TFLearn basic functionalities or start browsing TFLearn Tutorials.

Examples

There are many neural network implementation available, see Examples.

Documentation

http://tflearn.org/doc_index

Model Visualization

Graph

Graph Visualization

Loss & Accuracy (multiple runs)

Loss Visualization

Layers

Layers Visualization

Download Details:
Author: tflearn
Official Website: https://github.com/tflearn/tflearn 

#tensorflow #tflearn #deeplearning

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

TFLearn: Deep learning library featuring a higher-level API for TensorFlow

Eran Feit

1645213870

Hi,

This is a Python tutorial that walks through, step by step, to detect objects in images and real time video.

The link for the video : https://youtu.be/40_NC2Ahs_8

I also shared the Python code in the video description .

Enjoy

Eran

#Python #openCV #TensorFlow

Marget D

Marget D

1618317562

Top Deep Learning Development Services | Hire Deep Learning Developer

View more: https://www.inexture.com/services/deep-learning-development/

We at Inexture, strategically work on every project we are associated with. We propose a robust set of AI, ML, and DL consulting services. Our virtuoso team of data scientists and developers meticulously work on every project and add a personalized touch to it. Because we keep our clientele aware of everything being done associated with their project so there’s a sense of transparency being maintained. Leverage our services for your next AI project for end-to-end optimum services.

#deep learning development #deep learning framework #deep learning expert #deep learning ai #deep learning services

Dominic  Feeney

Dominic Feeney

1640053320

TFLearn Library - Deep Learning Featuring A Higher-level API for TF

TFLearn: Deep learning library featuring a higher-level API for TensorFlow.

TFlearn is a modular and transparent deep learning library built on top of Tensorflow. It was designed to provide a higher-level API to TensorFlow in order to facilitate and speed-up experimentations, while remaining fully transparent and compatible with it.

TFLearn features include:

  • Easy-to-use and understand high-level API for implementing deep neural networks, with tutorial and examples.
  • Fast prototyping through highly modular built-in neural network layers, regularizers, optimizers, metrics...
  • Full transparency over Tensorflow. All functions are built over tensors and can be used independently of TFLearn.
  • Powerful helper functions to train any TensorFlow graph, with support of multiple inputs, outputs and optimizers.
  • Easy and beautiful graph visualization, with details about weights, gradients, activations and more...
  • Effortless device placement for using multiple CPU/GPU.

The high-level API currently supports most of recent deep learning models, such as Convolutions, LSTM, BiRNN, BatchNorm, PReLU, Residual networks, Generative networks... In the future, TFLearn is also intended to stay up-to-date with latest deep learning techniques.

Note: Latest TFLearn (v0.5) is only compatible with TensorFlow v2.0 and over.

Overview

# Classification
tflearn.init_graph(num_cores=8, gpu_memory_fraction=0.5)

net = tflearn.input_data(shape=[None, 784])
net = tflearn.fully_connected(net, 64)
net = tflearn.dropout(net, 0.5)
net = tflearn.fully_connected(net, 10, activation='softmax')
net = tflearn.regression(net, optimizer='adam', loss='categorical_crossentropy')

model = tflearn.DNN(net)
model.fit(X, Y)
# Sequence Generation
net = tflearn.input_data(shape=[None, 100, 5000])
net = tflearn.lstm(net, 64)
net = tflearn.dropout(net, 0.5)
net = tflearn.fully_connected(net, 5000, activation='softmax')
net = tflearn.regression(net, optimizer='adam', loss='categorical_crossentropy')

model = tflearn.SequenceGenerator(net, dictionary=idx, seq_maxlen=100)
model.fit(X, Y)
model.generate(50, temperature=1.0)

There are many more examples available here.

Compatibility

TFLearn is based on the original tensorflow v1 graph API. When using TFLearn, make sure to import tensorflow that way:

import tflearn
import tensorflow.compat.v1 as tf

Installation

TensorFlow Installation

TFLearn requires Tensorflow (version 2.0+) to be installed.

To install TensorFlow, simply run:

pip install tensorflow

or, with GPU-support:

pip install tensorflow-gpu

For more details see TensorFlow installation instructions

TFLearn Installation

To install TFLearn, the easiest way is to run

For the bleeding edge version (recommended):

pip install git+https://github.com/tflearn/tflearn.git

For the latest stable version:

pip install tflearn

Otherwise, you can also install from source by running (from source folder):

python setup.py install

Getting Started

See Getting Started with TFLearn to learn about TFLearn basic functionalities or start browsing TFLearn Tutorials.

Examples

There are many neural network implementation available, see Examples.

