Kennith  Kuhic

Kennith Kuhic

1658523840

Knwl.js: A Natural Language Processor in Javascript

Knwl.js

Knwl.js is a Javascript library that parses through text for dates, times, phone numbers, emails, places, and more.


Project Future

The future of the Knwl.js project: #97


Parser plugins are what make Knwl.js tick and give it new parsing abilities. There are many already available under ./default_plugins for a number of tasks. If you're interested in developing plugins for Knwl.js, ./plugin_development.md is a great place to start.

Installation

Installation instructions are specific to whether you want to run Knwl.js in the browser, or on the server with Node.js.

For Node.js

Install using npm:

	npm install knwl.js

Load the knwl module using require() and create a new Instance.

var Knwl = require("./knwl.js");
	
	var knwlInstance = new Knwl('english');

You can optionally specify a language in the first parameter. This helps plugins identify and better suit particular languages.

Load a parser plugin.

knwlInstance.register('dates', require('./default_plugins/dates'));

The first parameter is the desired label for the plugin. The second parameter is a require() call to load the plugin.

Note: The plugins in the ./default_plugins directory will be loaded automatically.

For the Browser

Note: A packaged version of Knwl.js for the browser with default plugins is available in the ./dist directory.

These steps require the npm package.

Run npm install to install dependencies.

browserify may be used to build a Knwl.js project from Node.js for the browser.

Use the following syntax in the terminal:

./node_modules/.bin/browserify script.js knwl.js > output.js

The script.js file is the Node.js file you wish to package for the browser.

Usage Guide

These steps are the same regardless of whether Knwl.js is running on the server or client.

Initiate Knwl.js on a String.

knwlInstance.init("This is a string. This was written on the 2nd of June, of 2015.");

This line runs the initial parser functions that prepare the String for plugins to use. Plugins will not function without this method first being called on the String.

Initiate a plugin to parse the String.

var dates = knwlInstance.get('dates');

The first parameter of knwl.get() is the name of the parser plugin you're trying to access (make sure you've added the plugin's .js file to the header of the page). The names of all default parser plugins are provided towards the end of this document. If you're using plugins other than the defaults, see their respective documentation.

Anyways, if the parser plugin is found, knwl.get() will return an array of this format:

var results = [
	{ //result
		//plugin-specific properties
		"preview": "This was written on the 2nd of June of 2015.", //the sentence of rough location of the data from the String
		"found": integer //the position (in words) of the result in the String
	}
]

For example, here's what is returned from knwl.get('dates') when called on the previously mentioned String:

[
	{
		"year": 2015,
		"month": 6,
		"day": 2,
		"preview": "This was written on the 2nd of June of 2015.",
		"found": 5
	}
]

Default Plugins

These are automatically loaded by default.

dates.js

knwl.get('dates');
	
	//Returns any dates found in the String.

times.js

knwl.get('times');
	
	//Returns any times found in the String.
	

phones.js

knwl.get('phones')

	//Returns any phone numbers found in the String.

links.js

knwl.get('links')

	//Returns any links found in the String.

emails.js

knwl.get('emails')
	
	//Returns any email addresses found in the String.

places.js

knwl.get('places')

	//Returns any places found in the String.

Experimental Plugins

Notice: These plugins have not been upgraded to the new syntax.

These parser plugins are not as accurate as the default plugins. However, they should be stable (they shouldn't crash the page) to use if you are willing to use them. They are considerably more static and rigid than default plugins.

In the future, some of these plugins may reach a level of accuracy that promotes them from experimental status to the default plugins. However, some will merely stay as experiments.

english.js

knwl.get('english')

	//Returns the simple parts (verb, subject, etc.) of basic sentences found in the String.
	//WARNING: this is a rigid and simplistic plugin, thus it is merely an experiment.

units.js

knwl.get('units')
	
	//Returns any units (grams, pounds, etc.) found in the String.

Developing Parser Plugins

What's awesome about the new version of Knwl.js is that it makes it much easier for anyone with a little knowledge of JS to build plugins. These plugins offer new parsing abilities for Knwl.js that otherwise wouldn't exist.

If you want to try your hand at building plugins for Knwl.js, there's documentation available in plugin_development.md.


