Dylan North

Dylan North

1569339155

Visually test VueJS apps using Cypress.io and Applitools

In my previous post, we explored how easy it is to troubleshoot and fix React bugs fast using React JS, Cypress.io, and Applitools. In this article, I’ll walk you through a complete, step-by-step guide of how to visually test a Vue JS app with Cypress.io and Applitools.

If you’re not already familiar, Applitools is an automated visual regression testing framework. It focuses on the visual aspects of your app — as opposed to functional testing — and plays a major role in exposing the visual differences between baseline snapshots and both current and future snapshots.


You may also like: Sharing data between components using event bus in Vue.js


So, let’s get going. First, make sure you’re familiar with these and have them installed on your machine:

Before we delve into writing code, let’s look at how Applitools and Cypress.io work together.

How Applitools Works With Cypress.io

Cypress.io offers extension points called plugins. Within a plugin, you can hook into and extend Cypress behavior. To read more on developing and building new Cypress plugins, check out this plugin documentation.

Applitools grabs this extension flexibility and builds the Applitools Eyes Cypress SDK as a Cypress.io plugin. Once installed, it adds a few commands to the main cy object. Specifically, it adds three main methods: cy.eyesOpen to start the test, cy.eyesCheckWindow to take screenshots (for each test step), and cy.eyesClose to close the test.

Nothing changes the way you write your tests with Cypress.io. You will have a few additional custom commands at your disposal to use with Applitools.

Let’s switch gears and start coding.

Step by Step Guide

For this demo, I’ve chosen to demonstrate the TodoMVC example, published as part of the examples projects on the Vue JS website.

Let’s follow the steps to run the TodoMVC app and add a few Cypress test cases.

Step 1: Install the Vue CLI 3 on your machine by issuing this command:

npm install -g @vue/cli
# OR
yarn global add @vue/cli

Once the Vue CLI is installed, you can start creating the Vue JS app.

Step 2: Create a VueJS app TodoApp by issuing this command:

vue create todoapp

The CLI asks a few questions to help you customize your app according to your requirements. For the scenario at hand, I will be selecting the following options:

First, select the manual option to allow you to customize the features of this app.

? Please pick a preset: (Use arrow keys)
  default (babel, eslint)
>  Manually select features

By selecting the E2E Testing option now, the Vue CLI will prepare the groundwork for you to write such tests.

? Please pick a preset: Manually select features
? Check the features needed for your project: 
(Press <space> to select, <a> to toggle all, <i> to invert selection)
(*) Babel   ( ) TypeScript   ( ) Progressive Web App (PWA) Support   ( ) Router   ( ) Vuex   ( ) CSS Pre-processors (*) Linter / Formatter   ( ) Unit Testing >(*) E2E Testing ? Check the features needed for your project: Babel, Linter, E2E ? Pick a linter / formatter config: (Use arrow keys)    ESLint with error prevention only    ESLint + Airbnb config    ESLint + Standard config >ESLint + Prettier ? Pick additional lint features: (Press <space> to select, <a> to toggle all, <i> to invert selection) >(*) Lint on save    ( ) Lint and fix on commit

The second to last step allows you to select between two different E2E testing frameworks. For our example, select the Cypress (Chrome only) option. The CLI installs and configures the Cypress environment on your behalf.

? Pick a E2E testing solution: (Use arrow keys)
 >Cypress (Chrome only)    Nightwatch (Selenium-based) ? Where do you prefer placing config for Babel, PostCSS, ESLint, etc.? (Use arrow keys) >In dedicated config files    In package.json

The CLI successfully generates the app, and you can run it by issuing this command:

 $ yarn serve

Step 3: Open the app in your favorite editor. (I personally use Visual Studio Code.) Locate the App.vue file and replace its content with the following:

View the code on Gist.

Step 4: Locate the main.js file and replace its content with the following:

View the code on Gist.

Nothing fancy here. I copied the code from the TodoMVC example and refactored it to fit into a Vue CLI app.

Now, let’s run the app to make sure everything is working. You should be able to see something like this:

Initial application output

_Initial application output_

Step 5: The Vue CLI places the Cypress.io related folders and files under the tests folder. The structure used is the one recommended by Cypress with the minor change of renaming integration folder to specs. Run the Cypress tests by issuing the following command:

yarn test:e2e

The Cypress test runner opens:

Cypress test runner

_Cypress test runner_

The Vue app and Cypress are both up and running. You may safely delete the specs/test.js file.

