Selenium Grid 4 Tutorial For Distributed Testing

elenium Grid has been an integral part of automation testing, as it lets you perform test case execution on different combinations of browsers, operating systems (or platforms), and machines. It also enables you to perform parallel execution to expedite the cross browser testing process.

Selenium Grid 4, the successor to Selenium Grid 3, has been in the Alpha stage for the last couple of months. The developer community was very excited regarding Selenium 4 (Alpha), and the addition of several useful features such as Selenium 4 Relative Locator has helped accelerate activities related to Selenium test automation. Selenium 4 Alpha features an improved Selenium Grid design; the significant change is the introduction of ‘fully distributed mode.’ In this Selenium 4 tutorial, we take a deep dive into Selenium 4 and the vital architectural differences in comparison to Selenium 3.

#automation #selenium testing #selenium tutorial

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Selenium Grid 4 Tutorial For Distributed Testing
Anthony  Dach

Anthony Dach

1627025027

What's New in Selenium 4?

The newly released Selenium 4 is creating a lot of buzz and the complete testing community is looking forward to exploring its updated features.

Selenium has gone through a tremendous evolution since its introduction and that’s the reason today it is the most popular and powerful automation testing tool. The newly released Selenium 4 is creating a lot of buzz and the complete testing community is looking forward to exploring its updated features.

Before we dive into Selenium 4, let’s have a brief introduction to its previous versions. Selenium 1 was declared as the free open source automation testing framework in the year 2004 consisting of selenium IDE, RC, and web driver. Whereas, the Selenium 2 released in 2011 consisted of the IDE, Web driver, and Grid. The RC server was merged with the web driver, as the web driver facilitated easy automation scripting for the browsers. Selenium 3 was officially released in 2016. One of the most noticeable changes in selenium 3 was the replacement of the selenium core with the web driver-backed option, the introduction of the gecko driver, and W3C web driver integration.

With the aim of executing much seamless, accurate and faster test automation, Selenium 4 was released on 24th April 2019. So let’s unleash all the major features of selenium 4 which sets it apart from the earlier versions delivering better test automation. There are a lot of exciting features in Selenium 4 across the complete suite i.e. Selenium IDE, Webdriver and Grid. In Selenium 4 though the Webdriver captures the spotlight, we will cover the updated features of selenium IDE and selenium grid. So first of all let’s define the different user groups for the Selenium suite.

Selenium is a suite of tools that caters to the various requirements of the project such as:

  • Selenium IDE (Integrated Development Environment) Supports Rapid test development. This record/run tool helps in preparing test cases. Selenium IDE is an easy-to-use tool from the Selenium Test Suite which is used for developing automated test cases for web applications.
  • Selenium Webdriver provides flexible and seamless automation through a friendly and flexible API. It can perform automation in almost all programming languages.
  • The grid helps in providing automation testing by distributing and running the test cases in multiple machines simultaneously.

Let us explore the features of Selenium 4 across the different Selenium Tools.

#selenium #automation testing #selenium automation #selenium automated testing #selenium test automation #selenium 4

Getting Started with Selenium Grid Browser Testing

When performing cross browser testing manually, one roadblock that you might have hit during the verification phase is testing the functionalities of your web application/web product across different operating systems / devices / browsers are the test coverage with respect to time. With thousands of browsers available in the market, automation testing for validating cross browser compatibility has become a necessity.

Referring to automation and considering our love for open-source softwares, it is inevitable to turn a blind eye from one of the most renowned test automation framework called “Selenium”. We have covered automation testing with Selenium WebDriver for cross browser testing previously on our blog where we discussed different variants of Selenium i.e IDE, RC, WebDriver etc and ran our first automation script.

In that article we emphasized the limitation of working with Local Selenium WebDriver. With ‘Local Selenium WebDriver’, you can perform browser compatibility testing ‘only’ on the browsers that are installed on the machine (where testing is performed) i.e. your testing effort is limited to only a certain combination of (device + operating system + browser).

Verification of your web-application/web product with the ‘local’ version of the Selenium WebDriver is not a scalable approach. Some of the problems that you encounter with this kind of setup are:

  • How to verify functionalities on platforms/operating systems which are not installed on the machine? i.e. even if it is a dual-boot machine, you will still have the problem.
  • How to perform automated cross browser testing on browsers with different versions? e.g. your machine can have Firefox version 64.0, but you want to perform the testing on Firefox version 36.0.
  • How to perform cross browser testing of a website on multiple number of browsers? e.g. your machine may not have Opera installed but for the purpose of testing, you would need to install these browsers (unnecessary disk space consumption).
  • How to attain the best performance i.e. parallelization while performing the tests on local machine?

Though local Selenium WebDriver is ideal for testing on a smaller scale, the necessary amount of ‘scalability’ & ‘performance’ can be achieved after you setup a ‘Selenium Grid’.