Author: benhmoore
Source code: https://github.com/benhmoore/Knwl.js
License: MIT license

#javascipt #machine-learning 

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Buddha Community

Knwl.js: A Natural Language Processor in Javascript

NBB: Ad-hoc CLJS Scripting on Node.js

Nbb

Not babashka. Node.js babashka!?

Ad-hoc CLJS scripting on Node.js.

Status

Experimental. Please report issues here.

Goals and features

Nbb's main goal is to make it easy to get started with ad hoc CLJS scripting on Node.js.

Additional goals and features are:

  • Fast startup without relying on a custom version of Node.js.
  • Small artifact (current size is around 1.2MB).
  • First class macros.
  • Support building small TUI apps using Reagent.
  • Complement babashka with libraries from the Node.js ecosystem.

Requirements

Nbb requires Node.js v12 or newer.

How does this tool work?

CLJS code is evaluated through SCI, the same interpreter that powers babashka. Because SCI works with advanced compilation, the bundle size, especially when combined with other dependencies, is smaller than what you get with self-hosted CLJS. That makes startup faster. The trade-off is that execution is less performant and that only a subset of CLJS is available (e.g. no deftype, yet).

Usage

Install nbb from NPM:

$ npm install nbb -g

Omit -g for a local install.

Try out an expression:

$ nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'
6

And then install some other NPM libraries to use in the script. E.g.:

$ npm install csv-parse shelljs zx

Create a script which uses the NPM libraries:

(ns script
  (:require ["csv-parse/lib/sync$default" :as csv-parse]
            ["fs" :as fs]
            ["path" :as path]
            ["shelljs$default" :as sh]
            ["term-size$default" :as term-size]
            ["zx$default" :as zx]
            ["zx$fs" :as zxfs]
            [nbb.core :refer [*file*]]))

(prn (path/resolve "."))

(prn (term-size))

(println (count (str (fs/readFileSync *file*))))

(prn (sh/ls "."))

(prn (csv-parse "foo,bar"))

(prn (zxfs/existsSync *file*))

(zx/$ #js ["ls"])

Call the script:

$ nbb script.cljs
"/private/tmp/test-script"
#js {:columns 216, :rows 47}
510
#js ["node_modules" "package-lock.json" "package.json" "script.cljs"]
#js [#js ["foo" "bar"]]
true
$ ls
node_modules
package-lock.json
package.json
script.cljs

Macros

Nbb has first class support for macros: you can define them right inside your .cljs file, like you are used to from JVM Clojure. Consider the plet macro to make working with promises more palatable:

(defmacro plet
  [bindings & body]
  (let [binding-pairs (reverse (partition 2 bindings))
        body (cons 'do body)]
    (reduce (fn [body [sym expr]]
              (let [expr (list '.resolve 'js/Promise expr)]
                (list '.then expr (list 'clojure.core/fn (vector sym)
                                        body))))
            body
            binding-pairs)))

Using this macro we can look async code more like sync code. Consider this puppeteer example:

(-> (.launch puppeteer)
      (.then (fn [browser]
               (-> (.newPage browser)
                   (.then (fn [page]
                            (-> (.goto page "https://clojure.org")
                                (.then #(.screenshot page #js{:path "screenshot.png"}))
                                (.catch #(js/console.log %))
                                (.then #(.close browser)))))))))

Using plet this becomes:

(plet [browser (.launch puppeteer)
       page (.newPage browser)
       _ (.goto page "https://clojure.org")
       _ (-> (.screenshot page #js{:path "screenshot.png"})
             (.catch #(js/console.log %)))]
      (.close browser))

See the puppeteer example for the full code.

Since v0.0.36, nbb includes promesa which is a library to deal with promises. The above plet macro is similar to promesa.core/let.

Startup time

$ time nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'
6
nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'   0.17s  user 0.02s system 109% cpu 0.168 total

The baseline startup time for a script is about 170ms seconds on my laptop. When invoked via npx this adds another 300ms or so, so for faster startup, either use a globally installed nbb or use $(npm bin)/nbb script.cljs to bypass npx.

Dependencies

NPM dependencies

Nbb does not depend on any NPM dependencies. All NPM libraries loaded by a script are resolved relative to that script. When using the Reagent module, React is resolved in the same way as any other NPM library.

