Plotting Google Map using Folium Package in Python

Title: Plotting Google Map using folium package in python

Introduction about Folium:
Folium is built on the data wrangling strengths of the Python ecosystem and the mapping strengths of the Leaflet.js (JavaScript) library. Simply, manipulate your data in Python, then visualize it on a leaflet map via Folium. Folium makes it easy to visualize data that’s been manipulated in Python, on an interactive Leaflet map. This library has a number of built-in tilesets from OpenStreetMap, Mapbox etc.

Installation:
Open command prompt (cmd) and copy and paste the below command to install Folium.
● pip install folium

Plotting Maps with Folium:
Plotting maps with Folium is easier than you think. Folium provides the folium.Map() class which takes location parameter in terms of latitude and longitude and generates a map around it.

Plotting Markers on the Map
Markers are the items used for marking a location on a map. For example, when you use Google Maps for navigation, your location is marked by a marker and your destination is marked by another marker. Markers are among the most important and helpful things on a map.

Folium gives a folium.Marker() class for plotting markers on a map. Just pass the latitude and longitude of the location, mention the popup and tooltip and add it to the map.

Plotting markers is a two-step process. First, you need to create a base map on which your markers will be placed, and then add your markers to it.

Source Code & Link:
Link - https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1wVEtHJhhhuruoUXYRpqdZwQm2AY8-jlR?usp=sharing

#python #google-maps #programming #developer

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Plotting Google Map using Folium Package in Python
Anil  Sakhiya

Anil Sakhiya

1652748716

Exploratory Data Analysis(EDA) with Python

Exploratory Data Analysis Tutorial | Basics of EDA with Python

Exploratory data analysis is used by data scientists to analyze and investigate data sets and summarize their main characteristics, often employing data visualization methods. It helps determine how best to manipulate data sources to get the answers you need, making it easier for data scientists to discover patterns, spot anomalies, test a hypothesis, or check assumptions. EDA is primarily used to see what data can reveal beyond the formal modeling or hypothesis testing task and provides a better understanding of data set variables and the relationships between them. It can also help determine if the statistical techniques you are considering for data analysis are appropriate or not.

🔹 Topics Covered:
00:00:00 Basics of EDA with Python
01:40:10 Multiple Variate Analysis
02:30:26 Outlier Detection
03:44:48 Cricket World Cup Analysis using Exploratory Data Analysis


Learning the basics of Exploratory Data Analysis using Python with Numpy, Matplotlib, and Pandas.

What is Exploratory Data Analysis(EDA)?

If we want to explain EDA in simple terms, it means trying to understand the given data much better, so that we can make some sense out of it.

We can find a more formal definition in Wikipedia.

In statistics, exploratory data analysis is an approach to analyzing data sets to summarize their main characteristics, often with visual methods. A statistical model can be used or not, but primarily EDA is for seeing what the data can tell us beyond the formal modeling or hypothesis testing task.

EDA in Python uses data visualization to draw meaningful patterns and insights. It also involves the preparation of data sets for analysis by removing irregularities in the data.

Based on the results of EDA, companies also make business decisions, which can have repercussions later.

  • If EDA is not done properly then it can hamper the further steps in the machine learning model building process.
  • If done well, it may improve the efficacy of everything we do next.

In this article we’ll see about the following topics:

  1. Data Sourcing
  2. Data Cleaning
  3. Univariate analysis
  4. Bivariate analysis
  5. Multivariate analysis

1. Data Sourcing

Data Sourcing is the process of finding and loading the data into our system. Broadly there are two ways in which we can find data.

  1. Private Data
  2. Public Data

Private Data

As the name suggests, private data is given by private organizations. There are some security and privacy concerns attached to it. This type of data is used for mainly organizations internal analysis.

Public Data

This type of Data is available to everyone. We can find this in government websites and public organizations etc. Anyone can access this data, we do not need any special permissions or approval.

We can get public data on the following sites.

The very first step of EDA is Data Sourcing, we have seen how we can access data and load into our system. Now, the next step is how to clean the data.

2. Data Cleaning

After completing the Data Sourcing, the next step in the process of EDA is Data Cleaning. It is very important to get rid of the irregularities and clean the data after sourcing it into our system.

Irregularities are of different types of data.

