Keith  Evans

Keith Evans

1674516720

React Mix: Start using React with Project Brownie

Brownie React Mix

This mix comes with everything you need to start using React with a Brownie project.

Installation

Install Brownie, if you haven't already. You must be using version 1.9.0 or newer.

Download the mix.

brownie bake react-mix

Install the React client dependencies.

cd ./client
yarn install

or

cd ./client
npm install 

If you want to be able to deploy to testnets, do the following.

Set your WEB3_INFURA_PROJECT_ID, and PRIVATE_KEY environment variables.

You can get a WEB3_INFURA_PROJECT_ID by getting a free trial of Infura. At the moment, it does need to be infura with brownie. If you get lost, follow the instructions at https://ethereumico.io/knowledge-base/infura-api-key-guide/. You can find your PRIVATE_KEY from your ethereum wallet like metamask.

You'll also need testnet ETH. You can get ETH into your wallet by using the faucet for the appropriate testnet. For Kovan, a faucet is available at https://linkfaucet.protofire.io/kovan.

You can add your environment variables to a .env file. You can use the .env_example in this repo as a template, just fill in the values and rename it to '.env'.

Here is what your .env should look like:

export WEB3_INFURA_PROJECT_ID=<PROJECT_ID>
export PRIVATE_KEY=<PRIVATE_KEY>

Create brownie account(s) following instructions here: https://eth-brownie.readthedocs.io/en/stable/account-management.html

Import the brownie account to MetaMask using their private key(s)

Usage

Open the Brownie console. Starting the console launches a fresh Ganache instance in the background.

$ brownie console
Brownie v1.9.0 - Python development framework for Ethereum

ReactMixProject is the active project.
Launching 'ganache-cli'...
Brownie environment is ready.

Alternatively, to run on Kovan, set the network flag to kovan

$ brownie console --network kovan
Brownie v1.14.6 - Python development framework for Ethereum

ReactMixProject is the active project.
Brownie environment is ready.

Run the deployment script to deploy the project's smart contracts.

>>> run("deploy")
Running 'scripts.deploy.main'...
Transaction sent: 0xd1000d04fe99a07db864bcd1095ddf5cb279b43be8e159f94dbff9d4e4809c70
Gas price: 0.0 gwei   Gas limit: 6721975
SolidityStorage.constructor confirmed - Block: 1   Gas used: 110641 (1.65%)
SolidityStorage deployed at: 0xF104A50668c3b1026E8f9B0d9D404faF8E42e642

Transaction sent: 0xee112392522ed24ac6ab8cc8ba09bfe51c5d699d9d1b39294ba87e5d2a56212c
Gas price: 0.0 gwei   Gas limit: 6721975
VyperStorage.constructor confirmed - Block: 2   Gas used: 134750 (2.00%)
VyperStorage deployed at: 0xB8485421abC325D172652123dBd71D58b8117070

While Brownie is still running, start the React app in a different terminal.

The first time this app is used, the node modules have to be installed in /src. To do this, navigate to ./client/src and run

# make sure to use a different terminal, not the brownie console
npm install
npm audit fix

Connect Metamask to the local Ganache network. In the upper right corner, click the network dropdown menu. Select Localhost 8545, or Kovan test network:

Interact with the smart contracts using the web interface or via the Brownie console.

# get the newest vyper storage contract
>>> vyper_storage = VyperStorage[-1]

# the default sender of the transaction is the contract creator
>>> vyper_storage.set(1337)

Any changes to the contracts from the console should show on the website after a refresh, and vice versa.

Ending a Session

When you close the Brownie console, the Ganache instance also terminates and the deployment artifacts are deleted.

To retain your deployment artifacts (and their functionality) you can launch Ganache yourself prior to launching Brownie. Brownie automatically attaches to the ganache instance where you can deploy the contracts. After closing Brownie, the chain and deployment artifacts will persist.

Further Possibilities

Testing

To run the test suite:

brownie test

Deploying to a Live Network

To deploy your contracts to the mainnet or one of the test nets, first modify scripts/deploy.py to use a funded account.

Then:

brownie run deploy --network kovan

Replace kovan with the name of the network you wish you use. You may also wish to adjust Brownie's network settings.

For contracts deployed on a live network, the deployment information is stored permanently unless you:

  • Delete or rename the contract file or
  • Manually remove the client/src/artifacts/ directory

Resources

This mix provides a bare-bones implementation of Create React App, configured to work with Brownie.

