Exploring the Computational Powers of AWS Lambda

Exploring the Computational Powers of AWS Lambda

AWS Lambda is a cloud-based computing service provided under Amazon’s Web Services. The serverless code-running features of AWS Lambda is enabling global businesses to integrate next-gen technologies and [AI development...

AWS Lambda is a cloud-based computing service provided under Amazon’s Web Services. The serverless code-running features of AWS Lambda is enabling global businesses to integrate next-gen technologies and AI development services into their applications and systems. Amazon Lambda’s function-specific abilities streamline the deployment of machine learning, deep learning, and chatbot development services.

A short and precise definition of AWS Lambda goes as such-
“An event-driven serverless computing platform, which efficiently automates the coding process without provisioning larger servers or infrastructures”

All a user needs to do is write their code and upload it to AWS. The code can be set up to be triggered from other AWS services, or be called directly.

AWS Lambda takes care of server administration, scaling, fault tolerance, security. AWS takes care of server administration, that is, the user never needs to update the underlying OS when updating a path. The code is executed and scaled dynamically based on the requests. And there is no limit to the number of requests – which means that AWS Lambda provides consistent performance by creating as many instances as needed. AWS maintains the computing capacity of the Availability Zones in each region in order to protect our code from a server failure. Also, there is no maintenance window or scheduled downtime with AWS lambda.

AWS Lambda even allows orchestrating multiple functions and flexible resource model. For complex and long-running tasks we can make use of multiple Lambdas with the help of AWS Step Functions. They allow executing collection of Lambdas sequentially or parallelly and even allows error handling. AWS Lambda also allows us to choose the amount of memory we want to allocate to the functions and it automatically allocates proportional – CPU power, network bandwidth, and disk I/O.

Another benefit of AWS Lambda is that the user is charged based on computation time and the number of time the lambda is triggered.

The below diagram summarizes it’s working.

Deploying Machine Learning Models to AWS Lambda
At Oodles, we are constantly exploring new business opportunities to deploy machine learning development services over Amazon Lambda. AWS Lambda can be programmed to be triggered by changes in data, shifts in system state or action by users.

We can use AWS lambda to be triggered immediately after an image is uploaded to the Amazon S3, the lambda can be used to reduce the size of the image, encrypting the image, creating a thumbnail of the image, etc.
AWS Lambda can be used to filter, sort, or perform any other transformation on data.
Create serverless backend to handle mobile, web, Internet of Things and third-party API calls.

AWS Training Online Course - Best AWS Certification - Intellipaat

AWS Training Online Course - Best AWS Certification - Intellipaat

Enroll for best AWS training course with AWS Certification online and placement support. Learn Amazon web services AWS course from certified AWS experts. Enroll Now!

Enroll for best AWS training course with AWS Certification online and placement support. Learn Amazon web services AWS course from certified AWS experts. Enroll Now!

Recursive AWS Lambda Functions in Node.js JavaScript

Recursive AWS Lambda Functions in Node.js JavaScript

AWS Lambda functions are a great way to execute short-running processes without worrying about what hardware they’re going to run on. Sometimes though, we have a requirement to execute a longer-lived process, but unfortunately AWS imposes a 15 minute execution limit.

In this video you’ll learn how to write recursive Node.js JavaScript Lambda functions which call themselves.

AWS Lambda functions are a great way to execute short-running processes without worrying about what hardware they’re going to run on. Sometimes though, we have a requirement to execute a longer-lived process, but unfortunately AWS imposes a 15 minute execution limit.

See the code for this example in the GitHub gist : https://gist.github.com/tkgregory/8cba611bc6edfa3c6744cea97a4662b6

View this video in written format on : https://tomgregory.com/recursive-aws-lambda-functions-in-node-js-javascript/

Create and Deploy AWS and AWS Lambda using Serverless Framework

Create and Deploy AWS and AWS Lambda using Serverless Framework

An introduction to using AWS and AWS Lambda with the Serverless Framework.

AWS - Introduction

The Serverless Framework helps you develop and deploy your AWS Lambda functions, along with the AWS infrastructure resources they require. It's a CLI that offers structure, automation and best practices out-of-the-box, allowing you to focus on building sophisticated, event-driven, serverless architectures, comprised of Functions and Events.

The Serverless Framework is different from other application frameworks because:

  • It manages your code as well as your infrastructure
  • It supports multiple languages (Node.js, Python, Java, and more)
Core Concepts

Here are the Framework's main concepts and how they pertain to AWS and Lambda...

Functions

A Function is an AWS Lambda function. It's an independent unit of deployment, like a microservice. It's merely code, deployed in the cloud, that is most often written to perform a single job such as:

  • *Saving a user to the *database
  • Processing a file in a database
  • Performing a scheduled task

You can perform multiple jobs in your code, but we don't recommend doing that without good reason. Separation of concerns is best and the Framework is designed to help you easily develop and deploy Functions, as well as manage lots of them.

Events

Anything that triggers an AWS Lambda Function to execute is regarded by the Framework as an Event. Events are infrastructure events on AWS such as:

  • An AWS API Gateway HTTP endpoint request (e.g., for a REST API)
  • An AWS S3 bucket upload (e.g., for an image)
  • A CloudWatch timer (e.g., run every 5 minutes)
  • An AWS SNS topic (e.g., a message)
  • A CloudWatch Alert (e.g., something happened)
  • And more...

When you define an event for your AWS Lambda functions in the Serverless Framework, the Framework will automatically create any infrastructure necessary for that event (e.g., an API Gateway endpoint) and configure your AWS Lambda Functions to listen to it.

Resources

Resources are AWS infrastructure components which your Functions use such as:

  • An AWS DynamoDB Table (e.g., for saving Users/Posts/Comments data)
  • An AWS S3 Bucket (e.g., for saving images or files)
  • An AWS SNS Topic (e.g., for sending messages asynchronously)
  • Anything that can be defined in CloudFormation is supported by the Serverless Framework

The Serverless Framework not only deploys your Functions and the Events that trigger them, but it also deploys the AWS infrastructure components your Functions depend upon.

Services

A Service is the Framework's unit of organization. You can think of it as a project file, though you can have multiple services for a single application. It's where you define your Functions, the Events that trigger them, and the Resources your Functions use, all in one file entitled serverless.yml (or serverless.json or serverless.js). It looks like this:

# serverless.yml

service: users

functions: # Your "Functions"
 usersCreate:
 events: # The "Events" that trigger this function
 - http: post users/create
 usersDelete:
 events:
 - http: delete users/delete

resources: # The "Resources" your "Functions" use. Raw AWS CloudFormation goes in here.

When you deploy with the Framework by running serverless deploy, everything in serverless.yml is deployed at once.

Plugins

You can overwrite or extend the functionality of the Framework using Plugins. Every serverless.yml can contain a plugins: property, which features multiple plugins.

# serverless.yml

plugins:
 - serverless-offline
 - serverless-secrets

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