  • Missing Values
  • Incorrect Format
  • Incorrect Headers
  • Anomalies/Outliers

To perform the data cleaning we are using a sample data set, which can be found here.

We are using Jupyter Notebook for analysis.

First, let’s import the necessary libraries and store the data in our system for analysis.

#import the useful libraries.
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
import seaborn as sns
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
%matplotlib inline

# Read the data set of "Marketing Analysis" in data.
data= pd.read_csv("marketing_analysis.csv")

# Printing the data
data

Now, the data set looks like this,

If we observe the above dataset, there are some discrepancies in the Column header for the first 2 rows. The correct data is from the index number 1. So, we have to fix the first two rows.

This is called Fixing the Rows and Columns. Let’s ignore the first two rows and load the data again.

#import the useful libraries.
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
import seaborn as sns
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
%matplotlib inline

# Read the file in data without first two rows as it is of no use.
data = pd.read_csv("marketing_analysis.csv",skiprows = 2)

#print the head of the data frame.
data.head()

Now, the dataset looks like this, and it makes more sense.

Dataset after fixing the rows and columns

Following are the steps to be taken while Fixing Rows and Columns:

  1. Delete Summary Rows and Columns in the Dataset.
  2. Delete Header and Footer Rows on every page.
  3. Delete Extra Rows like blank rows, page numbers, etc.
  4. We can merge different columns if it makes for better understanding of the data
  5. Similarly, we can also split one column into multiple columns based on our requirements or understanding.
  6. Add Column names, it is very important to have column names to the dataset.

Now if we observe the above dataset, the customerid column has of no importance to our analysis, and also the jobedu column has both the information of job and education in it.

So, what we’ll do is, we’ll drop the customerid column and we’ll split the jobedu column into two other columns job and education and after that, we’ll drop the jobedu column as well.

# Drop the customer id as it is of no use.
data.drop('customerid', axis = 1, inplace = True)

#Extract job  & Education in newly from "jobedu" column.
data['job']= data["jobedu"].apply(lambda x: x.split(",")[0])
data['education']= data["jobedu"].apply(lambda x: x.split(",")[1])

# Drop the "jobedu" column from the dataframe.
data.drop('jobedu', axis = 1, inplace = True)

# Printing the Dataset
data

Now, the dataset looks like this,

Dropping Customerid and jobedu columns and adding job and education columns

Missing Values

If there are missing values in the Dataset before doing any statistical analysis, we need to handle those missing values.

There are mainly three types of missing values.

  1. MCAR(Missing completely at random): These values do not depend on any other features.
  2. MAR(Missing at random): These values may be dependent on some other features.
  3. MNAR(Missing not at random): These missing values have some reason for why they are missing.

Let’s see which columns have missing values in the dataset.

# Checking the missing values
data.isnull().sum()

The output will be,

As we can see three columns contain missing values. Let’s see how to handle the missing values. We can handle missing values by dropping the missing records or by imputing the values.

Drop the missing Values

Let’s handle missing values in the age column.

# Dropping the records with age missing in data dataframe.
data = data[~data.age.isnull()].copy()

# Checking the missing values in the dataset.
data.isnull().sum()

Let’s check the missing values in the dataset now.

Let’s impute values to the missing values for the month column.

Since the month column is of an object type, let’s calculate the mode of that column and impute those values to the missing values.

# Find the mode of month in data
month_mode = data.month.mode()[0]

# Fill the missing values with mode value of month in data.
data.month.fillna(month_mode, inplace = True)

# Let's see the null values in the month column.
data.month.isnull().sum()

Now output is,

# Mode of month is
'may, 2017'
# Null values in month column after imputing with mode
0

Handling the missing values in the Response column. Since, our target column is Response Column, if we impute the values to this column it’ll affect our analysis. So, it is better to drop the missing values from Response Column.

#drop the records with response missing in data.
data = data[~data.response.isnull()].copy()
# Calculate the missing values in each column of data frame
data.isnull().sum()

Let’s check whether the missing values in the dataset have been handled or not,

All the missing values have been handled

We can also, fill the missing values as ‘NaN’ so that while doing any statistical analysis, it won’t affect the outcome.

Handling Outliers

We have seen how to fix missing values, now let’s see how to handle outliers in the dataset.

Outliers are the values that are far beyond the next nearest data points.