To get started with React and building a front-end for your dApps:

  • Rimble is an open-source library of React components and guides to help you make dApps. Along with components they provide guides and tutorials to help you get started.
  • For more in-depth information, read the Create React App documentation

To get started with Brownie:

Any questions? Join our Gitter channel to chat and share with others in the community.


Download details:

Author: brownie-mix
Source code: https://github.com/brownie-mix/react-mix

#web3 #React #blockchain

React Mix: Start using React with Project Brownie
Keith  Evans

Keith Evans

1674420420

How to Build Youtube using React and Solidty on Polygon Blockchain

OurTube — It is YouTube but decentralized

About The Project

Ourtube

OurTube is a YouTube Clone built on top of Polygon network and The Graph, that allows users to create, share and watch videos, without worrying about their privacy.

Here is a complete tutorial on how to build a similar project: https://blog.suhailkakar.com/building-a-full-stack-web3-youtube-clone-with-next-ipfs-the-graph-solidity-and-livepeer

This is the version 2.0 of this applications, you can find the first verion here

Built With

  • Frontend framework: Next.js
  • Smart contracts: Solidity
  • Ethereum web client library: Ethers.js
  • File storage: IPFS
  • Querying data: The Graph
  • CSS Framework: TailwindCSS
  • Ethereum development environment: Hardhat
  • Layer 2 blockchain: Polygon
  • Video Infrastructure: Livepeer

Getting Started

To get this application up and and running on your local machine follow these simple steps.

Prerequisites

You need to have Node.js, NPM and hardhat installed on your computer, before running this project.

Installation

Clone the repo

git clone https://github.com/suhailkakar/Decentralized-YouTube

Install NPM packages

or

yarn install
npm install

Create an .env file and get an API key from Livepeer studio, Web3 Storage and Imagekit.

PRIVATE_KEY=""
NEXT_PUBLIC_LIVEPEER_KEY=""
NEXT_PUBLIC_WEB3_STORAGE_KEY=
NEXT_PUBLIC_IMAGEKIT_ID=""

Compile the smart contract

npx hardhat compile

Deploy the smart contract

Get your contract address and paste in on constants/index.ts

Deploy subgraph in indexer directory by following steps in indexer/README.md (optional, since it is already deployed in hosted service)

Get subgraph query endpoint after deployment and update it in constants/index.t

Run the app

npm start

Contributing

Contributions are what make the open source community such an amazing place to learn, inspire, and create. Any contributions you make are greatly appreciated.

If you have a suggestion that would make this better, please fork the repo and create a pull request. You can also simply open an issue. Don't forget to give the project a star! Thanks again!

  1. Fork the Project
  2. Create your Feature Branch (git checkout -b feature/AmazingFeature)
  3. Commit your Changes (git commit -m 'Add some AmazingFeature')
  4. Push to the Branch (git push origin feature/AmazingFeature)
  5. Open a Pull Request

Download details:

Author: suhailkakar
Source code: https://github.com/suhailkakar/Decentralized-YouTube

#web3 #React  #Solidty  #Polygon  

How to Build Youtube using React and Solidty on Polygon Blockchain
harvey h

harvey h

1673876530

Best Headless CMS For React

#React is a 'frontend' framework; it can only handle the visual aspects of your #webapp. React does not have a default #CMS system like #WordPress, #Wix, and other platforms. 😶

For React to work, you need a CMS that can handle #backend and #database operations, such as storing & sending data to the frontend when requested.

We need a #headlesscms for #ReactJS to accomplish this. Headless CMS divides your project into head and body. Click 👇🏻 to get more info.....
 

https://aglowiditsolutions.com/blog/best-headless-cms-react/

Best Headless CMS For React
Ruth  Clarke

Ruth Clarke

1673760660

A Collection Of Cool UI Components Made with React and Typescript

🚀 LUKY-UI-React

Welcome to Luky-components!

Here you can find a bunch of cool UI component created with React + Typescript and Tailwind/Windicss. Be free to use-it as you wish 😊 And if you like it, give Star ⭐ so I can know that you like it!

💪 Contribute to the project

If you want to contribute to this project, just fork it, create new branch and add all your changes and then send a pull request. 😊

🔥 Previews

Luky Navbar

🔥 Components List

Some of this component where inspared by the work of some cool designers, so we credit them for the references.