Classpath

To load .cljs files from local paths or dependencies, you can use the --classpath argument. The current dir is added to the classpath automatically. So if there is a file foo/bar.cljs relative to your current dir, then you can load it via (:require [foo.bar :as fb]). Note that nbb uses the same naming conventions for namespaces and directories as other Clojure tools: foo-bar in the namespace name becomes foo_bar in the directory name.

To load dependencies from the Clojure ecosystem, you can use the Clojure CLI or babashka to download them and produce a classpath:

$ classpath="$(clojure -A:nbb -Spath -Sdeps '{:aliases {:nbb {:replace-deps {com.github.seancorfield/honeysql {:git/tag "v2.0.0-rc5" :git/sha "01c3a55"}}}}}')"

and then feed it to the --classpath argument:

$ nbb --classpath "$classpath" -e "(require '[honey.sql :as sql]) (sql/format {:select :foo :from :bar :where [:= :baz 2]})"
["SELECT foo FROM bar WHERE baz = ?" 2]

Currently nbb only reads from directories, not jar files, so you are encouraged to use git libs. Support for .jar files will be added later.

Current file

The name of the file that is currently being executed is available via nbb.core/*file* or on the metadata of vars:

(ns foo
  (:require [nbb.core :refer [*file*]]))

(prn *file*) ;; "/private/tmp/foo.cljs"

(defn f [])
(prn (:file (meta #'f))) ;; "/private/tmp/foo.cljs"

Reagent

Nbb includes reagent.core which will be lazily loaded when required. You can use this together with ink to create a TUI application:

$ npm install ink

ink-demo.cljs:

(ns ink-demo
  (:require ["ink" :refer [render Text]]
            [reagent.core :as r]))

(defonce state (r/atom 0))

(doseq [n (range 1 11)]
  (js/setTimeout #(swap! state inc) (* n 500)))

(defn hello []
  [:> Text {:color "green"} "Hello, world! " @state])

(render (r/as-element [hello]))

Promesa

Working with callbacks and promises can become tedious. Since nbb v0.0.36 the promesa.core namespace is included with the let and do! macros. An example:

(ns prom
  (:require [promesa.core :as p]))

(defn sleep [ms]
  (js/Promise.
   (fn [resolve _]
     (js/setTimeout resolve ms))))

(defn do-stuff
  []
  (p/do!
   (println "Doing stuff which takes a while")
   (sleep 1000)
   1))

(p/let [a (do-stuff)
        b (inc a)
        c (do-stuff)
        d (+ b c)]
  (prn d))
$ nbb prom.cljs
Doing stuff which takes a while
Doing stuff which takes a while
3

Also see API docs.

Js-interop

Since nbb v0.0.75 applied-science/js-interop is available:

(ns example
  (:require [applied-science.js-interop :as j]))

(def o (j/lit {:a 1 :b 2 :c {:d 1}}))

(prn (j/select-keys o [:a :b])) ;; #js {:a 1, :b 2}
(prn (j/get-in o [:c :d])) ;; 1

Most of this library is supported in nbb, except the following:

  • destructuring using :syms
  • property access using .-x notation. In nbb, you must use keywords.

See the example of what is currently supported.

Examples

See the examples directory for small examples.

Also check out these projects built with nbb:

API

See API documentation.

Migrating to shadow-cljs

See this gist on how to convert an nbb script or project to shadow-cljs.

Build

Prequisites:

  • babashka >= 0.4.0
  • Clojure CLI >= 1.10.3.933
  • Node.js 16.5.0 (lower version may work, but this is the one I used to build)

To build:

  • Clone and cd into this repo
  • bb release

Run bb tasks for more project-related tasks.

Download Details:
Author: borkdude
Download Link: Download The Source Code
Official Website: https://github.com/borkdude/nbb 
License: EPL-1.0

#node #javascript

Ajay Kapoor

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Grokking Call(), Apply() and Bind() Methods in JavaScript

These functions are very important for every JavaScript Developer and are used in almost every JavaScript Library or Framework. Check out the code snippet below.