This article is a Selenium Grid tutorial where you would realize how web-developers and software testers leverage the power of the Selenium Grid setup to perform automated cross browser testing. I will demonstrate you with an example scenario.

We will be making use of the following languages, frameworks & tools (IDE) to write better automation code.

  • Programming Language – Python (Download Link)
  • Test framework – pytest
  • Web application framework – Selenium
  • Integrated Development Environment – Eclipse version 4.90 (Download Link), PyCharm – Community Edition (Download Link)

What Is Selenium Grid?

Selenium Grid is a testing tool (which is a part of the Selenium Suite) that is based on the ‘client-server’ architecture. In Selenium Grid terminology, Client machine is termed as ‘Hub’ and server(s) are termed as ‘Nodes’.

Selenium Grid setup allows you to execute cross browser testing through a variety of different machines across different browsers (as well as different versions of browsers) & different operating systems. Hence, it brings the require amount of ‘parallelism’ & ‘distribution’ to your test execution environment.

A Selenium Grid setup can have only one Hub and ‘n’ number of nodes. The primary job of the ‘hub machine’ is to distribute the test case supplied to the ‘node machine’ which matches the capabilities/requirements required for executing the test case for performing cross browser testing. We would discuss more Hub & Node (which are the core components for the setup of Selenium Grid infrastructure) in further sections.

There are two versions of Selenium Grid available, namely Selenium Grid 2.0 & Selenium Grid 1.0. Selenium Grid 2.0 is most popular amongst automation testers since it supports Selenium RC (Remote Control) and Selenium WebDriver scripts.

Why Selenium Grid Setup Is A Smart Call To Make?

There are a number of benefits of Selenium Grid setup. Here, we have a look at some of the top advantages of Selenium Grid setup as a part of your test execution strategy for performing cross browser testing.

  • Reduced Execution Time – Selenium Grid setup can be used to execute multiple test cases on different browsers (and browser versions) and operating systems. You can also run multiple instances of Selenium RC along with the test configuring combinations. As the tests are executed in ‘parallel’ (scattered across different machines), the overall time consumed for cross browser testing trims down significantly.
  • Scalable & Maintainable – As we know, Selenium Grid setup reduces the amount of time required for ‘parallel testing’ by a huge margin, the entire solution is highly scalable. If you want to perform testing on a ‘new node’ (which could be Operating System/Browser), all it needs are few minor tweaks in the code with respect to the addition of capabilities, and your solution for the new node is ready.
  • Perform Multi-Combination Testing – Using the Hub & Node feature of Selenium Grid setup, you can perform multi-OS, multi-browser, and multi-device verification of your source code.

#selenium #selenium-grid #test-automation #tutorial #testing #selenium-webdriver #good-company #qa

Selenium Grid 4 Tutorial For Distributed Testing

Selenium Grid has been an integral part of automation testing, as it lets you perform test case execution on different combinations of browsers, operating systems (or platforms), and machines. It also enables you to perform parallel execution to expedite the cross-browser testing process.

Selenium Grid 4, the successor to Selenium Grid 3, has been in the Alpha stage for the last couple of months. The developer community was very excited regarding Selenium 4 (Alpha), and the addition of several useful features such as Selenium 4 Relative Locator has helped accelerate activities related to Selenium test automation. Selenium 4 Alpha features an improved Selenium Grid design; the significant change is the introduction of ‘fully distributed mode.’ In this Selenium 4 tutorial, we take a deep dive into Selenium 4 and the vital architectural differences in comparison to Selenium 3.

#tutorial #selenium automation #selenium 4 #selenium #python

Dejah  Reinger

Dejah Reinger

1599859380

How to Do API Testing?

Nowadays API testing is an integral part of testing. There are a lot of tools like postman, insomnia, etc. There are many articles that ask what is API, What is API testing, but the problem is How to do API testing? What I need to validate.

Note: In this article, I am going to use postman assertions for all the examples since it is the most popular tool. But this article is not intended only for the postman tool.

Let’s directly jump to the topic.

Let’s consider you have an API endpoint example http://dzone.com/getuserDetails/{{username}} when you send the get request to that URL it returns the JSON response.

My API endpoint is http://dzone.com/getuserDetails/{{username}}

The response is in JSON format like below

JSON

{
  "jobTitle": "string",
  "userid": "string",
  "phoneNumber": "string",
  "password": "string",
  "email": "user@example.com",
  "firstName": "string",
  "lastName": "string",
  "userName": "string",
  "country": "string",
  "region": "string",
  "city": "string",
  "department": "string",
  "userType": 0
}

In the JSON we can see there are properties and associated values.

Now, For example, if we need details of the user with the username ‘ganeshhegde’ we need to send a **GET **request to **http://dzone.com/getuserDetails/ganeshhegde **

dzone.com

Now there are two scenarios.