List componentstateAuthorReference credit
LukyAnimatedNavbarluk3dHappy Tri Milliarta
LukySimpleNavbarluk3dConceptzilla for Shakuro

.gitignore

# Logslogs*.lognpm-debug.log*yarn-debug.log*yarn-error.log*pnpm-debug.log*lerna-debug.log*node_modulesdistdist-ssr*.local# Editor directories and files.vscode/*!.vscode/extensions.json.idea.DS_Store*.suo*.ntvs**.njsproj*.sln*.sw?

Download details:

Author: LUK3D
Source code: https://github.com/LUK3D/lukyUi

#React #typescript 

A Collection Of Cool UI Components Made with React and Typescript
Jane  Reid

Jane Reid

1673757060

Timer App: A Clone Of Windows 11 Timer App Built with React

Windows Timer App

A full clone of the timer feature found within the Windows Clock app

Live Site

http://windows-timer-app.surge.sh/

Run Locally

Clone the project

  git clone https://github.com/mfahad24/timer-app.git

Go to the project directory

  cd timer-app

Install dependencies

  npm install

Start the app

  npm run start

Running Tests

To run tests, run the following command

  npm run test

Tech Stack

Client: React, React Hooks, TypeScript Axios, Modular CSS, Material UI

Server: Node, Express

Database: MySQL

Features

The user is able to:

  • Create a timer with specifications
  • Delete a timer
  • Maximize/minimize single timer card

Screenshots

Timer App All Card View

Single Timer Max View

Mobile View

.gitignore

# See https://help.github.com/articles/ignoring-files/ for more about ignoring files.

# dependencies
/node_modules
/.pnp
.pnp.js

# testing
/coverage

# production
/build

# misc
.DS_Store
.env.local
.env.development.local
.env.test.local
.env.production.local

npm-debug.log*
yarn-debug.log*
yarn-error.log*

Download details:

Author: mfahad24
Source code: https://github.com/mfahad24/timer-app

#React #react-native 

Timer App: A Clone Of Windows 11 Timer App Built with React

Web3 Starknet React: A Starknet React Provider and Connectors inspired

web3-starknet-react 🚀

A simple, maximally extensible, dependency minimized framework for building Starknet dApps

Provides easy access to Starknet Interface all over the React App. Inspired from web3-react

Packages@latest versionSizeDescription
🏝 Core   
@web3-starknet-react/corenpm versionminzipReact hooks and context for accessing Starknet
🔌 Connectors   
Browser Extension/dApp Browser   
@web3-starknet-react/braavos-connectornpm versionminzipBraavos Wallet connector
@web3-starknet-react/argentx-connectornpm versionminzipArgentX Wallet connector
🔫 Low Level   
@web3-starknet-react/abstract-connectornpm versionminzipLow Level implementation of connector
@web3-starknet-react/typesnpm versionminzipShared TypeScript Types


 

⭐️ Documentation

Projects using web3-starknet-react

Open a PR to add your starknet project to the list

Local Development

Clone repo 
git clone https://github.com/dhruvkelawala/web3-starknet-react

Install top-level dependencies 
yarn

Install sub-dependencies 
yarn bootstrap

Build and watch for changes 
yarn start


Download details:

Author: dhruvkelawala
Source code: https://github.com/dhruvkelawala/web3-starknet-react

License: MIT license

#React #web3 #blockchain 

Web3 Starknet React: A Starknet React Provider and Connectors inspired

5 Lessons Learned When Building React Applications

In this React article, we will learn about 6 lessons learned when building React applications. I recently gave a talk on “Lessons I Learned building React Applications”, at a conference. I thought this is a good talk that needs to be documented as a blog post. So here we are.

Lesson 1: Use Functional Components

Class components in React, are a story of the past. Class components are confusing to people and machines. Here are my top reasons on why you should start using functional components for your React applications.

Why Functional Components?

  • Simpler to learn and write.
  • Less code.
  • Easier to maintain and test.
  • Availability of hooks within functional components.

Hook is a special function that let’s you hook into React features, within functional components.

So if you are starting out and learning React, you don’t have to worry about class components. You can directly learn functional components. If you already have a React app, just ensure going forward you write your new components as functional components.