Time to start writing some E2E tests!

Step 6: Add a new specs/app_spec.js file with the following content:

View the code on Gist.

The single E2E test focuses on testing the functionality of adding a new Todo item. There are many tests that can be written, but for our sake, we will play around with a single E2E test to demonstrate the integration of Applitools with Cypress.io.

The spec file is self-explanatory. There’s just one thing to note here in relation to the selectors used inside cy.get() methods. The best practice is to avoid using IDs and CSS classes to select elements from the DOM. They will make your tests brittle because they’re subject to change. A better approach is to use data-* attributes or actual component names.

Now, switch back to the App.vue file, and go through all the data-* attributes I’ve added to facilitate writing this E2E test.

Step 7: Run the single E2E test by issuing the following command:

npm run test:e2e

Running our first E2E test

_Running our first E2E test_

Great! Our E2E test successfully passes and verifies that the app functions well and can add multiple Todo items without any issues.

E2E tests are sufficient in testing the overall Web app. However, wouldn’t it be beneficial and more effective to complement the E2E tests with visual ones? This adds the value of detecting any visual change or difference upon running E2E regression testing.

Let’s add the Applitools Cypress NPM package to the project.

Step 8: Add the Applitools Eyes Cypress SDK package to the project.

npm install @applitools/eyes.cypress --save-dev

Step 9: Locate the cypress.json file located at the root of the project folder.

Vue CLI has its own folder structure for Cypress folders and files. This special folder structure is different from that of Cypress.io. Applitools follows the same folder structure of Cypress.io. Therefore, we need to do some tweaking for Applitools to run safely inside the Vue CLI project.

Replace the content of the cypress.json file with the following:

{
 "pluginsFile": "tests/e2e/plugins/index.js",
 "baseUrl": "http://localhost:8081",
 "supportFile": "tests/e2e/support/index.js"
}

Step 10: Configure the Applitools Eyes Cypress SDK by issuing the following command:

npx eyes-setup

Now that Applitools Eyes Cypress SDK is well configured, we can start using it in our tests.

Let the visual testing begin!

Step 11: Revisit the specs/app_spec.ts file and replace its content with the following:

View the code on Gist.

The code is self-documented.

To integrate Applitools Eyes Cypress SDK into a spec file, you follow the Workflow below:

Start a new test

cy.eyesOpen({
    appName: '...',
    testName: '...',
    browser: { ... },
});

Take a snapshot (You may repeat this step wherever you want to take a snapshot)

cy.eyesCheckWindow('...');

End the test

cy.eyesClose();

Step 12: Run the spec file by issuing the following command:

npm run test:e2e

Running our second e2e test

_Running our second e2e test_

Notice the Applitools assertions at lines 1, 9, 17, 27, and 28. This type of logging is there to inform you about the steps Applitools is taking while Cypress runs your tests.

Step 13: Check the test run in Applitools Test Manager

Checking test in Applitools Test Manager

_Checking test in Applitools Test Manager_

Clicking on the test name (in this case Add todo items) yields the three snapshots that the Eyes SDK has taken during the running of the test.

The first snapshot is labeled first todo item added. The image shows the first todo item created.

The second snapshot is labeled second todo item added and shows the first and second todo items created.

The third snapshot is labeled third todo item added and displays the first, second, and third todo items created.

Since this is the first run of the test, Applitools will save these as the baseline.

We will simulate a visual difference by changing a CSS selector and let Applitools detect this. Now run the test again and see the results.

Step 14: Let’s assume that the CSS selectors were changed and caused a change in the font-weight of the text inside HTML labels. Add the following CSS selector to App.vue file as follows:

label {
 font-weight: 600;
}

Let’s run the test.

Step 15: Issue the command to run the E2E tests again. The test case fails, and Applitools detects a font-weight change for the labels used to display the todo item text.

Detecting font change for labels

_Detecting font change for labels_

Notice how the Applitools Test Manager recorded the second run of the test case and highlighted the visual difference in the three snapshots.

Step 16: Click on the first snapshot and compare to the baseline.

Comparing baselines

_Comparing baselines_

In case you can’t see both snapshots side by side, locate the View menu and select Show both.

Finishing our test

_Finishing our test_

In addition to the capacity to visually test your Vue JS apps, Applitools offers more functions and features to give you the upper hand in testing your web apps fast and locate the visual differences easily.