Documentation

http://tflearn.org/doc_index

Model Visualization

Graph

Graph Visualization

Loss & Accuracy (multiple runs)

Loss Visualization

Layers

Layers Visualization

Contributions

This is the first release of TFLearn, if you find any bug, please report it in the GitHub issues section.

Improvements and requests for new features are more than welcome! Do not hesitate to twist and tweak TFLearn, and send pull-requests.

For more info: Contribute to TFLearn.

Download Details:
Author: tflearn
Source Code: https://github.com/tflearn/tflearn
License: View license

#tensorflow #python #api #machine-learning #deep-learning 

Mikel  Okuneva

Mikel Okuneva

1603735200

Top 10 Deep Learning Sessions To Look Forward To At DVDC 2020

The Deep Learning DevCon 2020, DLDC 2020, has exciting talks and sessions around the latest developments in the field of deep learning, that will not only be interesting for professionals of this field but also for the enthusiasts who are willing to make a career in the field of deep learning. The two-day conference scheduled for 29th and 30th October will host paper presentations, tech talks, workshops that will uncover some interesting developments as well as the latest research and advancement of this area. Further to this, with deep learning gaining massive traction, this conference will highlight some fascinating use cases across the world.

Here are ten interesting talks and sessions of DLDC 2020 that one should definitely attend:

Also Read: Why Deep Learning DevCon Comes At The Right Time


Adversarial Robustness in Deep Learning

By Dipanjan Sarkar

**About: **Adversarial Robustness in Deep Learning is a session presented by Dipanjan Sarkar, a Data Science Lead at Applied Materials, as well as a Google Developer Expert in Machine Learning. In this session, he will focus on the adversarial robustness in the field of deep learning, where he talks about its importance, different types of adversarial attacks, and will showcase some ways to train the neural networks with adversarial realisation. Considering abstract deep learning has brought us tremendous achievements in the fields of computer vision and natural language processing, this talk will be really interesting for people working in this area. With this session, the attendees will have a comprehensive understanding of adversarial perturbations in the field of deep learning and ways to deal with them with common recipes.

Read an interview with Dipanjan Sarkar.

Imbalance Handling with Combination of Deep Variational Autoencoder and NEATER

By Divye Singh

**About: **Imbalance Handling with Combination of Deep Variational Autoencoder and NEATER is a paper presentation by Divye Singh, who has a masters in technology degree in Mathematical Modeling and Simulation and has the interest to research in the field of artificial intelligence, learning-based systems, machine learning, etc. In this paper presentation, he will talk about the common problem of class imbalance in medical diagnosis and anomaly detection, and how the problem can be solved with a deep learning framework. The talk focuses on the paper, where he has proposed a synergistic over-sampling method generating informative synthetic minority class data by filtering the noise from the over-sampled examples. Further, he will also showcase the experimental results on several real-life imbalanced datasets to prove the effectiveness of the proposed method for binary classification problems.

Default Rate Prediction Models for Self-Employment in Korea using Ridge, Random Forest & Deep Neural Network

By Dongsuk Hong

About: This is a paper presentation given by Dongsuk Hong, who is a PhD in Computer Science, and works in the big data centre of Korea Credit Information Services. This talk will introduce the attendees with machine learning and deep learning models for predicting self-employment default rates using credit information. He will talk about the study, where the DNN model is implemented for two purposes — a sub-model for the selection of credit information variables; and works for cascading to the final model that predicts default rates. Hong’s main research area is data analysis of credit information, where she is particularly interested in evaluating the performance of prediction models based on machine learning and deep learning. This talk will be interesting for the deep learning practitioners who are willing to make a career in this field.


#opinions #attend dldc 2020 #deep learning #deep learning sessions #deep learning talks #dldc 2020 #top deep learning sessions at dldc 2020 #top deep learning talks at dldc 2020

Top 10 API Security Threats Every API Team Should Know

As more and more data is exposed via APIs either as API-first companies or for the explosion of single page apps/JAMStack, API security can no longer be an afterthought. The hard part about APIs is that it provides direct access to large amounts of data while bypassing browser precautions. Instead of worrying about SQL injection and XSS issues, you should be concerned about the bad actor who was able to paginate through all your customer records and their data.

Typical prevention mechanisms like Captchas and browser fingerprinting won’t work since APIs by design need to handle a very large number of API accesses even by a single customer. So where do you start? The first thing is to put yourself in the shoes of a hacker and then instrument your APIs to detect and block common attacks along with unknown unknowns for zero-day exploits. Some of these are on the OWASP Security API list, but not all.