Note: Keep in mind that React still supports class components, so you don’t have to rewrite your class components into functional components.

import React, { useState } from "react";

const YesNoButtonComponent = () => {
  const [button, setButton] = useState("");

  const onButtonPress = (buttonName) => {
    setButton(buttonName);
    console.log(buttonName);
  };

  return (
    <div>
      <button onClick={() => onButtonPress("Yes")}>Yes</button>
      <button onClick={() => onButtonPress("No")}>No</button>
     </div>
  );
};

In the example above you can see a React functional component in action, utilizing the useState hook!

Functional components are the future of React!

Lesson 2: Break down components – when needed!

Component

Each component is a building block that is a reusable piece of UI. Putting them all together results in a complete application.

Here is a simple strategy I follow, when I need to break down components within an application.

When do I break down components?

  • Managing state is becoming a nightmare!
  • Performance concerns with re-rendering of the component or application.
  • Code readability takes a hit.
  • Working with multiple developers on the codebase becomes challenging.
  • Testing the component is harder.

If you encounter any of these problems listed above, it is a good idea to start breaking down the component into smaller components. There is no hard and fast rule on how large or small your React component needs to be. If you notice any of the problems above, it is a warning sign that the component needs to be smaller.

Lesson 3: TypeScript is a life saver!

In the last year or so I have switched my projects to TypeScript. I didn’t realize then, on how much better my developer experience was going to be with this switch.

Here are some top reasons why I think TypeScript is a life saver:

  • Catch problems early on at compile time.
  • Intellisense is accurate.
  • Easier to refactor code.
  • Readable code.
  • Easier to maintain and test.
  • High quality documentation with TSDoc.
type HeadingProps = {
  title: string;
  bold: boolean;
}

export const Heading = ({ title, bold }: HeadingProps) => {
  return (
    <div>
      {bold ? "Bold Title: " : "Regular Title: "}
      {title}
    </div>
  );
};

In the example above, you can see TypeScript in action. The component Heading accept the props title and bold of type HeadingProps. Anytime we invoke the Heading component we will have to pass to it, all the props with the appropriate types. Your IDE will throw an error, if you either miss a prop or pass a prop of incorrect type as shown below.

This is quite awesome while developing React components, to get instant feedback while coding.

Lesson 4: Start with local state!

local

A lot of the times, when React projects are started, developers immediately think that they somehow need an external state management library. It is not uncommon to see teams setup Redux/MobX/XState or similar libraries when they get started with building a React application.

I would recommend to start with local state for your React application, and make state management decisions as your application grows. Often times, your application may really not need complex solutions for state management. So why bring all the added bulk of libraries, if you can do away with them?

Here is a workflow you can follow while your application grows:

1. Start with local state first: When you start building your application, keep state local to each component. And this may suffice most of the times, and you can use the useState hook to manage the state.

2. Pass down state via props: If a child component needs access to the state from a parent, it can then be passed via props from the parent to child component.

3. Lift state up: There can be situations where a non-child component needs access to data from another component. In this scenario, you can use the concept of lifting state up to the common parent component.

4. Use context: Context is designed to share data that is global for a tree of React components. If you want to avoid passing certain props through multiple layers of components, then use context. Context is usually used for data such as demographic information, theme, etc.. that are needed by most of the components.

5. If all of the above is not enough, then go for external state management: If you have tried all of the above methods, and your application’s state is still growing, and you think it could benefit from using an external state management solution; then go for it. There are plenty of options such as Redux, MobX, XState and so on, that you can bring into your application

Lesson 5: Test, Test and Test!

Last but not the least  – Test your code! Once you follow all the other best practices in React, your code should be easy to test. There are different types of testing that you can do with your React application, and I recommend all of them.

Unit Tests

Jest is the most popular testing framework for unit tests. There are other frameworks as well like Mocha that you can use. Unit testing is the most basic form of testing, that lets you test the smallest units in your code.

Component Tests

Everything in React is a component and it follows the component based approach. Your components are individual reusable units that can be tested efficiently. This form of testing is very crucial in React.

Kent C.Dodd’s React Testing Library is a lightweight solution to testing React components. It provides simple React DOM testing utilities that encourage best practices with testing. Many teams have had good success in testing their components with this library. Do check it out, if you haven’t.

Automated End to End Tests

This type of testing is basically testing the application as a whole. It simulates how a user will click through the application and test it in a browser. The most popular and easy to use framework for end to end testing JavaScript (or anything that runs on a browser) is Cypress. I have used Cypress to test front end applications, and it is a total breeze to setup and get running. This will entail testing in a realistic browser environment and I highly recommend including these tests to your React app.