To play around with the source code of this article, feel free to grab a copy of the repo here: todomvc-vue.

Conclusion

You now have some insight on how Applitools speeds up your visual testing experience when you’re developing apps with Vue JS.

Happy Testing!

Originally published by Bilal H at dzone.com

#vue-js #javascript

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

 Visually test VueJS apps using Cypress.io and Applitools
Fredy  Larson

Fredy Larson

1595059664

How long does it take to develop/build an app?

With more of us using smartphones, the popularity of mobile applications has exploded. In the digital era, the number of people looking for products and services online is growing rapidly. Smartphone owners look for mobile applications that give them quick access to companies’ products and services. As a result, mobile apps provide customers with a lot of benefits in just one device.

Likewise, companies use mobile apps to increase customer loyalty and improve their services. Mobile Developers are in high demand as companies use apps not only to create brand awareness but also to gather information. For that reason, mobile apps are used as tools to collect valuable data from customers to help companies improve their offer.

There are many types of mobile applications, each with its own advantages. For example, native apps perform better, while web apps don’t need to be customized for the platform or operating system (OS). Likewise, hybrid apps provide users with comfortable user experience. However, you may be wondering how long it takes to develop an app.

To give you an idea of how long the app development process takes, here’s a short guide.

App Idea & Research

app-idea-research

_Average time spent: two to five weeks _

This is the initial stage and a crucial step in setting the project in the right direction. In this stage, you brainstorm ideas and select the best one. Apart from that, you’ll need to do some research to see if your idea is viable. Remember that coming up with an idea is easy; the hard part is to make it a reality.

All your ideas may seem viable, but you still have to run some tests to keep it as real as possible. For that reason, when Web Developers are building a web app, they analyze the available ideas to see which one is the best match for the targeted audience.

Targeting the right audience is crucial when you are developing an app. It saves time when shaping the app in the right direction as you have a clear set of objectives. Likewise, analyzing how the app affects the market is essential. During the research process, App Developers must gather information about potential competitors and threats. This helps the app owners develop strategies to tackle difficulties that come up after the launch.

The research process can take several weeks, but it determines how successful your app can be. For that reason, you must take your time to know all the weaknesses and strengths of the competitors, possible app strategies, and targeted audience.

The outcomes of this stage are app prototypes and the minimum feasible product.

#android app #frontend #ios app #minimum viable product (mvp) #mobile app development #web development #android app development #app development #app development for ios and android #app development process #ios and android app development #ios app development #stages in app development

Chloe  Butler

Chloe Butler

1667425440

Pdf2gerb: Perl Script Converts PDF Files to Gerber format

pdf2gerb

Perl script converts PDF files to Gerber format

Pdf2Gerb generates Gerber 274X photoplotting and Excellon drill files from PDFs of a PCB. Up to three PDFs are used: the top copper layer, the bottom copper layer (for 2-sided PCBs), and an optional silk screen layer. The PDFs can be created directly from any PDF drawing software, or a PDF print driver can be used to capture the Print output if the drawing software does not directly support output to PDF.

The general workflow is as follows:

  1. Design the PCB using your favorite CAD or drawing software.
  2. Print the top and bottom copper and top silk screen layers to a PDF file.
  3. Run Pdf2Gerb on the PDFs to create Gerber and Excellon files.
  4. Use a Gerber viewer to double-check the output against the original PCB design.
  5. Make adjustments as needed.
  6. Submit the files to a PCB manufacturer.

Please note that Pdf2Gerb does NOT perform DRC (Design Rule Checks), as these will vary according to individual PCB manufacturer conventions and capabilities. Also note that Pdf2Gerb is not perfect, so the output files must always be checked before submitting them. As of version 1.6, Pdf2Gerb supports most PCB elements, such as round and square pads, round holes, traces, SMD pads, ground planes, no-fill areas, and panelization. However, because it interprets the graphical output of a Print function, there are limitations in what it can recognize (or there may be bugs).

