Dylan  Iqbal

Dylan Iqbal

1615516263

Hybrid Rendering In Angular | #ngUpdate

In this video Angular team member Mark Thompson will be taking you on a journey to using Hybrid Rendering in Angular. Enjoy!

Angular Universal → https://angular.io/guide/universal
Hybrid Rendering Repo by @mgechev → https://github.com/mgechev/hybrid-rendering

#angular #javascript #web-development

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Hybrid Rendering In Angular | #ngUpdate
Christa  Stehr

Christa Stehr

1598940617

Install Angular - Angular Environment Setup Process

Angular is a TypeScript based framework that works in synchronization with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. To work with angular, domain knowledge of these 3 is required.

  1. Installing Node.js and npm
  2. Installing Angular CLI
  3. Creating workspace
  4. Deploying your First App

In this article, you will get to know about the Angular Environment setup process. After reading this article, you will be able to install, setup, create, and launch your own application in Angular. So let’s start!!!

Angular environment setup

Install Angular in Easy Steps

For Installing Angular on your Machine, there are 2 prerequisites:

  • Node.js
  • npm Package Manager
Node.js

First you need to have Node.js installed as Angular require current, active LTS or maintenance LTS version of Node.js

Download and Install Node.js version suitable for your machine’s operating system.

Npm Package Manager

Angular, Angular CLI and Angular applications are dependent on npm packages. By installing Node.js, you have automatically installed the npm Package manager which will be the base for installing angular in your system. To check the presence of npm client and Angular version check of npm client, run this command:

  1. npm -v

Installing Angular CLI

  • Open Terminal/Command Prompt
  • To install Angular CLI, run the below command:
  1. npm install -g @angular/cli

installing angular CLI

· After executing the command, Angular CLI will get installed within some time. You can check it using the following command

  1. ng --version

Workspace Creation

Now as your Angular CLI is installed, you need to create a workspace to work upon your application. Methods for it are:

  • Using CLI
  • Using Visual Studio Code
1. Using CLI

To create a workspace:

  • Navigate to the desired directory where you want to create your workspace using cd command in the Terminal/Command prompt
  • Then in the directory write this command on your terminal and provide the name of the app which you want to create. In my case I have mentioned DataFlair:
  1. Ng new YourAppName

create angular workspace

  • After running this command, it will prompt you to select from various options about the CSS and other functionalities.

angular CSS options

  • To leave everything to default, simply press the Enter or the Return key.

angular setup

#angular tutorials #angular cli install #angular environment setup #angular version check #download angular #install angular #install angular cli

Beth  Cooper

Beth Cooper

1659694200

Easy Activity Tracking for Models, Similar to Github's Public Activity

PublicActivity

public_activity provides easy activity tracking for your ActiveRecord, Mongoid 3 and MongoMapper models in Rails 3 and 4.

Simply put: it can record what happens in your application and gives you the ability to present those recorded activities to users - in a similar way to how GitHub does it.

!! WARNING: README for unreleased version below. !!

You probably don't want to read the docs for this unreleased version 2.0.

For the stable 1.5.X readme see: https://github.com/chaps-io/public_activity/blob/1-5-stable/README.md

About

Here is a simple example showing what this gem is about:

Example usage

Tutorials

Screencast

Ryan Bates made a great screencast describing how to integrate Public Activity.

Tutorial

A great step-by-step guide on implementing activity feeds using public_activity by Ilya Bodrov.