Taken from the very popular library Lodash

/**
	* Creates a function that invokes `func` with arguments reversed.
	*
	* @since 4.0.0
	* @category Function
	* @param {Function} func The function to flip arguments for.
	* @returns {Function} Returns the new flipped function.
	* @see reverse
	* @example
	*
	* const flipped = flip((...args) => args)
	*
	* flipped('a', 'b', 'c', 'd')
	* // => ['d', 'c', 'b', 'a']
	*/
	function flip(func) {
	  if (typeof func !== 'function') {
	    throw new TypeError('Expected a function')
	  }
	  return function(...args) {
	    return func.apply(this, args.reverse())
	  }
	}

	export default flip

Look at the statement on line 21, return func.apply(this, args.reverse())

In this article, we will have a look at the call()apply() and bind() methods of JavaScript. Basically these 3 methods are used to control the invocation of the function. The call() and apply() were introduced in ECMAScript 3 while bind() was added as a part of ECMAScript 5.

Let us start with an example to understand these.

Suppose you are a student of X university and your professor has asked you to create a math library, for an assignment, which calculates the area of a circle.

const calcArea = {
	  pi: 3.14,
	  area: function(r) {
	    return this.pi * r * r;
	  }
	}

calcArea.area(4); // prints 50.24


You test this and verify its result, it is working fine and you upload the library to portal way before the deadline ends. Then you ask your classmates to test and verify as well, you come to know that that your result and their results mismatches the decimals precision. You check the assignment guidelines, Oh no! The professor asked you to use a constant **pi** with 5 decimals precision. But you used **3.14** and not **3.14159** as the value of pi. Now you cannot re-upload the library as the deadline date was already over. In this situation, **call()** function will save you.

#js #javascript-development #javascript #javascript-interview #javascript-tips

Sival Alethea

Sival Alethea

1624298400

Learn JavaScript - Full Course for Beginners. DO NOT MISS!!!

This complete 134-part JavaScript tutorial for beginners will teach you everything you need to know to get started with the JavaScript programming language.
⭐️Course Contents⭐️
0:00:00 Introduction
0:01:24 Running JavaScript
0:04:23 Comment Your Code
0:05:56 Declare Variables
0:06:15 Storing Values with the Assignment Operator
0:11:31 Initializing Variables with the Assignment Operator
0:11:58 Uninitialized Variables
0:12:40 Case Sensitivity in Variables
0:14:05 Add Two Numbers
0:14:34 Subtract One Number from Another
0:14:52 Multiply Two Numbers
0:15:12 Dividing Numbers
0:15:30 Increment
0:15:58 Decrement
0:16:22 Decimal Numbers
0:16:48 Multiply Two Decimals
0:17:18 Divide Decimals
0:17:33 Finding a Remainder
0:18:22 Augmented Addition
0:19:22 Augmented Subtraction
0:20:18 Augmented Multiplication
0:20:51 Augmented Division
0:21:19 Declare String Variables
0:22:01 Escaping Literal Quotes
0:23:44 Quoting Strings with Single Quotes
0:25:18 Escape Sequences
0:26:46 Plus Operator
0:27:49 Plus Equals Operator
0:29:01 Constructing Strings with Variables
0:30:14 Appending Variables to Strings
0:31:11 Length of a String
0:32:01 Bracket Notation
0:33:27 Understand String Immutability
0:34:23 Find the Nth Character
0:34:51 Find the Last Character
0:35:48 Find the Nth-to-Last Character
0:36:28 Word Blanks
0:40:44 Arrays
0:41:43 Nest Arrays
0:42:33 Access Array Data
0:43:34 Modify Array Data
0:44:48 Access Multi-Dimensional Arrays
0:46:30 push()
0:47:29 pop()
0:48:33 shift()
0:49:23 unshift()
0:50:36 Shopping List
0:51:41 Write Reusable with Functions
0:53:41 Arguments
0:55:43 Global Scope
0:59:31 Local Scope
1:00:46 Global vs Local Scope in Functions
1:02:40 Return a Value from a Function
1:03:55 Undefined Value returned
1:04:52 Assignment with a Returned Value
1:05:52 Stand in Line
1:08:41 Boolean Values
1:09:24 If Statements
1:11:51 Equality Operator
1:13:18 Strict Equality Operator
1:14:43 Comparing different values
1:15:38 Inequality Operator
1:16:20 Strict Inequality Operator
1:17:05 Greater Than Operator
1:17:39 Greater Than Or Equal To Operator
1:18:09 Less Than Operator
1:18:44 Less Than Or Equal To Operator
1:19:17 And Operator
1:20:41 Or Operator
1:21:37 Else Statements
1:22:27 Else If Statements
1:23:30 Logical Order in If Else Statements
1:24:45 Chaining If Else Statements
1:27:45 Golf Code
1:32:15 Switch Statements
1:35:46 Default Option in Switch Statements
1:37:23 Identical Options in Switch Statements
1:39:20 Replacing If Else Chains with Switch
1:41:11 Returning Boolean Values from Functions
1:42:20 Return Early Pattern for Functions
1:43:38 Counting Cards
1:49:11 Build Objects
1:50:46 Dot Notation
1:51:33 Bracket Notation
1:52:47 Variables
1:53:34 Updating Object Properties
1:54:30 Add New Properties to Object
1:55:19 Delete Properties from Object
1:55:54 Objects for Lookups
1:57:43 Testing Objects for Properties
1:59:15 Manipulating Complex Objects
2:01:00 Nested Objects
2:01:53 Nested Arrays
2:03:06 Record Collection
2:10:15 While Loops
2:11:35 For Loops
2:13:56 Odd Numbers With a For Loop
2:15:28 Count Backwards With a For Loop
2:17:08 Iterate Through an Array with a For Loop
2:19:43 Nesting For Loops
2:22:45 Do…While Loops
2:24:12 Profile Lookup
2:28:18 Random Fractions
2:28:54 Random Whole Numbers
2:30:21 Random Whole Numbers within a Range
2:31:46 parseInt Function
2:32:36 parseInt Function with a Radix
2:33:29 Ternary Operator
2:34:57 Multiple Ternary Operators
2:36:57 var vs let
2:39:02 var vs let scopes
2:41:32 const Keyword
2:43:40 Mutate an Array Declared with const
2:44:52 Prevent Object Mutation
2:47:17 Arrow Functions
2:28:24 Arrow Functions with Parameters
2:49:27 Higher Order Arrow Functions
2:53:04 Default Parameters
2:54:00 Rest Operator
2:55:31 Spread Operator
2:57:18 Destructuring Assignment: Objects
3:00:18 Destructuring Assignment: Nested Objects
3:01:55 Destructuring Assignment: Arrays
3:03:40 Destructuring Assignment with Rest Operator to Reassign Array
3:05:05 Destructuring Assignment to Pass an Object
3:06:39 Template Literals
3:10:43 Simple Fields
3:12:24 Declarative Functions
3:12:56 class Syntax
3:15:11 getters and setters
3:20:25 import vs require
3:22:33 export
3:23:40 * to Import
3:24:50 export default
3:25:26 Import a Default Export
📺 The video in this post was made by freeCodeCamp.org
The origin of the article: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PkZNo7MFNFg&list=PLWKjhJtqVAblfum5WiQblKPwIbqYXkDoC&index=4