There are two types of outliers:

  1. Univariate outliers: Univariate outliers are the data points whose values lie beyond the range of expected values based on one variable.
  2. Multivariate outliers: While plotting data, some values of one variable may not lie beyond the expected range, but when you plot the data with some other variable, these values may lie far from the expected value.

So, after understanding the causes of these outliers, we can handle them by dropping those records or imputing with the values or leaving them as is, if it makes more sense.

Standardizing Values

To perform data analysis on a set of values, we have to make sure the values in the same column should be on the same scale. For example, if the data contains the values of the top speed of different companies’ cars, then the whole column should be either in meters/sec scale or miles/sec scale.

Now, that we are clear on how to source and clean the data, let’s see how we can analyze the data.

3. Univariate Analysis

If we analyze data over a single variable/column from a dataset, it is known as Univariate Analysis.

Categorical Unordered Univariate Analysis:

An unordered variable is a categorical variable that has no defined order. If we take our data as an example, the job column in the dataset is divided into many sub-categories like technician, blue-collar, services, management, etc. There is no weight or measure given to any value in the ‘job’ column.

Now, let’s analyze the job category by using plots. Since Job is a category, we will plot the bar plot.

# Let's calculate the percentage of each job status category.
data.job.value_counts(normalize=True)

#plot the bar graph of percentage job categories
data.job.value_counts(normalize=True).plot.barh()
plt.show()

The output looks like this,

By the above bar plot, we can infer that the data set contains more number of blue-collar workers compared to other categories.

Categorical Ordered Univariate Analysis:

Ordered variables are those variables that have a natural rank of order. Some examples of categorical ordered variables from our dataset are:

  • Month: Jan, Feb, March……
  • Education: Primary, Secondary,……

Now, let’s analyze the Education Variable from the dataset. Since we’ve already seen a bar plot, let’s see how a Pie Chart looks like.

#calculate the percentage of each education category.
data.education.value_counts(normalize=True)

#plot the pie chart of education categories
data.education.value_counts(normalize=True).plot.pie()
plt.show()

The output will be,

By the above analysis, we can infer that the data set has a large number of them belongs to secondary education after that tertiary and next primary. Also, a very small percentage of them have been unknown.

This is how we analyze univariate categorical analysis. If the column or variable is of numerical then we’ll analyze by calculating its mean, median, std, etc. We can get those values by using the describe function.

data.salary.describe()

The output will be,

4. Bivariate Analysis

If we analyze data by taking two variables/columns into consideration from a dataset, it is known as Bivariate Analysis.

a) Numeric-Numeric Analysis:

Analyzing the two numeric variables from a dataset is known as numeric-numeric analysis. We can analyze it in three different ways.

  • Scatter Plot
  • Pair Plot
  • Correlation Matrix

Scatter Plot

Let’s take three columns ‘Balance’, ‘Age’ and ‘Salary’ from our dataset and see what we can infer by plotting to scatter plot between salary balance and age balance

#plot the scatter plot of balance and salary variable in data
plt.scatter(data.salary,data.balance)
plt.show()

#plot the scatter plot of balance and age variable in data
data.plot.scatter(x="age",y="balance")
plt.show()

Now, the scatter plots looks like,

Pair Plot

Now, let’s plot Pair Plots for the three columns we used in plotting Scatter plots. We’ll use the seaborn library for plotting Pair Plots.

#plot the pair plot of salary, balance and age in data dataframe.
sns.pairplot(data = data, vars=['salary','balance','age'])
plt.show()

The Pair Plot looks like this,

Correlation Matrix

Since we cannot use more than two variables as x-axis and y-axis in Scatter and Pair Plots, it is difficult to see the relation between three numerical variables in a single graph. In those cases, we’ll use the correlation matrix.

# Creating a matrix using age, salry, balance as rows and columns
data[['age','salary','balance']].corr()

#plot the correlation matrix of salary, balance and age in data dataframe.
sns.heatmap(data[['age','salary','balance']].corr(), annot=True, cmap = 'Reds')
plt.show()

First, we created a matrix using age, salary, and balance. After that, we are plotting the heatmap using the seaborn library of the matrix.

b) Numeric - Categorical Analysis

Analyzing the one numeric variable and one categorical variable from a dataset is known as numeric-categorical analysis. We analyze them mainly using mean, median, and box plots.