See docs/Pdf2Gerb.pdf for install/setup, config, usage, and other info.


pdf2gerb_cfg.pm

#Pdf2Gerb config settings:
#Put this file in same folder/directory as pdf2gerb.pl itself (global settings),
#or copy to another folder/directory with PDFs if you want PCB-specific settings.
#There is only one user of this file, so we don't need a custom package or namespace.
#NOTE: all constants defined in here will be added to main namespace.
#package pdf2gerb_cfg;

use strict; #trap undef vars (easier debug)
use warnings; #other useful info (easier debug)


##############################################################################################
#configurable settings:
#change values here instead of in main pfg2gerb.pl file

use constant WANT_COLORS => ($^O !~ m/Win/); #ANSI colors no worky on Windows? this must be set < first DebugPrint() call

#just a little warning; set realistic expectations:
#DebugPrint("${\(CYAN)}Pdf2Gerb.pl ${\(VERSION)}, $^O O/S\n${\(YELLOW)}${\(BOLD)}${\(ITALIC)}This is EXPERIMENTAL software.  \nGerber files MAY CONTAIN ERRORS.  Please CHECK them before fabrication!${\(RESET)}", 0); #if WANT_DEBUG

use constant METRIC => FALSE; #set to TRUE for metric units (only affect final numbers in output files, not internal arithmetic)
use constant APERTURE_LIMIT => 0; #34; #max #apertures to use; generate warnings if too many apertures are used (0 to not check)
use constant DRILL_FMT => '2.4'; #'2.3'; #'2.4' is the default for PCB fab; change to '2.3' for CNC

use constant WANT_DEBUG => 0; #10; #level of debug wanted; higher == more, lower == less, 0 == none
use constant GERBER_DEBUG => 0; #level of debug to include in Gerber file; DON'T USE FOR FABRICATION
use constant WANT_STREAMS => FALSE; #TRUE; #save decompressed streams to files (for debug)
use constant WANT_ALLINPUT => FALSE; #TRUE; #save entire input stream (for debug ONLY)

#DebugPrint(sprintf("${\(CYAN)}DEBUG: stdout %d, gerber %d, want streams? %d, all input? %d, O/S: $^O, Perl: $]${\(RESET)}\n", WANT_DEBUG, GERBER_DEBUG, WANT_STREAMS, WANT_ALLINPUT), 1);
#DebugPrint(sprintf("max int = %d, min int = %d\n", MAXINT, MININT), 1); 

#define standard trace and pad sizes to reduce scaling or PDF rendering errors:
#This avoids weird aperture settings and replaces them with more standardized values.
#(I'm not sure how photoplotters handle strange sizes).
#Fewer choices here gives more accurate mapping in the final Gerber files.
#units are in inches
use constant TOOL_SIZES => #add more as desired
(
#round or square pads (> 0) and drills (< 0):
    .010, -.001,  #tiny pads for SMD; dummy drill size (too small for practical use, but needed so StandardTool will use this entry)
    .031, -.014,  #used for vias
    .041, -.020,  #smallest non-filled plated hole
    .051, -.025,
    .056, -.029,  #useful for IC pins
    .070, -.033,
    .075, -.040,  #heavier leads
#    .090, -.043,  #NOTE: 600 dpi is not high enough resolution to reliably distinguish between .043" and .046", so choose 1 of the 2 here
    .100, -.046,
    .115, -.052,
    .130, -.061,
    .140, -.067,
    .150, -.079,
    .175, -.088,
    .190, -.093,
    .200, -.100,
    .220, -.110,
    .160, -.125,  #useful for mounting holes
#some additional pad sizes without holes (repeat a previous hole size if you just want the pad size):
    .090, -.040,  #want a .090 pad option, but use dummy hole size
    .065, -.040, #.065 x .065 rect pad
    .035, -.040, #.035 x .065 rect pad
#traces:
    .001,  #too thin for real traces; use only for board outlines
    .006,  #minimum real trace width; mainly used for text
    .008,  #mainly used for mid-sized text, not traces
    .010,  #minimum recommended trace width for low-current signals
    .012,
    .015,  #moderate low-voltage current
    .020,  #heavier trace for power, ground (even if a lighter one is adequate)
    .025,
    .030,  #heavy-current traces; be careful with these ones!
    .040,
    .050,
    .060,
    .080,
    .100,
    .120,
);
#Areas larger than the values below will be filled with parallel lines:
#This cuts down on the number of aperture sizes used.
#Set to 0 to always use an aperture or drill, regardless of size.
use constant { MAX_APERTURE => max((TOOL_SIZES)) + .004, MAX_DRILL => -min((TOOL_SIZES)) + .004 }; #max aperture and drill sizes (plus a little tolerance)
#DebugPrint(sprintf("using %d standard tool sizes: %s, max aper %.3f, max drill %.3f\n", scalar((TOOL_SIZES)), join(", ", (TOOL_SIZES)), MAX_APERTURE, MAX_DRILL), 1);

