Marc  Schroeder

Marc Schroeder

1602486283

Gatsby vs. Next vs. Nuxt: Best JavaScript Framework for Server-side Rendering

The key idea behind Server-side rendering is the process of taking a client-side JavaScript framework website and rendering it to static HTML and CSS on the server.

Why is this important?

The answer for a fast-loading website is server-side rendering. So let’s take a moment to talk about the critical path in your website’s first render. The critical path is a reference to the process of delivering the most important pieces of content to the browser, so it can render your page. If we can deliver the most important assets quickly, then the browser can do its job and render the page quickly to the user.

Understand What’s Behind

How fast the browser renders your app depends on how you build it. The first thing the browser receives is an HTML document. This document contains references to other assets — such as images, CSS, and JavaScript. The browser knows to go fetch and download these assets when it parses this HTML document. So, even though the browser has your HTML, it can’t actually render the website until its corresponding CSS has finished parsing.

Once that’s done, the browser goes ahead and renders the page. That means that with just HTML and CSS, the browser can render the page. As we know the browser is good at this, so it does it very fast.

Now, the final part of this process is JavaScript. After the HTML document is parsed, the browser will download your JavaScript files. The download time of a JavaScript file can be significant if the file is large and the network is poor — and the browser needs to parse the JavaScript. On devices with low-powered hardware, this can take quite a bit of effort and time. Also, you could see slow load times if your first render is dependent on JavaScript. JavaScript should be considered an enhancement of HTML and CSS since its loading can be deferred. However, it’s not always that simple. Some websites need complex features that rely heavily on JavaScript — these kinds of websites use JavaScript frameworks.

Here Comes the Server-side Rendering

JavaScript frameworks can be fast if you’re willing to put in the work. We can put this work in with server-side rendering — where we generate the HTML on the server and send that down to the browser.

So, the user sees the HTML version of your app almost immediately, while the JavaScript app boots up in the background. This may not make your page load faster than a non-server-side rendered version, but it does give the user something to see as the JavaScript downloads in the background — a nice benefit.

Surveys and Stats

Before discussing further, let’s see some stats from different online sources.

#javascript #gatsby #next #nuxt #web-development

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

 Gatsby vs. Next vs. Nuxt: Best JavaScript Framework for Server-side Rendering
Marc  Schroeder

Marc Schroeder

1602486283

Gatsby vs. Next vs. Nuxt: Best JavaScript Framework for Server-side Rendering

The key idea behind Server-side rendering is the process of taking a client-side JavaScript framework website and rendering it to static HTML and CSS on the server.

Why is this important?

The answer for a fast-loading website is server-side rendering. So let’s take a moment to talk about the critical path in your website’s first render. The critical path is a reference to the process of delivering the most important pieces of content to the browser, so it can render your page. If we can deliver the most important assets quickly, then the browser can do its job and render the page quickly to the user.

Understand What’s Behind

How fast the browser renders your app depends on how you build it. The first thing the browser receives is an HTML document. This document contains references to other assets — such as images, CSS, and JavaScript. The browser knows to go fetch and download these assets when it parses this HTML document. So, even though the browser has your HTML, it can’t actually render the website until its corresponding CSS has finished parsing.

Once that’s done, the browser goes ahead and renders the page. That means that with just HTML and CSS, the browser can render the page. As we know the browser is good at this, so it does it very fast.

Now, the final part of this process is JavaScript. After the HTML document is parsed, the browser will download your JavaScript files. The download time of a JavaScript file can be significant if the file is large and the network is poor — and the browser needs to parse the JavaScript. On devices with low-powered hardware, this can take quite a bit of effort and time. Also, you could see slow load times if your first render is dependent on JavaScript. JavaScript should be considered an enhancement of HTML and CSS since its loading can be deferred. However, it’s not always that simple. Some websites need complex features that rely heavily on JavaScript — these kinds of websites use JavaScript frameworks.

Here Comes the Server-side Rendering

JavaScript frameworks can be fast if you’re willing to put in the work. We can put this work in with server-side rendering — where we generate the HTML on the server and send that down to the browser.

So, the user sees the HTML version of your app almost immediately, while the JavaScript app boots up in the background. This may not make your page load faster than a non-server-side rendered version, but it does give the user something to see as the JavaScript downloads in the background — a nice benefit.