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Rahul Jangid

1622207074

What is JavaScript - Stackfindover - Blog

Who invented JavaScript, how it works, as we have given information about Programming language in our previous article ( What is PHP ), but today we will talk about what is JavaScript, why JavaScript is used The Answers to all such questions and much other information about JavaScript, you are going to get here today. Hope this information will work for you.

Who invented JavaScript?

JavaScript language was invented by Brendan Eich in 1995. JavaScript is inspired by Java Programming Language. The first name of JavaScript was Mocha which was named by Marc Andreessen, Marc Andreessen is the founder of Netscape and in the same year Mocha was renamed LiveScript, and later in December 1995, it was renamed JavaScript which is still in trend.

What is JavaScript?

JavaScript is a client-side scripting language used with HTML (Hypertext Markup Language). JavaScript is an Interpreted / Oriented language called JS in programming language JavaScript code can be run on any normal web browser. To run the code of JavaScript, we have to enable JavaScript of Web Browser. But some web browsers already have JavaScript enabled.

Today almost all websites are using it as web technology, mind is that there is maximum scope in JavaScript in the coming time, so if you want to become a programmer, then you can be very beneficial to learn JavaScript.

JavaScript Hello World Program

In JavaScript, ‘document.write‘ is used to represent a string on a browser.

<script type="text/javascript">
	document.write("Hello World!");
</script>

How to comment JavaScript code?

  • For single line comment in JavaScript we have to use // (double slashes)
  • For multiple line comments we have to use / * – – * /
<script type="text/javascript">

//single line comment

/* document.write("Hello"); */

</script>

Advantages and Disadvantages of JavaScript

#javascript #javascript code #javascript hello world #what is javascript #who invented javascript