Conclusion

Well that’s a wrap! I hope you enjoyed reading this article on lessons I have learned working with React over the years. There is no set rule while developing React applications. React itself is a flexible library, giving developers the freedom to make decisions. With freedom comes responsibility, which is what makes React interesting to me.


Original article sourced at: https://programmingwithmosh.com

#React 

5 Lessons Learned When Building React Applications

What Is a Component Component in React and How to Use It

In this React article, we will learn what is a Component in React and how to use it. Component composition is a powerful pattern to make your components more reusable.

If you are already familiar with React, you're probably already using it (maybe without knowing its name).


What is component composition in React?

In React, we can make components more generic by accepting props, which are to React components what parameters are to functions.

Component composition is the name for passing components as props to other components, thus creating new components with other components.

const Button = ({ onClick, children }) => (
 <button onClick={onClick}>{children}</button>
);

const App = () => {
  const onClick = () => alert('Hey 👋');

  return (
    <Button onClick={onClick}>Click me!</Button>
  );
};

children is nothing more than a prop to the Button component.

Instead of passing down a string to Button, we may want to add an icon to the text as well:

const App = () => {
  const onClick = () => alert('Hey 👋');

  return (
    <Button onClick={onClick}>
      <img src="/logos/logo.svg" />      Click me!
    </Button>
  );
};

But we're not limited to the children prop. We can create more specific props that can accept components as well:

const Button = ({ onClick, icon, children }) => (
 <button onClick={onClick}>{icon}{children}</button>
);

const App = () => {
  const onClick = () => alert('Hey 👋');

  return (
    <Button
      onClick={onClick}
      icon={<img src="/logos/logo.svg" />}    >
      Click me!
    </Button>
  );
};

And that is the essence of component composition: a simple yet incredibly powerful pattern that makes React components highly reusable.

When working on React projects, you'll continuously find yourself refactoring components to be more generic through component composition so that you can use them in multiple places.

How can composition help prop drilling?

Prop drilling is the act of passing props through multiple layers of components.

Here's an example where we are passing userName through multiple layers:

const App = () => {
  const userName = 'Joe';

  return (
    <WelcomePage userName={userName} />
  );
}

const WelcomePage = ({ userName }) => {
  return (
    <>
      <WelcomeMessage userName={userName} />
      {/** Some other welcome page code */}
    </>
  );
}

const WelcomeMessage = ({ userName }) => {
  return (
    <h1>Hey, {userName}!</h1>
  );
}

Here's a visualization of how the components are structured:

Prop drilling example
 

App passes userName to WelcomePage, and WelcomePage passes userName to WelcomeMessage.

With only a few layers, this isn't a big deal, but this can quickly get out of hand in larger applications.

The easiest solution? Component composition!

Instead of passing userName through all these layers, we can try to compose the components at a higher level, like the App component.

const App = () => {
  const userName = 'Joe';

  return (
    <WelcomePage title={<WelcomeMessage userName={userName} />} />
  );
}

const WelcomePage = ({ title }) => {
  return (
    <>
      {title}
      {/** Some other welcome page code */}
    </>
  );
}

const WelcomeMessage = ({ userName }) => {
  return (
    <h1>Hey, {userName}!</h1>
  );
}

We can now see that only App imports all the components. We successfully removed one layer and avoided prop drilling.

Prop drilling solution
 

Our app, after removing one layer with component composition. We don't need to pass down userName twice anymore—we just pass it to WelcomeMessage right away.

Now, I don't say that either of these examples is bad code and that prop drilling should be avoided at all costs.

However, it's a useful pattern to be aware of if prop-drilling becomes an issue.

How can composition help performance?

Composition is also a great ally if you try to reduce the number of re-renders in your application.

Let's say you have a Post component that displays the scroll progress. It updates the state base on the scroll event:

const Post = () => {
  const [progress, setProgress] = React.useState(0);
  React.useEffect(() => {
    const scrollListener = () => {
      // update the progress based on the scroll position
    }

    window.addEventListener('scroll', scrollListener, false);
  }, [])

  return (
    <>
      <h2 className="progress">
        Progress: {progress}%
      </h2>
      <div className="content">
        <h1>Content Title</h1>
        {/** more content */}
      </div>
    </>
  )
}

Here's the link to the Codepen if you want to see the details.

This code will cause a lot of re-renders, and we can assume that the blog post content contains a lot more components—so re-renders will be expensive.