Let’s take salary and response columns from our dataset.

First check for mean value using groupby

#groupby the response to find the mean of the salary with response no & yes separately.
data.groupby('response')['salary'].mean()

The output will be,

There is not much of a difference between the yes and no response based on the salary.

Let’s calculate the median,

#groupby the response to find the median of the salary with response no & yes separately.
data.groupby('response')['salary'].median()

The output will be,

By both mean and median we can say that the response of yes and no remains the same irrespective of the person’s salary. But, is it truly behaving like that, let’s plot the box plot for them and check the behavior.

#plot the box plot of salary for yes & no responses.
sns.boxplot(data.response, data.salary)
plt.show()

The box plot looks like this,

As we can see, when we plot the Box Plot, it paints a very different picture compared to mean and median. The IQR for customers who gave a positive response is on the higher salary side.

This is how we analyze Numeric-Categorical variables, we use mean, median, and Box Plots to draw some sort of conclusions.

c) Categorical — Categorical Analysis

Since our target variable/column is the Response rate, we’ll see how the different categories like Education, Marital Status, etc., are associated with the Response column. So instead of ‘Yes’ and ‘No’ we will convert them into ‘1’ and ‘0’, by doing that we’ll get the “Response Rate”.

#create response_rate of numerical data type where response "yes"= 1, "no"= 0
data['response_rate'] = np.where(data.response=='yes',1,0)
data.response_rate.value_counts()

The output looks like this,

Let’s see how the response rate varies for different categories in marital status.

#plot the bar graph of marital status with average value of response_rate
data.groupby('marital')['response_rate'].mean().plot.bar()
plt.show()

The graph looks like this,

By the above graph, we can infer that the positive response is more for Single status members in the data set. Similarly, we can plot the graphs for Loan vs Response rate, Housing Loans vs Response rate, etc.

5. Multivariate Analysis

If we analyze data by taking more than two variables/columns into consideration from a dataset, it is known as Multivariate Analysis.

Let’s see how ‘Education’, ‘Marital’, and ‘Response_rate’ vary with each other.

First, we’ll create a pivot table with the three columns and after that, we’ll create a heatmap.

result = pd.pivot_table(data=data, index='education', columns='marital',values='response_rate')
print(result)

#create heat map of education vs marital vs response_rate
sns.heatmap(result, annot=True, cmap = 'RdYlGn', center=0.117)
plt.show()

The Pivot table and heatmap looks like this,

Based on the Heatmap we can infer that the married people with primary education are less likely to respond positively for the survey and single people with tertiary education are most likely to respond positively to the survey.

Similarly, we can plot the graphs for Job vs marital vs response, Education vs poutcome vs response, etc.

Conclusion

This is how we’ll do Exploratory Data Analysis. Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) helps us to look beyond the data. The more we explore the data, the more the insights we draw from it. As a data analyst, almost 80% of our time will be spent understanding data and solving various business problems through EDA.

Thank you for reading and Happy Coding!!!

#dataanalysis #python

Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1619510796

Lambda, Map, Filter functions in python

Welcome to my Blog, In this article, we will learn python lambda function, Map function, and filter function.

Lambda function in python: Lambda is a one line anonymous function and lambda takes any number of arguments but can only have one expression and python lambda syntax is

Syntax: x = lambda arguments : expression

Now i will show you some python lambda function examples:

#python #anonymous function python #filter function in python #lambda #lambda python 3 #map python #python filter #python filter lambda #python lambda #python lambda examples #python map

Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1619518440

top 30 Python Tips and Tricks for Beginners

Welcome to my Blog , In this article, you are going to learn the top 10 python tips and tricks.

1) swap two numbers.

2) Reversing a string in Python.

3) Create a single string from all the elements in list.

4) Chaining Of Comparison Operators.

5) Print The File Path Of Imported Modules.

6) Return Multiple Values From Functions.

7) Find The Most Frequent Value In A List.

8) Check The Memory Usage Of An Object.

#python #python hacks tricks #python learning tips #python programming tricks #python tips #python tips and tricks #python tips and tricks advanced #python tips and tricks for beginners #python tips tricks and techniques #python tutorial #tips and tricks in python #tips to learn python #top 30 python tips and tricks for beginners

Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1619571780

Top 20 Most Useful Python Modules or Packages

 March 25, 2021  Deepak@321  0 Comments

Welcome to my blog, In this article, we will learn the top 20 most useful python modules or packages and these modules every Python developer should know.