#NOTE: Compare the PDF to the original CAD file to check the accuracy of the PDF rendering and parsing!
#for example, the CAD software I used generated the following circles for holes:
#CAD hole size:   parsed PDF diameter:      error:
#  .014                .016                +.002
#  .020                .02267              +.00267
#  .025                .026                +.001
#  .029                .03167              +.00267
#  .033                .036                +.003
#  .040                .04267              +.00267
#This was usually ~ .002" - .003" too big compared to the hole as displayed in the CAD software.
#To compensate for PDF rendering errors (either during CAD Print function or PDF parsing logic), adjust the values below as needed.
#units are pixels; for example, a value of 2.4 at 600 dpi = .0004 inch, 2 at 600 dpi = .0033"
use constant
{
    HOLE_ADJUST => -0.004 * 600, #-2.6, #holes seemed to be slightly oversized (by .002" - .004"), so shrink them a little
    RNDPAD_ADJUST => -0.003 * 600, #-2, #-2.4, #round pads seemed to be slightly oversized, so shrink them a little
    SQRPAD_ADJUST => +0.001 * 600, #+.5, #square pads are sometimes too small by .00067, so bump them up a little
    RECTPAD_ADJUST => 0, #(pixels) rectangular pads seem to be okay? (not tested much)
    TRACE_ADJUST => 0, #(pixels) traces seemed to be okay?
    REDUCE_TOLERANCE => .001, #(inches) allow this much variation when reducing circles and rects
};

#Also, my CAD's Print function or the PDF print driver I used was a little off for circles, so define some additional adjustment values here:
#Values are added to X/Y coordinates; units are pixels; for example, a value of 1 at 600 dpi would be ~= .002 inch
use constant
{
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MINX => 0,
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MINY => -0.001 * 600, #-1, #circles were a little too high, so nudge them a little lower
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MAXX => +0.001 * 600, #+1, #circles were a little too far to the left, so nudge them a little to the right
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MAXY => 0,
    SUBST_CIRCLE_CLIPRECT => FALSE, #generate circle and substitute for clip rects (to compensate for the way some CAD software draws circles)
    WANT_CLIPRECT => TRUE, #FALSE, #AI doesn't need clip rect at all? should be on normally?
    RECT_COMPLETION => FALSE, #TRUE, #fill in 4th side of rect when 3 sides found
};

#allow .012 clearance around pads for solder mask:
#This value effectively adjusts pad sizes in the TOOL_SIZES list above (only for solder mask layers).
use constant SOLDER_MARGIN => +.012; #units are inches

#line join/cap styles:
use constant
{
    CAP_NONE => 0, #butt (none); line is exact length
    CAP_ROUND => 1, #round cap/join; line overhangs by a semi-circle at either end
    CAP_SQUARE => 2, #square cap/join; line overhangs by a half square on either end
    CAP_OVERRIDE => FALSE, #cap style overrides drawing logic
};
    
#number of elements in each shape type:
use constant
{
    RECT_SHAPELEN => 6, #x0, y0, x1, y1, count, "rect" (start, end corners)
    LINE_SHAPELEN => 6, #x0, y0, x1, y1, count, "line" (line seg)
    CURVE_SHAPELEN => 10, #xstart, ystart, x0, y0, x1, y1, xend, yend, count, "curve" (bezier 2 points)
    CIRCLE_SHAPELEN => 5, #x, y, 5, count, "circle" (center + radius)
};
#const my %SHAPELEN =
#Readonly my %SHAPELEN =>
our %SHAPELEN =
(
    rect => RECT_SHAPELEN,
    line => LINE_SHAPELEN,
    curve => CURVE_SHAPELEN,
    circle => CIRCLE_SHAPELEN,
);

#panelization:
#This will repeat the entire body the number of times indicated along the X or Y axes (files grow accordingly).
#Display elements that overhang PCB boundary can be squashed or left as-is (typically text or other silk screen markings).
#Set "overhangs" TRUE to allow overhangs, FALSE to truncate them.
#xpad and ypad allow margins to be added around outer edge of panelized PCB.
use constant PANELIZE => {'x' => 1, 'y' => 1, 'xpad' => 0, 'ypad' => 0, 'overhangs' => TRUE}; #number of times to repeat in X and Y directions