Insecure pagination and resource limits

Most APIs provide access to resources that are lists of entities such as /users or /widgets. A client such as a browser would typically filter and paginate through this list to limit the number items returned to a client like so:

First Call: GET /items?skip=0&take=10 
Second Call: GET /items?skip=10&take=10

However, if that entity has any PII or other information, then a hacker could scrape that endpoint to get a dump of all entities in your database. This could be most dangerous if those entities accidently exposed PII or other sensitive information, but could also be dangerous in providing competitors or others with adoption and usage stats for your business or provide scammers with a way to get large email lists. See how Venmo data was scraped

A naive protection mechanism would be to check the take count and throw an error if greater than 100 or 1000. The problem with this is two-fold:

  1. For data APIs, legitimate customers may need to fetch and sync a large number of records such as via cron jobs. Artificially small pagination limits can force your API to be very chatty decreasing overall throughput. Max limits are to ensure memory and scalability requirements are met (and prevent certain DDoS attacks), not to guarantee security.
  2. This offers zero protection to a hacker that writes a simple script that sleeps a random delay between repeated accesses.
skip = 0
while True:    response = requests.post('https://api.acmeinc.com/widgets?take=10&skip=' + skip),                      headers={'Authorization': 'Bearer' + ' ' + sys.argv[1]})    print("Fetched 10 items")    sleep(randint(100,1000))    skip += 10

How to secure against pagination attacks

To secure against pagination attacks, you should track how many items of a single resource are accessed within a certain time period for each user or API key rather than just at the request level. By tracking API resource access at the user level, you can block a user or API key once they hit a threshold such as “touched 1,000,000 items in a one hour period”. This is dependent on your API use case and can even be dependent on their subscription with you. Like a Captcha, this can slow down the speed that a hacker can exploit your API, like a Captcha if they have to create a new user account manually to create a new API key.

Insecure API key generation

Most APIs are protected by some sort of API key or JWT (JSON Web Token). This provides a natural way to track and protect your API as API security tools can detect abnormal API behavior and block access to an API key automatically. However, hackers will want to outsmart these mechanisms by generating and using a large pool of API keys from a large number of users just like a web hacker would use a large pool of IP addresses to circumvent DDoS protection.

How to secure against API key pools

The easiest way to secure against these types of attacks is by requiring a human to sign up for your service and generate API keys. Bot traffic can be prevented with things like Captcha and 2-Factor Authentication. Unless there is a legitimate business case, new users who sign up for your service should not have the ability to generate API keys programmatically. Instead, only trusted customers should have the ability to generate API keys programmatically. Go one step further and ensure any anomaly detection for abnormal behavior is done at the user and account level, not just for each API key.

Accidental key exposure

APIs are used in a way that increases the probability credentials are leaked:

  1. APIs are expected to be accessed over indefinite time periods, which increases the probability that a hacker obtains a valid API key that’s not expired. You save that API key in a server environment variable and forget about it. This is a drastic contrast to a user logging into an interactive website where the session expires after a short duration.
  2. The consumer of an API has direct access to the credentials such as when debugging via Postman or CURL. It only takes a single developer to accidently copy/pastes the CURL command containing the API key into a public forum like in GitHub Issues or Stack Overflow.
  3. API keys are usually bearer tokens without requiring any other identifying information. APIs cannot leverage things like one-time use tokens or 2-factor authentication.

If a key is exposed due to user error, one may think you as the API provider has any blame. However, security is all about reducing surface area and risk. Treat your customer data as if it’s your own and help them by adding guards that prevent accidental key exposure.

How to prevent accidental key exposure

The easiest way to prevent key exposure is by leveraging two tokens rather than one. A refresh token is stored as an environment variable and can only be used to generate short lived access tokens. Unlike the refresh token, these short lived tokens can access the resources, but are time limited such as in hours or days.

The customer will store the refresh token with other API keys. Then your SDK will generate access tokens on SDK init or when the last access token expires. If a CURL command gets pasted into a GitHub issue, then a hacker would need to use it within hours reducing the attack vector (unless it was the actual refresh token which is low probability)

Exposure to DDoS attacks

APIs open up entirely new business models where customers can access your API platform programmatically. However, this can make DDoS protection tricky. Most DDoS protection is designed to absorb and reject a large number of requests from bad actors during DDoS attacks but still need to let the good ones through. This requires fingerprinting the HTTP requests to check against what looks like bot traffic. This is much harder for API products as all traffic looks like bot traffic and is not coming from a browser where things like cookies are present.

Stopping DDoS attacks

The magical part about APIs is almost every access requires an API Key. If a request doesn’t have an API key, you can automatically reject it which is lightweight on your servers (Ensure authentication is short circuited very early before later middleware like request JSON parsing). So then how do you handle authenticated requests? The easiest is to leverage rate limit counters for each API key such as to handle X requests per minute and reject those above the threshold with a 429 HTTP response. There are a variety of algorithms to do this such as leaky bucket and fixed window counters.