Online demo

You can see an actual application using this gem here: http://public-activity-example.herokuapp.com/feed

The source code of the demo is hosted here: https://github.com/pokonski/activity_blog

Setup

Gem installation

You can install public_activity as you would any other gem:

gem install public_activity

or in your Gemfile:

gem 'public_activity'

Database setup

By default public_activity uses Active Record. If you want to use Mongoid or MongoMapper as your backend, create an initializer file in your Rails application with the corresponding code inside:

For Mongoid:

# config/initializers/public_activity.rb
PublicActivity.configure do |config|
  config.orm = :mongoid
end

For MongoMapper:

# config/initializers/public_activity.rb
PublicActivity.configure do |config|
  config.orm = :mongo_mapper
end

(ActiveRecord only) Create migration for activities and migrate the database (in your Rails project):

rails g public_activity:migration
rake db:migrate

Model configuration

Include PublicActivity::Model and add tracked to the model you want to keep track of:

For ActiveRecord:

class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked
end

For Mongoid:

class Article
  include Mongoid::Document
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked
end

For MongoMapper:

class Article
  include MongoMapper::Document
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked
end

And now, by default create/update/destroy activities are recorded in activities table. This is all you need to start recording activities for basic CRUD actions.

Optional: If you don't need #tracked but still want the comfort of #create_activity, you can include only the lightweight Common module instead of Model.

Custom activities

You can trigger custom activities by setting all your required parameters and triggering create_activity on the tracked model, like this:

@article.create_activity key: 'article.commented_on', owner: current_user

See this entry http://rubydoc.info/gems/public_activity/PublicActivity/Common:create_activity for more details.

Displaying activities

To display them you simply query the PublicActivity::Activity model:

# notifications_controller.rb
def index
  @activities = PublicActivity::Activity.all
end

And in your views:

<%= render_activities(@activities) %>

Note: render_activities is an alias for render_activity and does the same.

Layouts

You can also pass options to both activity#render and #render_activity methods, which are passed deeper to the internally used render_partial method. A useful example would be to render activities wrapped in layout, which shares common elements of an activity, like a timestamp, owner's avatar etc:

<%= render_activities(@activities, layout: :activity) %>

The activity will be wrapped with the app/views/layouts/_activity.html.erb layout, in the above example.

Important: please note that layouts for activities are also partials. Hence the _ prefix.

Locals

Sometimes, it's desirable to pass additional local variables to partials. It can be done this way:

<%= render_activity(@activity, locals: {friends: current_user.friends}) %>

Note: Before 1.4.0, one could pass variables directly to the options hash for #render_activity and access it from activity parameters. This functionality is retained in 1.4.0 and later, but the :locals method is preferred, since it prevents bugs from shadowing variables from activity parameters in the database.

Activity views

public_activity looks for views in app/views/public_activity.

For example, if you have an activity with :key set to "activity.user.changed_avatar", the gem will look for a partial in app/views/public_activity/user/_changed_avatar.html.(|erb|haml|slim|something_else).

Hint: the "activity." prefix in :key is completely optional and kept for backwards compatibility, you can skip it in new projects.

If you would like to fallback to a partial, you can utilize the fallback parameter to specify the path of a partial to use when one is missing:

<%= render_activity(@activity, fallback: 'default') %>

When used in this manner, if a partial with the specified :key cannot be located it will use the partial defined in the fallback instead. In the example above this would resolve to public_activity/_default.html.(|erb|haml|slim|something_else).

If a view file does not exist then ActionView::MisingTemplate will be raised. If you wish to fallback to the old behaviour and use an i18n based translation in this situation you can specify a :fallback parameter of text to fallback to this mechanism like such:

<%= render_activity(@activity, fallback: :text) %>

i18n

Translations are used by the #text method, to which you can pass additional options in form of a hash. #render method uses translations when view templates have not been provided. You can render pure i18n strings by passing {display: :i18n} to #render_activity or #render.

Translations should be put in your locale .yml files. To render pure strings from I18n Example structure:

activity:
  article:
    create: 'Article has been created'
    update: 'Someone has edited the article'
    destroy: 'Some user removed an article!'

This structure is valid for activities with keys "activity.article.create" or "article.create". As mentioned before, "activity." part of the key is optional.