1. Valid Usecase: User is available in the database and it returns user details with status code 200

2. Invalid Usecase: User is Unavailable/Invalid user in this case it returns status with code 404 with not found message.

#tutorial #performance #api #test automation #api testing #testing and qa #application programming interface #testing as a service #testing tutorial #api test

Mikel  Okuneva

Mikel Okuneva

1596793726

Where To Learn Test Programming — July 2020 Edition

What do you do when you have lots of free time on your hands? Why not learn test programming strategies and approaches?

When you’re looking for places to learn test programming, Test Automation University has you covered. From API testing through visual validation, you can hone your skills and learn new approaches on TAU.

We introduced five new TAU courses from April through June, and each of them can help you expand your knowledge, learn a new approach, and improve your craft as a test automation engineer. They are:

These courses add to the other three courses we introduced in January through March 2020:

  • IntelliJ for Test Automation Engineers (3 hrs 41 min)
  • Cucumber with JavaScript (1 hr 22 min)
  • Python Programming (2 hrs)

Each of these courses can give you a new set of skills.

Let’s look at each in a little detail.

Mobile Automation With Appium in JavaScript

Orane Findley teaches Mobile Automation with Appium in JavaScript. Orane walks through all the basics of Appium, starting with what it is and where it runs.

javascript

“Appium is an open-source tool for automating native, web, and hybrid applications on different platforms.”

In the introduction, Orane describes the course parts:

  • Setup and Dependencies — installing Appium and setting up your first project
  • Working with elements by finding them, sending values, clicking, and submitting
  • Creating sessions, changing screen orientations, and taking screenshots
  • Timing, including TimeOuts and Implicit Waits
  • Collecting attributes and data from an element
  • Selecting and using element states
  • Reviewing everything to make it all make sense

The first chapter, broken into five parts, gets your system ready for the rest of the course. You’ll download and install a Java Developer Kit, a stable version of Node.js, Android Studio and Emulator (for a mobile device emulator), Visual Studio Code for an IDE, Appium Server, and a sample Appium Android Package Kit. If you get into trouble, you can use the Test Automation University Slack channel to get help from Orane. Each subchapter contains the links to get to the proper software. Finally, Orane has you customize your configuration for the course project.

Chapter 2 deals with elements and screen interactions for your app. You can find elements on the page, interact with those elements, and scroll the page to make other elements visible. Orane breaks the chapter into three distinct subchapters so you can become competent with each part of finding, scrolling, and interacting with the app. The quiz comes at the end of the third subchapter.

The remaining chapters each deal with specific bullets listed above: sessions and screen capture, timing, element attributes, and using element states. The final summary chapter ensures you have internalized the key takeaways from the course. Each of these chapters includes its quiz.

When you complete this course successfully, you will have both a certificate of completion and the code infrastructure available on your system to start testing mobile apps using Appium.

Selenium WebDriver With Python

Andrew Knight, who blogs as The Automation Panda, teaches the course on Selenium WebDriver with Python. As Andrew points out, Python has become a popular language for test automation. If you don’t know Python at all, he points you to Jess Ingrassellino’s great course, Python for Test Programming, also on Test Automation University.

Se

In the first chapter, Andrew has you write your first test. Not in Python, but Gherkin. If you have never used Gherkin syntax, it helps you structure your tests in pseudocode that you can translate into any language of your choice. Andrew points out that it’s important to write your test steps before you write test code — and Gherkin makes this process straightforward.

first test case

The second chapter goes through setting up a pytest, the test framework Andrew uses. He assumes you already have Python 3.8 installed. Depending on your machine, you may need to do some work (Macs come with Python 2.7.16 installed, which is old and won’t work. Andrew also goes through the pip package manager to install pipenv. He gives you a GitHub link to his test code for the project. And, finally, he creates a test using the Gherkin codes as comments to show you how a test runs in pytest.

In the third chapter, you set up Selenium Webdriver to work with specific browsers, then create your test fixture in the pytest. Andrew reminds you to download the appropriate browser driver for the browser you want to test — for example, chromedriver to drive Chrome and geckodriver to drive Firefox. Once you use pipenv to install Selenium, you begin your test fixture. One thing to remember is to call an explicit quit for your webdriver after a test.

Chapter 4 goes through page objects, and how you abstract page object details to simplify your test structure. Chapter 5 goes through element locator structures and how to use these in Python. And, in Chapter 6, Andrew goes through some common webdriver calls and how to use them in your tests. These first six chapters cover the basics of testing with Python and Selenium.

Now that you have the basics down, the final three chapters review some advanced ideas: testing with multiple browsers, handling race conditions, and running your tests in parallel. This course gives you specific skills around Python and Selenium on top of what you can get from the Python for Test Programming course.

#tutorial #performance #testing #automation #test automation #automated testing #visual testing #visual testing best practices #testing tutorial