Hello everybody and welcome back so in this article I’m going to be sharing with you 20 Python modules you need to know. Now I’ve split these python modules into four different categories to make little bit easier for us and the categories are:

  1. Web Development
  2. Data Science
  3. Machine Learning
  4. AI and graphical user interfaces.

Near the end of the article, I also share my personal favorite Python module so make sure you stay tuned to see what that is also make sure to share with me in the comments down below your favorite Python module.

#python #packages or libraries #python 20 modules #python 20 most usefull modules #python intersting modules #top 20 python libraries #top 20 python modules #top 20 python packages

Shardul Bhatt

Shardul Bhatt

1626775355

Why use Python for Software Development

No programming language is pretty much as diverse as Python. It enables building cutting edge applications effortlessly. Developers are as yet investigating the full capability of end-to-end Python development services in various areas. 

By areas, we mean FinTech, HealthTech, InsureTech, Cybersecurity, and that's just the beginning. These are New Economy areas, and Python has the ability to serve every one of them. The vast majority of them require massive computational abilities. Python's code is dynamic and powerful - equipped for taking care of the heavy traffic and substantial algorithmic capacities. 

Programming advancement is multidimensional today. Endeavor programming requires an intelligent application with AI and ML capacities. Shopper based applications require information examination to convey a superior client experience. Netflix, Trello, and Amazon are genuine instances of such applications. Python assists with building them effortlessly. 

5 Reasons to Utilize Python for Programming Web Apps 

Python can do such numerous things that developers can't discover enough reasons to admire it. Python application development isn't restricted to web and enterprise applications. It is exceptionally adaptable and superb for a wide range of uses.

Robust frameworks 

Python is known for its tools and frameworks. There's a structure for everything. Django is helpful for building web applications, venture applications, logical applications, and mathematical processing. Flask is another web improvement framework with no conditions. 

Web2Py, CherryPy, and Falcon offer incredible capabilities to customize Python development services. A large portion of them are open-source frameworks that allow quick turn of events. 

Simple to read and compose 

Python has an improved sentence structure - one that is like the English language. New engineers for Python can undoubtedly understand where they stand in the development process. The simplicity of composing allows quick application building. 

The motivation behind building Python, as said by its maker Guido Van Rossum, was to empower even beginner engineers to comprehend the programming language. The simple coding likewise permits developers to roll out speedy improvements without getting confused by pointless subtleties. 

Utilized by the best 

Alright - Python isn't simply one more programming language. It should have something, which is the reason the business giants use it. Furthermore, that too for different purposes. Developers at Google use Python to assemble framework organization systems, parallel information pusher, code audit, testing and QA, and substantially more. Netflix utilizes Python web development services for its recommendation algorithm and media player. 

Massive community support 

Python has a steadily developing community that offers enormous help. From amateurs to specialists, there's everybody. There are a lot of instructional exercises, documentation, and guides accessible for Python web development solutions. 

Today, numerous universities start with Python, adding to the quantity of individuals in the community. Frequently, Python designers team up on various tasks and help each other with algorithmic, utilitarian, and application critical thinking. 

Progressive applications 

Python is the greatest supporter of data science, Machine Learning, and Artificial Intelligence at any enterprise software development company. Its utilization cases in cutting edge applications are the most compelling motivation for its prosperity. Python is the second most well known tool after R for data analytics.

The simplicity of getting sorted out, overseeing, and visualizing information through unique libraries makes it ideal for data based applications. TensorFlow for neural networks and OpenCV for computer vision are two of Python's most well known use cases for Machine learning applications.

Summary

Thinking about the advances in programming and innovation, Python is a YES for an assorted scope of utilizations. Game development, web application development services, GUI advancement, ML and AI improvement, Enterprise and customer applications - every one of them uses Python to its full potential. 

The disadvantages of Python web improvement arrangements are regularly disregarded by developers and organizations because of the advantages it gives. They focus on quality over speed and performance over blunders. That is the reason it's a good idea to utilize Python for building the applications of the future.

#python development services #python development company #python app development #python development #python in web development #python software development