Testing

For RSpec you can first disable public_activity and add require helper methods in the rails_helper.rb with:

#rails_helper.rb
require 'public_activity/testing'

PublicActivity.enabled = false

In your specs you can then blockwise decide whether to turn public_activity on or off.

# file_spec.rb
PublicActivity.with_tracking do
  # your test code goes here
end

PublicActivity.without_tracking do
  # your test code goes here
end

Documentation

For more documentation go here

Common examples

Set the Activity's owner to current_user by default

You can set up a default value for :owner by doing this:

  1. Include PublicActivity::StoreController in your ApplicationController like this:
class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
  include PublicActivity::StoreController
end
  1. Use Proc in :owner attribute for tracked class method in your desired model. For example:
class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  tracked owner: Proc.new{ |controller, model| controller.current_user }
end

Note: current_user applies to Devise, if you are using a different authentication gem or your own code, change the current_user to a method you use.

Disable tracking for a class or globally

If you need to disable tracking temporarily, for example in tests or db/seeds.rb then you can use PublicActivity.enabled= attribute like below:

# Disable p_a globally
PublicActivity.enabled = false

# Perform some operations that would normally be tracked by p_a:
Article.create(title: 'New article')

# Switch it back on
PublicActivity.enabled = true

You can also disable public_activity for a specific class:

# Disable p_a for Article class
Article.public_activity_off

# p_a will not do anything here:
@article = Article.create(title: 'New article')

# But will be enabled for other classes:
# (creation of the comment will be recorded if you are tracking the Comment class)
@article.comments.create(body: 'some comment!')

# Enable it again for Article:
Article.public_activity_on

Create custom activities

Besides standard, automatic activities created on CRUD actions on your model (deactivatable), you can post your own activities that can be triggered without modifying the tracked model. There are a few ways to do this, as PublicActivity gives three tiers of options to be set.

Instant options

Because every activity needs a key (otherwise: NoKeyProvided is raised), the shortest and minimal way to post an activity is:

@user.create_activity :mood_changed
# the key of the action will be user.mood_changed
@user.create_activity action: :mood_changed # this is exactly the same as above

Besides assigning your key (which is obvious from the code), it will take global options from User class (given in #tracked method during class definition) and overwrite them with instance options (set on @user by #activity method). You can read more about options and how PublicActivity inherits them for you here.

Note the action parameter builds the key like this: "#{model_name}.#{action}". You can read further on options for #create_activity here.

To provide more options, you can do:

@user.create_activity action: 'poke', parameters: {reason: 'bored'}, recipient: @friend, owner: current_user

In this example, we have provided all the things we could for a standard Activity.

Use custom fields on Activity

Besides the few fields that every Activity has (key, owner, recipient, trackable, parameters), you can also set custom fields. This could be very beneficial, as parameters are a serialized hash, which cannot be queried easily from the database. That being said, use custom fields when you know that you will set them very often and search by them (don't forget database indexes :) ).

Set owner and recipient based on associations

class Comment < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked owner: :commenter, recipient: :commentee

  belongs_to :commenter, :class_name => "User"
  belongs_to :commentee, :class_name => "User"
end

Resolve parameters from a Symbol or Proc

class Post < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked only: [:update], parameters: :tracked_values
  
  def tracked_values
   {}.tap do |hash|
     hash[:tags] = tags if tags_changed?
   end
  end
end

Setup

Skip this step if you are using ActiveRecord in Rails 4 or Mongoid

The first step is similar in every ORM available (except mongoid):

PublicActivity::Activity.class_eval do
  attr_accessible :custom_field
end

place this code under config/initializers/public_activity.rb, you have to create it first.

To be able to assign to that field, we need to move it to the mass assignment sanitizer's whitelist.