Incorrect server security

APIs are no different than web servers when it comes to good server hygiene. Data can be leaked due to misconfigured SSL certificate or allowing non-HTTPS traffic. For modern applications, there is very little reason to accept non-HTTPS requests, but a customer could mistakenly issue a non HTTP request from their application or CURL exposing the API key. APIs do not have the protection of a browser so things like HSTS or redirect to HTTPS offer no protection.

How to ensure proper SSL

Test your SSL implementation over at Qualys SSL Test or similar tool. You should also block all non-HTTP requests which can be done within your load balancer. You should also remove any HTTP headers scrub any error messages that leak implementation details. If your API is used only by your own apps or can only be accessed server-side, then review Authoritative guide to Cross-Origin Resource Sharing for REST APIs

Incorrect caching headers

APIs provide access to dynamic data that’s scoped to each API key. Any caching implementation should have the ability to scope to an API key to prevent cross-pollution. Even if you don’t cache anything in your infrastructure, you could expose your customers to security holes. If a customer with a proxy server was using multiple API keys such as one for development and one for production, then they could see cross-pollinated data.

#api management #api security #api best practices #api providers #security analytics #api management policies #api access tokens #api access #api security risks #api access keys

TFLearn: Deep learning library featuring a higher-level API for TensorFlow

TFLearn

TFlearn is a modular and transparent deep learning library built on top of Tensorflow. It was designed to provide a higher-level API to TensorFlow in order to facilitate and speed-up experimentations, while remaining fully transparent and compatible with it.

TFLearn features include:

  • Easy-to-use and understand high-level API for implementing deep neural networks, with tutorial and examples.
  • Fast prototyping through highly modular built-in neural network layers, regularizers, optimizers, metrics...
  • Full transparency over Tensorflow. All functions are built over tensors and can be used independently of TFLearn.
  • Powerful helper functions to train any TensorFlow graph, with support of multiple inputs, outputs and optimizers.
  • Easy and beautiful graph visualization, with details about weights, gradients, activations and more...
  • Effortless device placement for using multiple CPU/GPU.

The high-level API currently supports most of recent deep learning models, such as Convolutions, LSTM, BiRNN, BatchNorm, PReLU, Residual networks, Generative networks... In the future, TFLearn is also intended to stay up-to-date with latest deep learning techniques.

Note: Latest TFLearn (v0.5) is only compatible with TensorFlow v2.0 and over.

Overview

# Classification
tflearn.init_graph(num_cores=8, gpu_memory_fraction=0.5)

net = tflearn.input_data(shape=[None, 784])
net = tflearn.fully_connected(net, 64)
net = tflearn.dropout(net, 0.5)
net = tflearn.fully_connected(net, 10, activation='softmax')
net = tflearn.regression(net, optimizer='adam', loss='categorical_crossentropy')

model = tflearn.DNN(net)
model.fit(X, Y)
# Sequence Generation
net = tflearn.input_data(shape=[None, 100, 5000])
net = tflearn.lstm(net, 64)
net = tflearn.dropout(net, 0.5)
net = tflearn.fully_connected(net, 5000, activation='softmax')
net = tflearn.regression(net, optimizer='adam', loss='categorical_crossentropy')

model = tflearn.SequenceGenerator(net, dictionary=idx, seq_maxlen=100)
model.fit(X, Y)
model.generate(50, temperature=1.0)

There are many more examples available here.

Compatibility

TFLearn is based on the original tensorflow v1 graph API. When using TFLearn, make sure to import tensorflow that way:

import tflearn
import tensorflow.compat.v1 as tf

Installation

TensorFlow Installation

TFLearn requires Tensorflow (version 2.0+) to be installed.

To install TensorFlow, simply run:

pip install tensorflow

or, with GPU-support:

pip install tensorflow-gpu

For more details see TensorFlow installation instructions

TFLearn Installation

To install TFLearn, the easiest way is to run

For the bleeding edge version (recommended):

pip install git+https://github.com/tflearn/tflearn.git

For the latest stable version:

pip install tflearn

Otherwise, you can also install from source by running (from source folder):

python setup.py install

Getting Started

See Getting Started with TFLearn to learn about TFLearn basic functionalities or start browsing TFLearn Tutorials.

Examples

There are many neural network implementation available, see Examples.

Documentation

http://tflearn.org/doc_index

Model Visualization

Graph

Graph Visualization

Loss & Accuracy (multiple runs)

Loss Visualization

Layers

Layers Visualization

Download Details:
Author: tflearn
Official Website: https://github.com/tflearn/tflearn 

#tensorflow #tflearn #deeplearning