If we move the logic to a separate component and use component composition to glue them together, the number of re-renders goes from 61 (on my computer) to 1 for the content section of the Post component.

All I did was moving the state updates to PostLayout and rendering the post content as a prop.

const PostLayout = ({ children }) => {
  const [progress, setProgress] = React.useState(0);
  React.useEffect(() => {
    const scrollListener = () => {
      // update the progress based on the scroll position
    }

    window.addEventListener('scroll', scrollListener, false);
  }, []);

  return (
    <>
      <h2 className="progress">
        Progress: {progress}%
      </h2>
      {children}
    </>
  );
};

const Post = () => {
  return (
    <PostLayout>
      <div className="content">
        <h1>Content Title</h1>
        {/** more content */}
      </div>
    </PostLayout>
  );
};

Here's the link to the Codepen for the optimized version.

Why is it that the content only renders once in this case?

The reason is that React renders props only if they change.

As a refresher on re-renders: React components re-render when their state or props change.

Here can read more about how React re-renders components in detail.

So looking at PostLayout again, children doesn't re-render because it's a prop that hasn't changed.

<>  <h2 className="progress">    Progress: {progress}%  </h2>  {children}
</>

Only the highlighted sections re-render.

Conclusion

As you can see, re-organizing your components can be incredibly powerful to make your code more organized, avoid prop drilling, and even improve performance.


Original article sourced at: https://felixgerschau.com/

#react-native #React 

What Is a Component Component in React and How to Use It
harvey h

harvey h

1669291586

Redux vs React Hooks

#frontenddevelopers face a number of challenges when managing states in their #ReactApplications.🤔

The complexity of large commercial #webapps may make #ReactJS alone insufficient. The challenge can be addressed using #reacthooks or libraries like #Redux that manage application state.😍

Checkout how to use Redux and #React Hooks for #react-native 

https://aglowiditsolutions.com/blog/react-hooks-vs-redux/

Redux vs React Hooks

shalu vashisht

1669021236

Best Animation Libraries for React

 

#Hire react js developer   #React js       #React 

A JavaScript library called React is useful for designing elegant user interfaces. 

While some programmers refer to it as React js, others are more familiar with the name React. 

React.js is a  library,  that is designed with JavaScript code.

User experience is one of the major concerns in modern applications. 

Designers add many effects to web applications’ UI designs to appeal to more audiences. 

As developers, we must be proficient enough to deliver the product as they expect.

But sometimes, skill is not just the only thing developers require. They should also be aware of the tools and libraries at our disposal. 

Here we highlighted five libraries. Hire react js developer for adding animations to your React project.

1. Remotion

Firstly, Remotion is an exciting library introduced at the beginning of 2021, 

Secondly,  you can design both animations and videos with it. 

Thirdly, allows you to design animations using common web technologies like HTML, CSS, JavaScript, TypeScript, etc.

Fourthly, requires no additional knowledge about video editing.

Fifthly, It also includes React features such as reusable components, powerful compositions, and quick reload.

Lastly, Remotion Player offers you the feeling of a real video editor.

Additionally, it is useful to play and review your video using your browser.

2. Framer Motion

 Firstly, it is another emerging React animation library you should be aware of. 

Secondly, this React js library is a combination of two APIs (the Framer API and Motion API).

Thirdly, offers rapid interactivity and prototyping capabilities for web and mobile applications.

Fourthly, the Motion library enables animations and gestures.

Fifthly, Supplies advanced physics-based animation.

Sixthly, it generates animations automatically, 

In addition, you just need to configure the right settings values.

Some additional benefits:

  • Helps gesture recognizers like hover, tap, pan, and drag.
  •  Helps server-side rendering.
  •  Effortless changes and manipulates colours.
  •  Good documentation is simple to learn.
  • Enables TypeScript.

3. React Motion 

Firstly, it is another emerging library that enables you to design realistic animations. 

Secondly, provides five different components: spring, Motion, StaggeredMotion, TransitionMotion, and presets. All of them have a unique purpose:

Thirdly, includes well-documented examples of their features.

4. React-spring

Firstly, it is a spring-physics-based animation library. 

Secondly, It enfolds most of our UI-related modern animation needs with comfort.

Thirdly, it is highly flexible and inherits some properties of React Motion.

Fourthly, offers Hooks to manage several scenarios such as useChain, useSpring, useSprings, useTrail, use transition).

Fifthly, offers a way to apply animations without relying on React to render updates.