Migration

If you're using ActiveRecord, you will also need to provide a migration to add the actual field to the Activity. Taken from our tests:

class AddCustomFieldToActivities < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    change_table :activities do |t|
      t.string :custom_field
    end
  end
end

Assigning custom fields

Assigning is done by the same methods that you use for normal parameters: #tracked, #create_activity. You can just pass the name of your custom variable and assign its value. Even better, you can pass it to #tracked to tell us how to harvest your data for custom fields so we can do that for you.

class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked custom_field: proc {|controller, model| controller.some_helper }
end

Help

If you need help with using public_activity please visit our discussion group and ask a question there:

https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!forum/public-activity

Please do not ask general questions in the Github Issues.


Author: public-activity
Source code: https://github.com/public-activity/public_activity
License: MIT license

#ruby  #ruby-on-rails 

Roberta  Ward

Roberta Ward

1593184320

Basics of Angular: Part-1

What is Angular? What it does? How we implement it in a project? So, here are some basics of angular to let you learn more about angular.

Angular is a Typescript-based open-source front-end web application platform. The Angular Team at Google and a community of individuals and corporations lead it. Angular lets you extend HTML’s syntax to express your apps’ components clearly. The angular resolves challenges while developing a single page and cross-platform applications. So, here the meaning of the single-page applications in angular is that the index.html file serves the app. And, the index.html file links other files to it.

We build angular applications with basic concepts which are NgModules. It provides a compilation context for components. At the beginning of an angular project, the command-line interface provides a built-in component which is the root component. But, NgModule can add a number of additional components. These can be created through a template or loaded from a router. This is what a compilation context about.

What is a Component in Angular?

Components are key features in Angular. It controls a patch of the screen called a view. A couple of components that we create on our own helps to build a whole application. In the end, the root component or the app component holds our entire application. The component has its business logic that it does to support the view inside the class. The class interacts with the view through an API of properties and methods. All the components added by us in the application are not linked to the index.html. But, they link to the app.component.html through the selectors. A component can be a component and not only a typescript class by adding a decorator @Component. Then, for further access, a class can import it. The decorator contains some metadata like selector, template, and style. Here’s an example of how a component decorator looks like:

@Component({
    selector: 'app-root',
    templateUrl: 'app.component.html',
    styleUrls: ['app.component.scss']
})

Role of App Module

Modules are the package of functionalities of our app. It gives Angular the information about which features does my app has and what feature it uses. It is an empty Typescript class, but we transform it by adding a decorator @NgModule. So, we have four properties that we set up on the object pass to @NgModule. The four properties are declarations, imports, providers, and bootstrap. All the built-in new components add up to the declarations array in @NgModule.

@NgModule({
declarations: [
  AppComponent,
],
imports: [
  BrowserModule,
  HttpClientModule,
  AppRoutingModule,
  FormsModule
],
bootstrap: [AppComponent]
})

What is Data Binding?

Data Binding is the communication between the Typescript code of the component and the template. So, we have different kinds of data binding given below:

  • When there is a requirement to output data from our Typescript code in the HTML template. String interpolation handles this purpose like {{data}} in HTML file. Property Binding is also used for this purpose like [property] = “data”.
  • When we want to trigger any event like clicking a button. Event Binding works while we react to user events like (event) = “expression”.
  • When we can react to user events and output something at the same time. Two-way Binding is used like [(ngModel)] = “data”.

image for understanding data binding

#angular #javascript #tech blogs #user interface (ui) #angular #angular fundamentals #angular tutorial #basics of angular

Ayyaz Zafar

1624138795

Angular Material Autocomplete - Multiple Use Cases covered

Learn How to use Angular Material Autocomplete Suggestions Search Input. I covered multiple use cases.

Please watch this video. I hope this video would be helpful for you to understand it and use it in your projects

Please subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL5nKCmpReJZZMe9_bYR89w

#angular #angular-material #angular-js #autocomplete #angular-material-autocomplete #angular-tutorial

Hire Hybrid App Developer

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#hire hybrid app developer #hybrid app developer #hybrid app development company #hybrid app development services #hybrid app development #hybrid app