# Set this to 1 if you need TurboCAD support.
#$turboCAD = FALSE; #is this still needed as an option?

#CIRCAD pad generation uses an appropriate aperture, then moves it (stroke) "a little" - we use this to find pads and distinguish them from PCB holes. 
use constant PAD_STROKE => 0.3; #0.0005 * 600; #units are pixels
#convert very short traces to pads or holes:
use constant TRACE_MINLEN => .001; #units are inches
#use constant ALWAYS_XY => TRUE; #FALSE; #force XY even if X or Y doesn't change; NOTE: needs to be TRUE for all pads to show in FlatCAM and ViewPlot
use constant REMOVE_POLARITY => FALSE; #TRUE; #set to remove subtractive (negative) polarity; NOTE: must be FALSE for ground planes

#PDF uses "points", each point = 1/72 inch
#combined with a PDF scale factor of .12, this gives 600 dpi resolution (1/72 * .12 = 600 dpi)
use constant INCHES_PER_POINT => 1/72; #0.0138888889; #multiply point-size by this to get inches

# The precision used when computing a bezier curve. Higher numbers are more precise but slower (and generate larger files).
#$bezierPrecision = 100;
use constant BEZIER_PRECISION => 36; #100; #use const; reduced for faster rendering (mainly used for silk screen and thermal pads)

# Ground planes and silk screen or larger copper rectangles or circles are filled line-by-line using this resolution.
use constant FILL_WIDTH => .01; #fill at most 0.01 inch at a time

# The max number of characters to read into memory
use constant MAX_BYTES => 10 * M; #bumped up to 10 MB, use const

use constant DUP_DRILL1 => TRUE; #FALSE; #kludge: ViewPlot doesn't load drill files that are too small so duplicate first tool

my $runtime = time(); #Time::HiRes::gettimeofday(); #measure my execution time

print STDERR "Loaded config settings from '${\(__FILE__)}'.\n";
1; #last value must be truthful to indicate successful load


#############################################################################################
#junk/experiment:

#use Package::Constants;
#use Exporter qw(import); #https://perldoc.perl.org/Exporter.html

#my $caller = "pdf2gerb::";

#sub cfg
#{
#    my $proto = shift;
#    my $class = ref($proto) || $proto;
#    my $settings =
#    {
#        $WANT_DEBUG => 990, #10; #level of debug wanted; higher == more, lower == less, 0 == none
#    };
#    bless($settings, $class);
#    return $settings;
#}

#use constant HELLO => "hi there2"; #"main::HELLO" => "hi there";
#use constant GOODBYE => 14; #"main::GOODBYE" => 12;

#print STDERR "read cfg file\n";

#our @EXPORT_OK = Package::Constants->list(__PACKAGE__); #https://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=1072691; NOTE: "_OK" skips short/common names

#print STDERR scalar(@EXPORT_OK) . " consts exported:\n";
#foreach(@EXPORT_OK) { print STDERR "$_\n"; }
#my $val = main::thing("xyz");
#print STDERR "caller gave me $val\n";
#foreach my $arg (@ARGV) { print STDERR "arg $arg\n"; }

Download Details:

Author: swannman
Source Code: https://github.com/swannman/pdf2gerb

License: GPL-3.0 license

#perl 

iOS App Development Agency in the USA

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Whenever a start-up in the USA launch an MVP version of the app they prefer to launch it only for iPhone user because the US has a large market of iPhone users in comparison to Android. The recent phenomenon of Clubhouse is the biggest example.

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View Portfolio https://www.webcluesinfotech.com/portfolio/

#ios app development agency in the usa #ios app development agency #ios app development #ios app #ios #hire ios app developer

iOS App Development Company in India

iOS app development company in India

India is considered the IT hub of the world because of n number of IT infrastructure development services offering companies. In this whole market iOS app development is the leading service offered by agencies across India

Want to develop the iOS app in India

WebClues Infotech with its head office in India has created a huge presence across the world over time and has served clients in all of the major countries around the world. WebClues Infotech with a highly skilled development team of 120+ members can help you deliver a better result at a reasonable cost.

Want to know more about our iOS app development services in India?

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Share your requirements https://www.webcluesinfotech.com/contact-us/

View Portfolio https://www.webcluesinfotech.com/portfolio/

#ios app development company in india #ios app development company #ios app development #ios app #ios #hire ios app developer

Hire iOS App Developer

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#hire ios app developer #ios app development company #ios app development services #ios app development #ios app developer #ios