Other Additional Benefits:

  • The testing process is supported with Jest.
  • Provides easy and simple documentation.
  • Offers outstanding support for both web and React-native applications.

 

5.React Move 

Firstly, React move is a simple library that is useful for designing data-driven animations using React. 

Secondly, use to execute various animations and transitions. 

In addition, It features an outstanding Custom tweeting ability.

Thirdly, supports React, React Native and React-VR.

Other Additional benefits

  • It includes a satisfactory-grained control of delay, duration, and easing.
  • Enables animation lifecycle events.
  • Supports TypeScript.
  • Easier than React Motion.

 

6.React Ticker

Firstly, it is a small, adequate React js component that endlessly scrolls between text, photos, and videos like a newsticker. 

Additionally, Other than React 16+, React Ticker has no dependencies. Therefore, React Ticker will be supported by all modern browsers, including Internet Explorer 11.

Secondly, it moves the child components to the left or the right.

Thirdly, Dynamically generating child elements, such as via an API. 

Fourthly, helps to Repeat the components endlessly

Fifthly, it possesses three different repeating modes: Regulating your pace, beginning, and stopping.

Lastly, Specify the start offset.

7. React Anime 

Firstly, React anime is an amiable library for React animation. 

Secondly, By employing the delay prop, animations can be cascaded. 

Thirdly, Animating CSS, SVG, and DOM qualities are uncomplicated when you use props with their corresponding names.

8.React Reveal 

Firstly, is a React-specific animation library that has a limited file size and an MIT license. 

Secondly, useful for designing animations, such as the scroll reveal animation.

Additionally,  As the user scrolls, you can also emphasise key phrases in your message.

Thirdly, it provides a prompt and simple method to add excitement to your message.

Fourthly, It suggests outstanding assistance for collapsing parts. 

Therefore, Pop-up windows, which are generally loathed, are no longer necessary.

9. React Transition Group

 Firstly, it is a development tool that reduces the boilerplate code. 

Secondly, provides simple and direct components for defining animations, better than many other React animation libraries.

Thirdly, Instead of directly defining styles, the library makes it much easier to implement transitions and animations by manipulating the DOM.

Fourthly, offers an easier method for animations and transitions.

Additional features

  • It is a React Community plugin
  • Provides seamless transition using a simple declarative API from one component state to another over time.
  • It is useful for animating the mounting and unmounting of components.
  • Represent transition phases that are already in existence.

Wrapping up

In this blog we have learnt, you can easily and rapidly design elegant animations and evolutions with the help of countless animation libraries. A JavaScript library called React is useful for designing elegant user interfaces. While some programmers refer to it as React, others are more familiar with the name React. It is a JavaScript library,  that is designed with JavaScript code. User experience is one of the major concerns in modern applications. Designers add many effects to web applications’ UI designs to appeal to more audiences. As developers, we must be proficient enough to deliver the product as they expect. Multiple of these libraries can be modified and have outstanding and simple built-in functionality. With the help of this article, you can be able to choose the top-notch library for your next React js application.

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Best Animation Libraries for React

The React Project for The Open-source Chat Platform

Chat Platform React

This is the React project for the open-source Chat Platform I (Anson) am building from the ground up. To watch the full development process from the beginning, please see the up-to-date playlist on YouTube. To see the back-end project, see the Chat Platform NestJS repository.

For any additional questions, you can always stop by my livestream, connect with me on my Discord Server, or follow me Twitter.

Installation

Before you try to run this project locally, you must have both the React & NestJS project, as well as a SQL database. I use MySQL, but you can switch to another database like PostgreSQL very easily.

  1. Clone this repository and install all dependencies.
  2. Go to Chat Platform NestJS repository and follow all the instructions on setting up the backend.
  3. Run both projects using the start:dev script using either npm, yarn, or whatever package manager you use.
  4. There is no landing page, the main routes are:
    • /register route to create an account
    • /login to login to the app
    • /conversations is where all the magic happens

License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Under this license, you may not use this project for:

  1. Commercial Purposes
  2. Distributing this project after modifying it
  3. You may not use this without appropriate attribution

.env.development

REACT_APP_API_URL=http://localhost:3001/api
REACT_APP_WEBSOCKET_URL=http://localhost:3001

.gitignore

# See https://help.github.com/articles/ignoring-files/ for more about ignoring files.

# dependencies
/node_modules
/.pnp
.pnp.js

# testing
/coverage

# production
/build

# misc
.DS_Store
.env.local
.env.development.local
.env.test.local
.env.production.local

npm-debug.log*
yarn-debug.log*
yarn-error.log*

Download Details:

Author: stuyy
Source Code: https://github.com/stuyy/chat-platform-react

License: View license

#React 

The React Project for The Open-source Chat Platform
Kevin  Taylor

Kevin Taylor

1666711529

Link Previewer: Link Previewer App using React

Link previewer

What is Link Preview?