Surveys and Stats

Before discussing further, let’s see some stats from different online sources.

#javascript #gatsby #next #nuxt #web-development

Top 15 Free JavaScript Frameworks for Web Applications

List of some useful JavaScript Frameworks and libraries for website, web apps, and mobile apps development, that developers should know about to make selection easier.
This article will help you understand the various types of JavaScript Framework available in the market. When it comes to choosing the best platform for you, it’s not only the number of features you need to consider but also its functionality. The ease with which it fits within your project is also an essential factor. The next step is to choose the framework that best fits your company requirements or you can select the best from the list of top web development companies to develop your product based on your requirements.

#javascript frameworks for web applications #web applications development companies #progressive javascript framework #javascript frameworks #javascript #frameworks

Abigale  Yundt

Abigale Yundt

1603336938

What Will Be The Best JavaScript Frameworks in 2021? -

Someone who is beginning their work journey as a developer or software engineer might encounter an issue while selecting which language, framework, or tools they should be trained in or must have knowledge about. A lot of individuals had to go through such a scenario. Since there is a large range of languages and frameworks available in the software development community, there is not a single solution or option. Hence, we have created this list to narrow down your option. In this post, we will talk about various _ JavaScript Frameworks_ that we feel will be the most useful in 2021.

When we are talking about the development of websites, the JavaScript framework comes in the mind quickly for companies and programmers in today’s world. You most likely had a chance to work on one or two of the JavaScript Frameworks that we have mentioned on the list. Go on and learn more about these JavaScript Frameworks.

1. ReactJS

React is the most prominent JS framework since it was launched by Facebook in 2003. The potential to utilize it for native development comes amongst the key benefits of React. A broad community, Facebook support, saturated environments, improved efficiency, and reusable components are the key reasons behind React’s success. React is ideally suited for building SPA or cross-platform applications and designing small business applications.

ReactJS

#javascript #frameworks #javascript #javascript frameworks #mobile application

Hayden Kerr

Hayden Kerr

1593571200

Introduction to Next.js – Next vs. Gatsby vs. CRA

Companies all over the world are using Next.js to build performant, scalable applications. In this introduction, we’ll talk about…

  • 0:00 – Introduction
  • 2:19 – Why Next.js?
  • 3:55 – Case Study
  • 5:06 – Fundamentals of Next
  • 8:30 – Zero-Config approach
  • 10:55 – Server-side rendering
  • 13:54 – Code splitting
  • 19:45 – Next vs. Create React App vs. Gatsby

#next #gatsby #react #javascript #web-development

Next.js on the server-side— notes to self

This is a curation of Next.js documentation, explanations, and advice. With a few code snippets and images to help along the way.

It focusses mainly on how the ‘server-side’ works in Next.js. Spoiler — it can do more than just render HTML

Currently, Next.js latest version is 9.5.

What is Next.js?

It’s a framework for building server-side rendered React applications.

But Next.js is not just for building an application’s frontend, because of its ‘server-side’, it can be used to build a full backend for the application as well.

How does the server-side work?

The ‘server-side’ in Next.js applications can be separated into two parts:

  1. The server-side rendering — how Next.js generates HTML on the server-side and sends it to the client
  2. The backend server — how Next.js supports a backend server and APIs

The server-side rendering (pre-rendering)

Pre-rendering = general term for rendering HTML before it is sent to the client

By default, Next.js will pre-render every page, but can do so in two different ways:

  1. Static generation
  2. Server-side rendering (SSR)

An application can use a combination of these methods, where the method used for a given page is determined by the page’s data requirements — see the ‘data fetching on the server-side’ section below for more details.

**Static generation **means that the HTML is generated once on the server at build-time, and this HTML is reused for each client request.

This is the recommended approach for performance reasons (better caching), however, it comes with some obvious limitations when it comes to fetching data for that page — the data can only be fetched during the application’s build process using the getStaticProps method.

This might be acceptable when the data being fetched does not change often, and/or in scenarios where the user does not always need the most updated data. But often it is crucial that the user is shown a current view of the data, meaning that static generation of pages cannot be used.

**Server-side rendering (SSR) **means that the HTML is generated on the server on each request for the page — the HTML is ‘dynamic’ rather than ‘static’ as it will depend on the data required.

#react #nextjs #server-side-rendering #javascript #javascript-tips