When you add a URL to an email message on Whatsapp or Instagram app, or when you receive an email message with a URL in the body, you'll see a rich preview that includes a link title, thumbnail image, and description of the link.

Demo link: https://link-previewer.codersgyan.com/

Figma design link: https://www.figma.com/file/dSto38VGrrLAyRoDzbnVh0/Link-previewer?node-id=0%3A1

Project Screen Shot(s)

Example:

Link previewer mockup

Installation and Setup Instructions

Example:

Clone down this repository. You will need node and npm installed globally on your machine.

Installation:

Frontend

cd front
npm install

To Run Test Suite:

npm test

To Start Server:

npm start

To Visit App:

localhost:3000

Backend

cd backend
npm install

To Run Test Suite:

npm test

To Start Server:

npm run dev

Apis will be available at 5500 port if not provided in .env file

http://localhost:5500

Update .env.local for the frontend

REACT_APP_API_URL=http://localhost:5500

Reflection

  • This project was taken as a challenge build hosted by FindCoder portal by iNeuron.
  • This project was really challenging because i had to manage parse the meta information from third party websites.

Download Details:

Author: codersgyan
Source Code: https://github.com/codersgyan/link-previewer-nodejs

#React 

Link Previewer: Link Previewer App using React
code bucks

code bucks

1666184683

React Website Tutorial: ⭐Build Feature Rich Crypto Screener App with Tailwind CSS

https://youtu.be/JPlVb3t6kx8

Tutorial😇 to build a fully functioning Crypto Screener App using React + Tailwind css + Context API + React Router

Demo Link🖤:  https://crypto-bucks.netlify.app/

Blog📖:  https://dev.to/codebucks

Hi there 👋,

In this video, We are going to create an amazing Crypto Screener application. This application shows list of cryptocurrencies and also on click on this coins you can see more details about them with a beautiful chart. Also you can save your favourite coins. This application has functionalities like concurrent search, pagination, sorting etc.

For this project, we're going to use,
▶️ React JS (CRA)
▶️ Tailwind CSS for styling
▶️ React Context API
▶️ React Router
▶️ Recharts to add interactive charts
▶️ CoinGecko Cryptocurrency  APIs
 

Don't forget to watch the whole video, we're going to learn a lot of stuff like,
▶️ How to use Tailwind css in  a ReactJS applications
▶️ How to fetch APIs using fetch
▶️ How to create beautiful and interactive charts in React JS
▶️ How to ue Context API to store states globally
▶️ How to create pagination componen
▶️ How to add searching and sorting functionalities
▶️ Leverage the INTL API of the browser to use different currency formats  

#react #javascript #tailwindcss #React #css #web-development #node 

 

React Website Tutorial: ⭐Build Feature Rich Crypto Screener App with Tailwind CSS

Arun A

1665490602

Create a Simple Dashboard for Data Analysis in React

The right data analysis can result in immense business growth, help you figure out gray areas in your business, and scale your business to the next level.

Every organization collects tons of data, usually in an unstructured way. It is not easy to understand this data, even for technical people who handle it and work with it daily.

To understand the data better, it must be presented in a structured, graphical format. Charts are often the best option as they allow anyone to extensively analyze the data in detail or at a high level, and charts make it easy to compare different data over time.

Syncfusion offers a great library of charts that can be used to represent data in many ways.

Charts are the easy part of data analysis. The complex part is their placement on the screen. Providing flexibility in terms of chart placement, arrangement, and size is challenging.

By providing users with a flexible dashboard, they can rearrange, resize, and replace charts as needed to address the different data analyses they need to perform.

Let’s see how to create a flexible web dashboard for data analysis of code test coverage using Syncfusion Charts and Dashboard Layout components for React.

#React #reactjs #webdev #webdevelopment 

https://www.syncfusion.com/blogs/post/create-a-simple-dashboard-for-data-analysis-in-react.aspx

Create a Simple Dashboard for Data Analysis in React